News

DPS Crew Discovers Mysterious Monolith From Air In Remote Utah Wilderness

Posted by on Nov 25, 2020 @ 6:08 am in Conservation | 0 comments

DPS Crew Discovers Mysterious Monolith From Air In Remote Utah Wilderness

The Utah Department of Public Safety helicopter was assisting Utah Division of Wildlife Resource officers counting bighorn sheep when the crew spotted something mysterious from above. “One of the biologists is the one who spotted it and we just happened to fly directly over the top of it,” said pilot Bret Hutchings. “He was like, ‘Whoa, whoa, whoa, turn around, turn around!’ And I was like, ‘what.’ And he’s like, ‘There’s this thing back there – we’ve got to go look at it!’” The crew circled back and landed the helicopter to take a closer...

read more

Waterfall Keepers of North Carolina

Posted by on Nov 24, 2020 @ 6:14 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Waterfall Keepers of North Carolina

Announcing Waterfall Keepers of North Carolina, the only organization dedicated to the state’s resplendent falling water. Waterfalls are among the few natural wonders that excite all five of our senses at once. We feel the spray against our skin. We hear the calming sound of the falling water. We smell and taste the moisture in the air. And, of course, we see the sublime beauty. Waterfalls give us so much. Let’s pick up the trash, clear the trails, and protect the plants and animals that live in the waterfall environment. Let’s help make...

read more

Microplastics found at the highest point on Earth as the glaciers around Mount Everest’s death zone melt

Posted by on Nov 22, 2020 @ 6:18 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Microplastics found at the highest point on Earth as the glaciers around Mount Everest’s death zone melt

Microplastics are one of the most harmful side effects of humans using the planet, and they’re increasingly being found in hard to reach planes. After being detected in the deepest point on the Earth, the Marina Tech, microplastics have now been found near the Earth’s highest point — the death zone of Mount Everest. It’s called the ‘death zone’ because that’s where the level of oxygen is insufficient to sustain human life over an extended period. It is defined as any area located over 8,000 meters above sea...

read more

Blue Ridge Tunnel Trail soon to open to the public

Posted by on Nov 21, 2020 @ 6:53 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Blue Ridge Tunnel Trail soon to open to the public

The long-anticipated opening of the Blue Ridge Tunnel trail will soon be a reality. The roughly 2.25-mile trail is scheduled to open to pedestrians and bicyclists Saturday November 21. A portion of the trail runs through a railroad tunnel that was constructed between 1850 to 1858, which was led by engineer Claudius Crozet. At a distance of nearly 1 mile, it was the longest tunnel in America at the time of its completion. The trail project has been in the works since 2001. “You know, we did have to postpone quite a few times, but now we just...

read more

Popular hiking guide “100 Favorite Trails” updated for the first time in over two decades

Posted by on Nov 20, 2020 @ 6:57 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Popular hiking guide “100 Favorite Trails” updated for the first time in over two decades

100 Favorite Trails of the Smokies and the Carolina Blue Ridge, an essential guide for avid hikers, has been updated for the first time in 25 years. The guide features a full-color map printed on waterproof paper for hikers to keep track of trails. 27 of the trails featured in the guide are found in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Originally created in 1966 by Bernard Elias, who hiked 10 to 12 trails a year and updated the information using a special shorthand he created. The map he made was an immediate hit among avid hikers — its...

read more

Conserving Carolina reaches deal to buy rail line for Ecusta Trail

Posted by on Nov 19, 2020 @ 5:22 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Conserving Carolina reaches deal to buy rail line for Ecusta Trail

Hendersonville, NC-based land conservancy Conserving Carolina has reached an agreement to buy the railroad line from Hendersonville to Brevard, marking a major leap forward in plans for the 19-mile Ecusta Trail. In a move that was crucial, the Henderson County Board of Commissioners on Wednesday authorized a $7 million bridge loan that will make the sale possible. Conserving Carolina had been negotiating the purchase for months with Kansas-based Watco, the railroad owner that operates shortline freight lines in Western North Carolina as Blue...

read more

What’s That Cloud? Your Guide to Cloudspotting

Posted by on Nov 18, 2020 @ 6:49 am in Conservation | 0 comments

What’s That Cloud? Your Guide to Cloudspotting

Clouds are grouped into 10 different genera, organized based on shape and the altitude where they’re found. The genera names are all formed from the same five latin terms — cirro, cumulo, strato, nimbo, alto — which are mixed and matched to create names like cumulonimbus, cirrostratus, cirrocumuus…. you get the idea. Learning what each of these Latin roots means is key to keeping your clouds straight: Cumulo translates to “heaped.” Think puffy, piled, marshmellowy clouds. Strato translates to “layered.” Clouds with strato in their name are...

read more

Two Kansas trails receive national designations

Posted by on Nov 17, 2020 @ 6:26 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Two Kansas trails receive national designations

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism’s Flint Hills Trail and Prairie Spirit Trail state parks recently received America’s highest trails honor when they were designated National Recreational Trails by the National Park Service. Both state park trails are operated by KDWPT’s Parks Division. “This is significant, not only for those parks and our state parks system, but for the state of Kansas,” said Linda Lanterman, KDWPT’s Parks Division director. “This is going to draw valuable attention to two great state parks and all they have...

read more

Celebrate National ‘Take a Hike Day’ this Nov. 17, 2020

Posted by on Nov 16, 2020 @ 6:20 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Celebrate National ‘Take a Hike Day’ this Nov. 17, 2020

It’s time to celebrate Mother Nature, so lace up your hiking boots, collar your dog, get some water and a snack and hit the trails on National “Take a Hike Day,” which is Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020. This is day hosted by The American Hiking Society, whose mission is to envision a world where everyone feels a sense of belonging in the hiking community and has lasting access to meaningful hiking experiences, be that in urban, front country, or backcountry settings. “We are so excited to partner with the American Hiking Society, says local...

read more

A Message to All A.T. Hikers in 2021

Posted by on Nov 15, 2020 @ 6:37 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A Message to All A.T. Hikers in 2021

In March 2020, America began to feel the first impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, which would upend almost every aspect of our daily lives. Eight months later, COVID-19 infection rates continue to rise and a widely distributed vaccine or treatment is still not available. We also find ourselves adapting to a constantly shifting political, social, and economic landscape. The world, in short, is characterized by uncertainty, and planning for the future is near impossible. This uncertainty extends to the 2021 Appalachian Trail (A.T.) hiking...

read more

Cleanest air on record: Pandemic accelerates long-term move toward cleaner air in N.C.

Posted by on Nov 14, 2020 @ 7:00 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Cleanest air on record: Pandemic accelerates long-term move toward cleaner air in N.C.

When President Richard Nixon ‘s signature on the Clean Air Act of 1970 prompted North Carolina to create its Division of Air Quality, air quality was bad in Western North Carolina. “Back in the ‘80s or the ‘90s, once summer hit your mountains would disappear,” recalled Jim Renfro, longtime air quality specialist for the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. “You’re outside in the valley looking up, and you couldn’t see the mountains through the haze.” In one of the true environmental success stories of the past century, the situation has...

read more

1,500 acres of historic land added to the Francis Marion National Forest in SC

Posted by on Nov 13, 2020 @ 6:41 am in Conservation | 0 comments

1,500 acres of historic land added to the Francis Marion National Forest in SC

Located just north of McClellanville, SC, the 1,450-acre White Oak Atlantic Creosote tract contains an extensive network of dirt roads through some of the most beautiful native longleaf pine woods in the Lowcountry. The property was purchased from White Oak Forestry Corporation — a local corporation that stewards and conserves thousands of acres of significant forest in and around the Santee Delta. Bordered on three sides by the quarter-million-acre national forest, the property sits across Highway 17 from the 22,000-acre Santee Coastal...

read more

Shattered on the Pacific Crest Trail

Posted by on Nov 12, 2020 @ 6:52 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Shattered on the Pacific Crest Trail

When they wake up broke, broken, and far from home, how do thru-hikers find the will to go another mile? We usually focus on the pleasures of a long-distance hike. We tell ourselves the pain will dissolve into a march of panoramas from Mexico to Canada. But the truth of thru-hiking is that it is brutally physical. This excerpt from recently published Journeys North by Triple Crowner and PCT trail angel Barney “Scout” Mann follows his northbound Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike in 2007, tracking his experience and those of fellow thru-hikers...

read more

Hikers find message dropped by carrier pigeon in 1910

Posted by on Nov 10, 2020 @ 6:33 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hikers find message dropped by carrier pigeon in 1910

  A couple hiking in northeastern France came across an unusual historical artifact – a carrier pigeon message dating from 110 years earlier. Jade Halaoui said he was hiking with his partner in the Ingersheim area when they spotted a tiny aluminum cylinder on the ground. “I dug it up and I cut it to see what was inside,” Halaoui recalled. Inside was a small piece of paper bearing a message the couple could not make out. They took it to the Linge Memorial museum, where curator Dominique Jardy enlisted the help of a...

read more

Combat holiday stress and weight gain with hiking

Posted by on Nov 9, 2020 @ 6:18 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Combat holiday stress and weight gain with hiking

The holidays are drawing near, and it should be the season to be merry, but let’s face it — sometimes it isn’t. Unfortunately, the demands and heightened emotions this time of year can occasionally cause stress and anxiety. That stress may also lead to weight gain in addition to other factors such as sleep deprivation and parties with excessive food and alcohol. John Muir, the great conservationist and outdoorsman, once said, “In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks.” Mr. Muir was correct. Hiking offers a lot — with far...

read more

A Parent’s Guide to Hiking with a Chatterbox

Posted by on Nov 8, 2020 @ 6:59 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A Parent’s Guide to Hiking with a Chatterbox

It’s been a terrible year for all of us, especially kids. The pandemic has eliminated the kind of routine social interaction we’ve all taken for granted. No team sports, no movies, no museums, no sleepovers, no playdates. Parents face the dual tasks of making sure their kids are getting the physical activity they need as well as trying to replace the lost hours of socialization. “The brain, like other body parts, needs exercise to stay healthy,” says Tracy Inman, associate director of the Center for Gifted Studies at Western Kentucky...

read more

Tallgrass prairie region provides a Minnesota hiking alternative

Posted by on Nov 7, 2020 @ 6:21 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Tallgrass prairie region provides a Minnesota hiking alternative

While wooded hikes are popular in Minnesota, the woods are not required, as the tallgrass prairie region in the southwestern corner of the state offers unique places to get out and view the diverse landscape. Getting lost in the woods while on a walk is a common problem in fairy tales, and in renowned horror stories. Even if you leave bread crumbs behind, in the style of Hansel and Gretel, if you venture off the trail, all of the rocks and trees start to look the same, eventually. Minnesota is renowned for its big woods hiking, even though...

read more

Italy’s New Coast-to-coast Hiking Trail Is Filled With Mountains and Beaches to Explore

Posted by on Nov 6, 2020 @ 6:32 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Italy’s New Coast-to-coast Hiking Trail Is Filled With Mountains and Beaches to Explore

The Italian region of Calabria is bookmarked by two seas with mountains and beaches in between. And now a new trail has opened that will allow hikers to explore Calabria from coast to coast and experience the stunning nature that it’s known for. The Kalabria Coast to Coast Trail connects the town of Soverato on the Ionian Sea to the town of Pizzo on the Tyrrhenian Sea. The trail is about 34 miles long with a range of landscapes and difficulty levels from medium to medium-high, so people of differing abilities and athleticism can enjoy it. The...

read more

Alabama’s leading National Forests advocates announce rebirth of Wild Alabama

Posted by on Nov 5, 2020 @ 6:17 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Alabama’s leading National Forests advocates announce rebirth of Wild Alabama

Some good news for Alabama’s National Forests. Wild South, the North Carolina based regional forest protection group has announced plans to restructure the organization and form a new independent and separate non-profit organization called Wild Alabama. As part of the restructuring, the group will keep the entire staff and maintain its current programs and office in Moulton, Alabama, near the Bankhead National Forest. The new Alabama-based group will continue a close sisterhood relationship with Wild South. Even though it will officially be a...

read more

A detailed road map for building a US energy innovation ecosystem

Posted by on Nov 4, 2020 @ 6:52 am in Conservation | 0 comments

A detailed road map for building a US energy innovation ecosystem

“Innovation” is a fraught concept in climate politics. For years, it was used as a kind of fig leaf to cover for delaying tactics, as though climate progress must wait on some kind of technological breakthrough or miracle. That left climate advocates with an enduring suspicion toward the notion, and hostility toward those championing it. Lately, though, that has changed. Among people serious about the climate crisis, it is now widely acknowledged that hitting the world’s ambitious emissions targets will require decreasing resource...

read more

A Nameless Hiker and the Case the Internet Can’t Crack

Posted by on Nov 3, 2020 @ 6:55 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A Nameless Hiker and the Case the Internet Can’t Crack

Back in April 2017, a man started hiking in a state park just north of New York City. He wanted to get away, maybe from something and maybe from everything. He didn’t bring a phone; he didn’t bring a credit card. He didn’t even really bring a name. Or at least he didn’t tell anyone he met what it was. He did bring a giant backpack, which his fellow hikers considered far too heavy for his journey. And he brought a notebook, in which he would scribble notes about Screeps, an online programming game. The Appalachian Trail runs through the area,...

read more

The Best Hiking Pants for Women

Posted by on Nov 2, 2020 @ 7:05 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Best Hiking Pants for Women

Hiking pants are an essential piece of any outdoor kit: they defend your legs against weather, UV rays, and many natural hazards. Some can even serve double duty as acceptable business-casual wear. But a good pair can be hard to find. This is especially true for women, since there are so many variables at play: leg length, hip width, thigh-muscle circumference, butt size. Whether you are short or tall, petite or plus-size, you probably have a very specific list of criteria when you look for pants. So Outside Magazine set out to find the best...

read more

In a mountain range too steep to cross, DHS is spending millions of dollars on five miles of border wall

Posted by on Nov 1, 2020 @ 6:21 am in Conservation | 0 comments

In a mountain range too steep to cross, DHS is spending millions of dollars on five miles of border wall

Racing to fulfill President Donald Trump’s campaign promises, the Department of Homeland Security is dynamiting cliff sides and carving switchback roads up incredibly steep mountains to build a 30-foot-tall border wall through Guadalupe Canyon. Not only is the construction expensive, it will have little impact on undocumented immigration into the U.S. It will, however, destroy an important North American wildlife corridor. Diana Hadley, a retired environmental historian, knows firsthand the remoteness of Guadalupe Canyon, a lush riparian...

read more

Bridge Repair Work Begins Across Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Posted by on Oct 31, 2020 @ 6:41 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Bridge Repair Work Begins Across Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials announced that the Federal Highway Administration awarded two construction contracts to replace seven bridges and repair seven others across the park. The work will continue through January 19, 2022 and necessitates several single-lane closures and a few full road closures to safely accomplish the repairs. Forge Creek Road in the Cades Cove area will be closed to all use beginning November 2, 2020 through May 27, 2021 to replace five bridges. Due to the complete removal of the bridges and the use...

read more

Fees at national parks waived for veterans, Gold Star families starting November 2020

Posted by on Oct 30, 2020 @ 6:16 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Fees at national parks waived for veterans, Gold Star families starting November 2020

Starting next month, veterans and Gold Star families will be able to visit national parks and other public lands for free, under a new initiative from the Department of the Interior. Active-duty service members and their families are already granted free access to those sites under existing department rules. The new announcement broadens that benefit to more than 20 million more individuals in recognition of their service and sacrifice on behalf of the country. The policy includes admittance to well-known sites like Yellowstone National Park...

read more

4-year-old breaks hiking record with medical missionary family on Appalachian Trail

Posted by on Oct 29, 2020 @ 6:07 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

4-year-old breaks hiking record with medical missionary family on Appalachian Trail

  A volunteer physician family serving in the Northern African country of Chad took a seven-month break to hike the Appalachian Trail with their four children — their 4-year-old girl is believed to be the youngest to complete the iconic 2,193-mile hike from Georgia to Maine. Doctors Olen and Danae Netteburg, Loma Linda University School of Medicine graduates (Olen 2007, Danae 2006), have been working as Deferred Mission Appointees — medical missionaries — in Chad at Bere Adventist Hospital since 2010. The 100-bed facility is an...

read more

12 Reasons You’ll Love (and Hate) Night Hiking

Posted by on Oct 28, 2020 @ 7:11 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

12 Reasons You’ll Love (and Hate) Night Hiking

The second full moon of October, the Blue Moon, will fall on Halloween night this year. What better way to celebrate the convergence of a rare lunar phenomenon and the spookiest night of the year than with a moonlit night hike this weekend? Night hiking isn’t something to fear or avoid. In fact, it can be pretty darn glorious in its own way (think starry skies, moonlit vistas, and endless cricket serenades). And for backpackers trying to put in big miles, it can become a necessity as the days get shorter heading into winter. Whether you start...

read more

How the US could lead on climate change — in 8 simple steps

Posted by on Oct 27, 2020 @ 6:37 am in Conservation | 0 comments

How the US could lead on climate change — in 8 simple steps

Imagine a green future for a hot second. The United States and the rest of the world have taken substantive action to slow (and even reverse) climate change. Crisis averted. You’re probably envisioning a lot of the following: snazzy yet affordable electric cars, smog-free city skylines, and an electrical grid powered by sweet, sweet, renewable energy. Well, you likely already realize that the nation is nowhere near approaching that eco-friendly dreamscape. In fact, the U.S. is currently on a path away from that green dream. Emissions have...

read more

How exploring the hikes and waterfalls of Taiwan connected this writer to her family’s immigration story

Posted by on Oct 26, 2020 @ 6:57 am in Book Reviews, Hiking News | 0 comments

How exploring the hikes and waterfalls of Taiwan connected this writer to her family’s immigration story

After a number of attempts trying to fictionalize her family history, nature writer Jessica J. Lee found that her academic work in environmental history actually helped unlock how to tell the story. “I had been trying for many years to write this story of my grandparents,” said Lee, the author of “Two Trees Make a Forest: Travels Among Taiwan’s Mountains and Coasts in Search of My Family’s Past,” which mixes family history, memoir and nature writing. Lee’s maternal grandparents were both born in mainland China, emigrating first to Taiwan...

read more

Here’s the Ultimate Guide to Vegan Hiking Snacks

Posted by on Oct 25, 2020 @ 6:16 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Here’s the Ultimate Guide to Vegan Hiking Snacks

One important part of planning a day hike is to make sure that you’re fueling yourself properly, especially for tough climbs or long treks. Packing the right food can help make the day that much more enjoyable. These vegan hiking snacks are portable, easy to pack, and satisfying during and after a long day on the trail. They also don’t contain any animal-derived ingredients, so you can enjoy the great outdoors knowing that you aren’t contributing to the suffering of cows, pigs, chickens, or other animals used for food. The best snacks are...

read more

Lake Norman nature park to offer miles of hiking, biking

Posted by on Oct 24, 2020 @ 7:06 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Lake Norman nature park to offer miles of hiking, biking

Outdoors enthusiasts from across the Charlotte, NC region are the target market of a 606-acre nature park underway on the northern tip of Lake Norman. Mountain Creek Park in Sherrills Ford will feature 19 miles of hiking and mountain bike trails when it opens next summer or early fall, along with kayaking and paddleboarding, picnic areas and a fishing pier. The $8.5 million Catawba County park, on Little Mountain Road off N.C. 150, also will include dog parks, playgrounds, pickleball courts and a park office-educational center. The park is 40...

read more