News

The New Rules of Hydration

Posted by on Jul 15, 2018 @ 7:11 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The New Rules of Hydration

There’s a ton of misinformation about how much to hydrate and when, but the basics are actually pretty simple. Here’s what you need to know. For easy workouts in cool weather lasting an hour or less, drinking only when you’re thirsty is fine. But if it’s at all hot or humid, or you’re going out for a long time, that won’t be adequate. There’s an easy method to figure out exactly how much fluid you need: weigh yourself before you go out for an hour of exercise, and then weigh yourself again when you get home. That’s the weight of...

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Appalachian National Scenic Trail Reroute through the Wallkill National Wildlife Refuge

Posted by on Jul 14, 2018 @ 2:46 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Appalachian National Scenic Trail Reroute through the Wallkill National Wildlife Refuge

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serviceis pleased to announce the release of the Environmental Assessment for the Appalachian National Scenic Trail Reroute through the Wallkill National Wildlife Refuge. The Service plans to move a portion of the Trail from where it crosses the Wallkill River via Oil City Road in Orange County, New York, and relocate the Trail within the Refuge in Sussex County, New Jersey. The National Park Service is participating as a cooperating agency for this project. The agencies are soliciting comments through July 20,...

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‘Bad things happen in the woods’: the anxiety of hiking while black

Posted by on Jul 14, 2018 @ 9:33 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

‘Bad things happen in the woods’: the anxiety of hiking while black

A Guardian Profile by Aaron Jones, 32, Chicago A few years ago, a white friend suggested we go on a hike. All the fears I had about being in nature hit me in the face. It’s a very real fear for black people, especially those from urban communities, that bad things happen to black people in the woods, like lynching. It’s something that you see again and again when you look at the history of the civil rights movement and slavery: black people going into the woods and not coming back. My friend had grown up hiking. I talked to her about my fears...

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Zion National Park Battered By Monsoonal Rains

Posted by on Jul 13, 2018 @ 3:09 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Zion National Park Battered By Monsoonal Rains

Monsoonal rains are taking a toll on Zion National Park, where not only roads are being covered and blocked by debris washed down mountainsides but trails are being torn apart. While Riverside Walk has reopened after a potent storm Wednesday, July 11, 2018 brought flooding, mudslides, and rockfalls to the park, cleanup won’t be easy. As of midday Friday, July 13 the Zion-Mount Carmel Highway and several trails, including Angels Landing, Kayenta, Upper Emerald Pools, and West Rim from the Grotto to Cabin Spring, were all closed. And...

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Here’s What It Takes to Hike the John Muir Trail

Posted by on Jul 12, 2018 @ 11:58 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Here’s What It Takes to Hike the John Muir Trail

  A survey of backpackers’ tactics on the 220-mile high-country route offers insights on what works and what doesn’t. A new paper in the journal Wilderness & Environmental Medicine takes a look at this. Over the last few years, a retired San Francisco lawyer has run an annual online survey of people who hike the John Muir Trail, a famous route through the Sierra Nevadas that typically takes about three weeks to complete. In 2014, 771 people filled out the survey, all of whom planned a trip of at least five days along the...

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Mysterious source of illegal ozone-killing emissions revealed, say investigators

Posted by on Jul 12, 2018 @ 6:51 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Mysterious source of illegal ozone-killing emissions revealed, say investigators

  A mysterious surge in emissions of an illegal ozone-destroying chemical has been tracked down to plastic foam manufacturers in China. The chemical, trichlorofluoromethane or CFC-11, has been banned around the world since 2010 and is a potent destroyer of ozone, which protects life on Earth from UV radiation, and strong greenhouse gas. A shock rise in the gas in recent years was revealed by atmospheric scientists in May, but they could only narrow the source to somewhere in East Asia. The Environmental Investigation Agency, a...

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Safety Concerns Lead To Emergency Closure Near Jenny Lake In Grand Teton National Park

Posted by on Jul 11, 2018 @ 11:48 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Safety Concerns Lead To Emergency Closure Near Jenny Lake In Grand Teton National Park

  A highly popular area near Jenny Lake in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming has been closed to the public for the immediate future due to concerns over expanding cracks and fissures in a large rock formation, park officials said Tuesday evening. The National Park Service implemented an emergency closure in the Hidden Falls and Inspiration Point areas on the west side of Jenny Lake for human safety. Some recently expanding cracks and fissures have been identified in a large rock buttress above the Hidden Falls viewing area, a...

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Weed Patch Mountain Trail, Town of Lake Lure

Posted by on Jul 11, 2018 @ 6:32 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Weed Patch Mountain Trail, Town of Lake Lure

The new Weed Patch Mountain Trail offers exciting backcountry adventures for hikers, mountain bikers, and rock climbers. The 8.6 mile trail traverses rugged mountain terrain through a remote wilderness area in the Town of Lake Lure’s Buffalo Creek Park. Along the way, you’ll find yourself at rock outcrops with spectacular long range views, as well as pristine mountain streams and an old growth forest. The trail is designed for hiking and mountain biking and a spur trail creates the first access to Eagle Rock in Chimney Rock State Park, a rock...

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Off the beaten path: Alarka Institute leads quest for rare mountain flower

Posted by on Jul 10, 2018 @ 12:20 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Off the beaten path: Alarka Institute leads quest for rare mountain flower

For even the most woods-savvy of plant lovers, a blooming mountain camellia is a rare to non-existent sight. A member of the tea family, it’s picky about its habitat, easily susceptible to drought and fire, and reticent to reproduce. All that adds up to a tenuous existence in scattered, isolated populations through the Southern Appalachians. To find a mountain camellia, you’ve got to know where to go and what to look for, and be willing to tromp through the backcountry until you see it. Don’t fertilize it, because the roots can’t take it. If...

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Overlooked No More: Emma Gatewood, First Woman to Conquer the Appalachian Trail Alone

Posted by on Jul 10, 2018 @ 9:08 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Overlooked No More: Emma Gatewood, First Woman to Conquer the Appalachian Trail Alone

What the public knew about Emma Gatewood was already remarkable. She was the first woman to hike the entire Appalachian Trail by herself in one season. She was 67 years old, a mother of 11, a grandmother and even a great-grandmother when she accomplished the feat in 1955. And she personified the concept of low-tech, ultralight hiking, spurning a tent and sleeping bag, carrying only a small sack and relying on her trusty Keds. But what the public did not know was equally remarkable. Grandma Gatewood, as she was called, had survived 30 years of...

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Hike: The Yosemite few people see

Posted by on Jul 9, 2018 @ 9:07 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hike: The Yosemite few people see

Nature has endowed California’s Tuolumne County with such splendor, it almost doesn’t seem fair. That these riches are so easily accessed by hiking trails makes us all the luckier. Before the reservoir was formed by O’Shaughnessy Dam at Yosemite National Park, Hetch Hetchy was a glacier-carved, granite-walled valley complete with a mighty river and waterfalls crashing down from dizzying heights. Sound familiar? Naturalist John Muir called the valley “a wonderfully exact counterpart of the great Yosemite.” Muir led the battle to save the...

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Bumble Bee Watch

Posted by on Jul 7, 2018 @ 12:42 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Bumble Bee Watch

With the news this week that bumble bees have been added to the endangered species list, you may be asking yourself what you can do to help. Enter Bumble Bee Watch, a collaborative effort to track and conserve North America’s bumble bees. This citizen science project allows for individuals to: Upload photos of bumble bees to start a virtual bumble bee collection; Identify the bumble bees in your photos and have your identifications verified by experts; Help researchers determine the status and conservation needs of bumble bees; Help locate...

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We’ve entered the era of ‘fire tsunamis’

Posted by on Jul 7, 2018 @ 9:19 am in Conservation | 0 comments

We’ve entered the era of ‘fire tsunamis’

Life in the Rocky Mountains is frequently extreme as blizzards, baking sun, and fires alternate with the seasons. But fire tsunamis? Those aren’t normal. On July 5, 2018,, one observer described a “tsunami” of flames overnight at the Spring Creek fire near La Veta in the south-central part of the state. And you can’t stop tsunamis. “It was a perfect firestorm,” Ben Brack, incident commander for the Spring Creek fire, told the Denver Post. “You can imagine standing in front of a tsunami or tornado and trying to stop it from destroying homes. A...

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Sacred Native American Sites Are Not Your Playgrounds

Posted by on Jul 6, 2018 @ 9:11 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Sacred Native American Sites Are Not Your Playgrounds

Deep in the Grand Canyon, on land that Havasupai Native Americans have called home for generations, is a place known as Beaver Falls. It’s an unimaginative name for an otherworldly landscape, where turquoise water tumbles over a series of terraces gouged into red desert walls. To legally reach the falls, you have to pay the Havasupai $140, hike ten miles to the tribe’s campground, then hike an additional four miles to the waterfall. The camping and hiking permits are one of the tribe’s few sources of revenue, and help ensure that Beaver Falls...

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The State of the Nation’s Forests

Posted by on Jul 5, 2018 @ 1:47 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

The State of the Nation’s Forests

Forests are constantly changing with weather, disturbance, and conversion to other land uses, but how do we know if year-to-year changes are just a one-off or part of a larger shift? Annual summaries of forest health are key to our understanding, say the editors and authors that produced Forest Health Monitoring: National Status, Trends, and Analysis 2017. Scientists from across the Forest Service as well as university researchers, state partners, and many other experts contributed to the 2017 FHM report, which is the only national summary of...

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Swiss Re limits thermal coal coverage

Posted by on Jul 5, 2018 @ 6:58 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Swiss Re limits thermal coal coverage

Swiss Re Ltd. will not provide insurance or reinsurance to businesses with more than 30% thermal coal exposure. The Zurich-based reinsurer has started implementation of its thermal coal policy, adopted as part of Swiss Re’s “strong commitment” to adopt the principles of the Paris climate agreement, which reaffirmed a goal of limiting the global temperature increase below 2 degrees Celsius and committed countries to develop plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and regularly report on their progress. “As a result, Swiss Re supports a...

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Deepwater Horizon disaster altered building blocks of ocean life

Posted by on Jul 4, 2018 @ 7:15 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Deepwater Horizon disaster altered building blocks of ocean life

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster may have had a lasting impact upon even the smallest organisms in the Gulf of Mexico, scientists have found – amid warnings that the oceans around America are also under fresh assault as a result of environmental policies under Donald Trump. Lingering oil residues have altered the basic building blocks of life in the ocean by reducing biodiversity in sites closest to the spill, which occurred when a BP drilling rig exploded in April 2010, killing 11 workers and spewing about 4m barrels of oil into...

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Cultural hiking in Italy: Tuscany trekking from Florence to Siena

Posted by on Jul 3, 2018 @ 7:05 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Cultural hiking in Italy: Tuscany trekking from Florence to Siena

Of all the various modes of travel, by foot is the most intimate and also the most natural. Hiking allows you an often overlooked and underrated relationship with your surroundings. Walking forces you to interact, take your time, and truly inhale the world around. Nowhere else on the globe are these intangible benefits more celebrated than the famed Italian countryside of Tuscany. From the artistic capital of the renaissance in Florence, to the Gothic cathedral spires in Siena, this sprawling region is characterized by rolling hills,...

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Bumblebee Has Officially Been Added To The Ever-Growing List Of Endangered Species

Posted by on Jul 3, 2018 @ 6:29 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Bumblebee Has Officially Been Added To The Ever-Growing List Of Endangered Species

It’s official, the bumblebee has been added to the ever-growing list of endangered species along with the grizzly bear, the northern spotted owl, the gray wolf, and about 700 other animal species which are extinct. Once abundant in the grasslands and prairies of the East and Midwest, the rusty-patched bee has now been restricted to protections in the continental US as its population keeps dwindling at an alarming rate. It has been estimated that 95% of bumblebees now only exist in isolated pockets in twelve states and the province of...

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Private Investment Will Jump Start Rural Economy

Posted by on Jul 2, 2018 @ 12:06 pm in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Private Investment Will Jump Start Rural Economy

Ringed by miles of abandoned coal mines, the Wayne National Forest is surrounded by some of the most economically distressed communities in southern Ohio. A unique partnership with private investors, local leaders, a university, and nonprofit partners is helping to change that. The Forest Service is working with the National Forest Foundation and Quantified Ventures to explore how an innovative finance mechanism can support an 88-mile multiuse trail on 9,000 acres of national forest land in Athens County. Dubbed the Baileys Trail System, the...

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Flood Damage Repair at Linville Falls

Posted by on Jul 2, 2018 @ 6:35 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Flood Damage Repair at Linville Falls

At the request of the Blue Ridge Parkway Maintenance out of Gillespie Gap, the Crabtree Falls FRIENDS of the BRP Chapter and the NC High Peaks Trail Association assisted in the cleanup of flood damage at Linville Falls on Monday, June 25, 2018. Eleven members and friends of the chapter worked on this project. The team had two goals: Remove flood debris from the upper falls overlook area Upright seven stone columns toppled and displaced by the flood The team worked closely with three Parkway employees to get all this work done safely. They...

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Husky saves deaf hiker, and dozens of others, on Alaskan trail

Posted by on Jul 1, 2018 @ 7:24 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Husky saves deaf hiker, and dozens of others, on Alaskan trail

This rescue dog is making it his life’s work to rescue others. Nanook, an Alaskan husky, has been known to scout the trailhead of the 24-mile long Crow Pass Trail, about half a mile from Girdwood, Alaska, looking for hikers to assist on their journey. Nanook’s heroics were on full display when he rescued deaf Rochester Institute of Technology student Amelia Milling. She had lost her footing and plummeted 600 feet down the mountain, when Nanook appeared and guided her back to the path. But his work wasn’t done yet. He stayed with her as she...

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How to Prepare for Your First Backpacking Trip

Posted by on Jun 30, 2018 @ 4:50 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

How to Prepare for Your First Backpacking Trip

The thought of backpacking in the outdoors can be scary for some people. The idea of carrying everything you need from water to toilet paper on your back for an extended period of time can be challenging for some to overcome. Especially knowing you have to carry that weight for miles at a time. Say you wanted to go backpacking but had never actually done anything longer than a day hike. Whether your first backpacking trip is 30 days or 3 days, you should definitely at least try backpacking it. You don’t have to like it when you’re...

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How to Prevent and Treat Hiking Blisters

Posted by on Jun 30, 2018 @ 7:01 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

How to Prevent and Treat Hiking Blisters

For hikers and backpackers having happy feet means happy trails. There’s nothing worse than painful hiking blisters that get worse with each step and seriously keep you from enjoying your time in the outdoors. The good news is that these annoying injuries can be remedied, but you’re even better off learning how to prevent hiking blisters in the first place. A blister is formed from damaged skin that is a result of rubbing and friction or is sometimes caused by heat, cold or in rare conditions exposure to harmful chemicals. When you are hiking...

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Climate change is making it harder to revive damaged land

Posted by on Jun 29, 2018 @ 2:56 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Climate change is making it harder to revive damaged land

Carianne Campbell remembers the exact moment she fell in love with the Sonoran Desert. As a botany major in college, she joined a class field trip to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument on the southern border of Arizona, arriving and setting up camp in the dark. Emerging from her tent the next morning, Campbell, who grew up on the East Coast, caught her first glimpse of enormous saguaros, clustered organ pipes and bright desert wildflowers. She knew immediately that she wanted to work in this kind of landscape. Today, Campbell is the...

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20 Mining Claims Have Been Staked On Land Trump Cut From Monument Protection

Posted by on Jun 29, 2018 @ 8:53 am in Conservation | 0 comments

20 Mining Claims Have Been Staked On Land Trump Cut From Monument Protection

At least 20 new mining claims totaling about 460 acres have been staked on land President Donald Trump removed from national monument protection late last year. The claims indicate there is interest in extracting minerals from lands that until recently were off limits to such development. Trump signed a pair of proclamations late last year reducing the size of the 1.35-million-acre Bears Ears National Monument by 85 percent and the 1.87-million-acre Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument by roughly 50 percent. It was the largest...

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8 Things to Know Before You Hike the Appalachian Trail

Posted by on Jun 28, 2018 @ 12:32 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

8 Things to Know Before You Hike the Appalachian Trail

Stretching more than 2,190 miles across 14 different states, the Appalachian Trail may be the best long-distance hiking route in the entire world. Each year, 3 million people trek at least a portion of the trail, with just a fraction of those walking its entire length. Those “thru-hikers” learn a lot during early days of their journey, and most will tell you there is no way to fully prepare for the challenge of walking the AT end-to-end other than just doing it. Still, there are some pearls of wisdom that can prepare you for the...

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How to Escape a Wildfire When You’re Hiking

Posted by on Jun 28, 2018 @ 6:37 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

How to Escape a Wildfire When You’re Hiking

On Labor Day weekend 2017, Oregon’s backcountry ignited, the night sky glowing red from flames. Peter Ames Carlin, his wife, and their three children were among 176 hikers who were surrounded by a wildfire on the Eagle Creek Trail, a short jaunt from Portland in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). As the blaze blocked a safe exit to the north, to the south, the Indian Creek Fire—which had been smoldering for months—reawakened and threatened to trap the hikers amid steep canyons. “I was mostly in a stage of intense denial. We...

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The Egyptian Hike That’s Rewriting History

Posted by on Jun 27, 2018 @ 8:26 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Egyptian Hike That’s Rewriting History

The Sinai Trail has been dubbed one of the best new hikes in the world, and was awarded best new tourism initiative. While there are harder, headier walks, none are so rich with history – and none are built upon such unlikely bonds. Bedouin tribes have long escorted pilgrims from all corners across the Sinai – Muslims en route to Mecca, Christians to St Catherine or Jerusalem – with each tribe handing them to the next at its border. “Then came cars and planes, and people forgot this way,” a guide said. Deprived of guiding work, many Bedouin...

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The Hiker’s Guide to Trail Etiquette

Posted by on Jun 26, 2018 @ 1:06 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Hiker’s Guide to Trail Etiquette

  It might feel like there aren’t any rules out in the great outdoors, but there are certainly guidelines you should follow. Whether you’re new to hiking or always been confused about the do’s and don’ts of the trail, this guide will clear things up. Hiking uphill is harder than hiking downhill most of the time. And when people hike uphill, they tend to have a smaller field of view because they’re usually looking down at their footing. That’s why it’s important you give hikers on their way up a slope the right of way....

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7 summer hikes near Salt Lake City you won’t want to miss

Posted by on Jun 26, 2018 @ 8:56 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

7 summer hikes near Salt Lake City you won’t want to miss

There’s something about summer that inspires people to head outdoors. And when you’re surrounded by tons of gorgeous mountains, hiking seems like the natural choice. The amount of local hikes to choose from, however, can get overwhelming. Enter the second edition of “Best Hikes Salt Lake City” by Lori J. Lee. Not only does it contain a comprehensive list of great hikes, but detailed information such as the average time it takes to hike a trail, the level of difficulty, whether or not there’s a fee, if it’s kid- or canine-friendly and much...

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The Bountiful Benefits Of Bringing Back The Beavers

Posted by on Jun 25, 2018 @ 12:53 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

The Bountiful Benefits Of Bringing Back The Beavers

Few species manipulate their surroundings enough to make big ecological changes. Humans are one. Beavers are another. At one point, the rodents numbered in the hundreds of millions in North America, changing the ecological workings of countless streams and rivers. As settlers moved West, they hunted and trapped them to near extinction. Now there are new efforts across the Western U.S. to understand what makes them tick, mimic their engineering skills, boost their numbers, and in turn, get us more comfortable with the way they transform rivers...

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Leave No Trace includes your hiking posts on social media

Posted by on Jun 24, 2018 @ 12:45 pm in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Leave No Trace includes your hiking posts on social media

Social media plays a big role in many people’s lives, and it’s only natural that our love of sharing would extend to the outdoors. As more and more hikers are enjoying trails, it’s important to remember that social media can have an impact on how good hiking behavior is shared in the hiking community. The national Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics released a set of guidelines with tips on how to promote positive hiking behavior on social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to ensure that the trails we all love to hike...

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Hike, Rock Climb, Fish + More in California’s Eastern Sierra

Posted by on Jun 24, 2018 @ 7:21 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hike, Rock Climb, Fish + More in California’s Eastern Sierra

California’s Eastern Sierra is a fascinating landscape, a land where 14,000-foot summits descend to sage-filled plains, where the oldest trees on earth still stand atop wind scoured ridges, where geothermal springs pepper one of the word’s largest calderas, and where limestone columns rise from an ancient alkaline lake. Found amongst and within these unique natural features is a region teeming with outdoor recreation opportunities. The Sierra’s steep eastern escarpment is home to Whitney Portal, the gateway to Mount Whitney....

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