News

Woman sentenced for vandalism in several National Park Service sites

Posted by on Jun 14, 2016 @ 9:31 am in Conservation | 0 comments

The woman who defaced sites within several national parks in 2014 pleaded guilty June 13, 2016 to seven misdemeanor counts of damaging government property. Casey Nocket, age 23, was ordered by a federal judge to serve two years of probation and 200 hours of community service. She is also banned from all lands administered by the National Park Service (NPS), US Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Army Corps of Engineers during her probation period. A Special Agent, aided by an Intelligence Analyst, conducted the lengthy...

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Greenland witnessed its highest June temperature ever recorded

Posted by on Jun 14, 2016 @ 7:47 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Nuuk, Greenland’s capital, soared to 75 degrees (24 Celsius) Thursday, June 9, 2016, marking the warmest temperature ever recorded in the Arctic country during June. Nuuk sits on Greenland’s southwest coast, where the country’s warmest weather typically occurs. It was warmer in Nuuk than it was in New York City, where the high was only 71 degrees. The Danish Meteorological Institute has confirmed on a preliminary basis that the Nuuk measurement would replace the previous record of 73.8 degrees (23.2 Celsius), which was set in Kangerlussuaq on...

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NFF Celebrates Completion of Work on Oregon’s Deschutes National Forest

Posted by on Jun 13, 2016 @ 10:14 am in Conservation | 0 comments

NFF Celebrates Completion of Work on Oregon’s Deschutes National Forest

Last month the National Forest Foundation gathered with partners, friends and collaborators to celebrate the culmination of years of effort on the Deschutes National Forest. Part of their Treasured Landscapes, Unforgettable Experiences campaign, “The Tale of Two Rivers” site leveraged more than $4 million to restore Whychus Creek and Metolius River. The event took place at the new Whychus Overlook, the final piece of the site work, which provides stunning views of the Three Sisters Wilderness. These rivers are truly treasured landscapes...

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Air pollution named as leading cause in strokes

Posted by on Jun 12, 2016 @ 8:14 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Each year, around 15 million people globally suffer from strokes and it is the fifth leading cause of death in the U.S. Scientists have long known that behavioral factors like diet, smoking, and exercise all contribute to those statistics, but now, a new study names another leading contributor: air pollution. The study, funded by public health groups in the U.S. and New Zealand, found that environmental and household air pollution was associated with a third of global strokes in 2013. The number was significantly higher in developing...

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Our Dry, Warm Future may Favor Oaks

Posted by on Jun 11, 2016 @ 12:48 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Historically, many oak forests across the eastern U.S. experienced frequent low-intensity fires that promoted the establishment and growth of oaks. “However, fire and other disturbances have become less common,” says U.S. Forest Service scientist James Vose. “Red maple, tulip poplar, and other mesophytic, fire-sensitive, and shade-tolerant trees are increasing in many areas of the eastern U.S.” But what does the future hold? Over the coming decades, changes in fire regimes, climate, and land use will continue to affect forests. However, new...

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Raising money with safe hiking cards

Posted by on Jun 11, 2016 @ 8:35 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Raising money with safe hiking cards

Purchasing a Colorado outdoor recreation search and rescue card could help anyone in need get rescued as quickly as possible. A CORSAR card helps fund search and rescue teams for costs they spend during a mission. Search and rescue teams are made up of volunteers and the funds from a CORSAR card helps pay for their training and equipment. Colorado residents and visitors are well served by dedicated volunteer search and rescue teams, but mission costs are often in the thousands of dollars. By purchasing a CORSAR card you are contributing to...

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New bridges open access to Washington’s 23-mile-long Willapa Hills Trail

Posted by on Jun 10, 2016 @ 8:32 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Willapa Hills Trail keeps getting better — and longer. It’s now possible to walk or even ride a bicycle for 23 miles from Chehalis in Southwestern Washington to Pe Ell without getting stopped by a washed-out bridge. The State Parks Commission will hold a public dedication to several new bridges on the trail at 10 a.m. June 18, 2016 in Adna. On June 25, the Willapa Hills Festival will celebrate the recent trail work. But any day with decent weather is a good time to explore the trail, which is about an hour’s drive from Kelso. Walkers and...

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Google to map Vancouver Island hiking trails using street view technology

Posted by on Jun 9, 2016 @ 10:31 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Google has mapped out British Columbia’s roads using its 360-degree street view technology – so why not turn an eye to the province’s many hiking trails? For the next 100 days, the tech giant is sending volunteers wearing state-of-the-art backpack cameras to explore 1,500 kilometres of West Coast forests and mountains. Some of the locations going digital on Vancouver Island potentially include the West Coast Trail and hiking trails on the North Coast. They’ll also trek around rugged and remote landscapes like Haida Gwaii, Mount Edziza and the...

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Arctic Sea Ice Plummets To Staggering Low In May, While CO2 Levels Hit Record High

Posted by on Jun 9, 2016 @ 7:10 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Last month saw the biggest year-over-year jump in atmospheric levels of heat-trapping carbon dioxide on record — 3.76 parts per million. And that, reports NOAA, took May 2016 to the highest monthly levels of CO2 in the air ever measured — 407.7 ppm. At the same time, the National Snow and Ice Data Center reports the warming-driven death spiral of Arctic sea ice hit a staggering new May low. May 2016 saw Arctic sea ice extent drop “about 600,000 square kilometers (232,000 square miles) below any previous year in the 38-year satellite record.”...

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Reopening of Courthouse Creek Road

Posted by on Jun 8, 2016 @ 7:04 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Courthouse Creek Road (Forest Service Road 140), located in the Pisgah Ranger District off Highway 215 just north of Balsam Grove in Transylvania County, NC will reopen Friday, June 10, 2016 at 10 am. Other work in the area is ongoing so visitors should be aware of the potential for construction traffic. The road had been closed while the U.S. Forest Service replaced a bridge. Severe storms this past winter damaged other sections of the road and delayed completion of the bridge. The construction of the new bridge was designed to have minimal...

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Fireworks are Prohibited on all National Forest Land

Posted by on Jun 8, 2016 @ 7:39 am in Conservation | 0 comments

As the summer season begins, the National Forest Service reminds visitors that all fireworks, exploding targets and other pyrotechnic devices are prohibited on all National Forest land, year-round, regardless of weather conditions or holidays. Forest Fire Management Officer Riva Duncan emphasizes that, “Fireworks can and will cause wildfires because they burn very hot. Even fireworks that seem innocent, like sparklers, can cause wildfires.” Regulations are strictly enforced to protect the public and natural resources....

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Be a Citizen Scientist

Posted by on Jun 7, 2016 @ 11:32 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Even if being a scientist isn’t your day job, there are lots of ways to contribute to scientific research about the natural world. From counting monarch butterflies to studying plant growth and tweeting earthquake locations, citizen science empowers the public to help scientists conduct and inform research. And it’s making a huge difference. Monarchs are an iconic backyard species, and they need our help. Populations of these gorgeous orange and black butterflies have been declining for several reasons like climate change, pesticides and...

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Land trust hosts June Jamboree on Roan Mountain

Posted by on Jun 7, 2016 @ 8:02 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Land trust hosts June Jamboree on Roan Mountain

“It’s inspiring to me to look out over these lands we protected,” Marquette Crockett said. “There’s a lot of love poured in here.” Crockett, the Roan Mountain Stewardship director for the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy, works for that reaction – to protect the thousands of acres of land in the viewshed of Highlands of Roan and the Appalachian Trail, which slips over its ridge tops. The nonprofit land trust based in Asheville was launched in 1974 to conserve the Highlands of Roan, a 24,000-acre swath of globally rare mountaintop...

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Trekking in Peru: far from the crowds assailing Machu Picchu

Posted by on Jun 6, 2016 @ 11:54 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

We are two days into our high-altitude trek through the Peruvian Andes before our little band of travelers sees any other sign of human life. Until then, a herd of llamas, two donkeys, our slightly eccentric guide, a chirpy band of porters, a mule driver and a chef have been our only company on a trek through splendid, snow-capped isolation. The absence of tourists is a relief, given we are in Inca territory, just days’ walk from the popular tourist site of Machu Picchu. There is not a lot of life in the moonscape of rugged mountain...

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Park Rangers warn of hiking dangers as Phoenix continues to set new heat records

Posted by on Jun 6, 2016 @ 7:15 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Park Rangers warn of hiking dangers as Phoenix continues to set new heat records

The mercury rose to a blistering 115 degrees in Phoenix, AZ this weekend. This may be the best advice if you’re thinking about hiking on a weekend like this, “Respectfully, don’t come, it’s too hot, this is not the time to be hiking,” said ranger Mark Sirota. He has seen too many rescues after hikers got dehydrated on a days like this. “Once they’re dehydrated they start doing things that they normally wouldn’t do, they roll their ankles, they slip, they fall, they break bones, they hit their...

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The joy and dangers of hiking Hong Kong’s trails

Posted by on Jun 5, 2016 @ 2:13 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The growth in the popularity of hiking in Hong Kong has seen a spike in the number of rescues, often due to walkers failing to take adequate precautions, ­experts say. The number of mountain search and rescue cases has more than doubled, rising from 138 in 2005 to 340 last year, according to the Fire Services Department, which conducts search and rescue missions on hiking trails. Meanwhile, large-scale mountain searches and rescues that require helicopters, police, firefighters and volunteers are also on the rise, based on figures from the...

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Is it worth hiking?

Posted by on Jun 5, 2016 @ 7:05 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

What is it? Just a nice long walk. How much does it cost? Probably an initial outlay of about $150 for some decent gear, and then free forever. What does it promise? Improved cardiorespiratory fitness, improved muscular fitness, weight control, better balance and – according to the president of the American Hiking Society – reduced stress and anxiety. What’s it actually like? Are you kidding? The hit of fresh air in your nostrils? The beauty of the countryside? The clearness of mind that comes from ditching everything and setting off into the...

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Four Tips for Choosing a Hiking Partner

Posted by on Jun 4, 2016 @ 8:51 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Going for a hike is a great way to enjoy our National Forests, and enjoying a hike alongside a great hiking partner can make your trip even better. So what should you look for when choosing a hiking partner? Below are a few things to consider when deciding who to join for a day on the trail. 1. Find a hiking partner who shares your expectations. A “great hike” means something different to everyone you ask. Whether you want to hike one or two miles along a bubbling stream to fish, or spend all day trekking up to an alpine pass to scope out...

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Aerial Operation Plucks Military Personnel Off Longs Peak In Rocky Mountain National Park

Posted by on Jun 4, 2016 @ 2:48 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

By mid-afternoon Friday, June 3, 2016, a band of military personnel that ran into trouble while training on Longs Peak in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado was safely airlifted off the top of the mountain by rangers. Park spokeswoman Kyle Patterson said that the group of 10 climbers late Thursday night radioed for assistance on Kiener’s Route on Longs Peak. “The group consists of a variety of military personnel affiliated with Fort Carson. This group was involved in a climbing training,” she said in a release earlier Friday....

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Join CMLC and Pardee for a Special Edition Guided Hiking Challenge 3 Hike at Trombatore – Sunday, June 12th

Posted by on Jun 3, 2016 @ 1:00 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Join Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy and Pardee Hospital in this special edition guided Hiking Challenge 3 hike. CMLC will be celebrating Pardee’s sponsorship of the White Squirrel Hiking Challenge with a presentation from special Pardee guests Sarah Philipp and Chelsea Darley. Sarah Philipp is an Athletic Trainer with Pardee Sports Medicine and will be talking with participants about the importance of using hiking poles when trail walking. Pardee Signature Care Center coordinator Chelsea Darley will be providing information on the...

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Cradle of Forestry Hosts Free Outdoor Activities on National Get Outdoors Day

Posted by on Jun 3, 2016 @ 7:53 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Cradle of Forestry Hosts Free Outdoor Activities on  National Get Outdoors Day

The Cradle of Forestry in America will celebrate National Get Outdoors Day, June 11, 2016, with outdoor skills demonstrations, activities and crafts. Admission to the site and all activities are free. The National Get Outdoors Day campaign encourages Americans, especially youth, to pursue healthy and active outdoor lifestyles, connect with nature, and embrace public lands. In this spirit, the Cradle of Forestry will showcase outdoor adventure and camp and trail skills in its scenic setting with a variety of activities on June 11 including:...

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Instead Of Cleaning Up Coal Ash Sites, North Carolina Legislators Want To ‘Bail Out’ Duke Energy

Posted by on Jun 2, 2016 @ 8:44 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

North Carolina’s biggest utility has 14 different coal ash storage sites in the state, and none of them are safe. That means the chemicals and heavy metals — including mercury and arsenic — in coal ash, a byproduct of burning coal for power generation, can leach into local water supplies. The safety issue was demonstrated in dramatic fashion a few years ago, when a coal ash storage pond ruptured, sending millions of gallons of poisonous sludge into North Carolina’s Dan River. Environmentalists have long been trying to force Duke Energy, the...

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Kephart Among 2016 Appalachian Trail Hall of Fame Inductees

Posted by on Jun 2, 2016 @ 9:46 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Kephart Among 2016 Appalachian Trail Hall of Fame Inductees

The sixth class of Appalachian Trail Hall of Fame honorees will be inducted on Friday, June 3, 2016, at the annual Appalachian Trail Hall of Fame Banquet at the Allenberry Resort in Boiling Springs, Pennsylvania. The 2016 Appalachian Trail Hall of Fame class honorees are Maurice J. Forrester, Jr. of Williamsport, PA; Horace Kephart of Bryson City, NC; Larry Luxenberg, of New City, NY; and Henry Arch Nichols, of Asheville, NC. Horace Kephart, a writer and outdoors advocate, was born in Pennsylvania in 1862. He spent considerable time as a...

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SPEX launches a new concept in hiking in Sedona

Posted by on Jun 2, 2016 @ 7:41 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hikers in Sedona, Arizona have a new option when it comes to exploring their deep thoughts out on the trail. Sedona Philosophy Experience (SPEX) has officially launched and is busy helping its customers navigate not only the trails of Sedona, but also the mindful philosophical discussions that hiking so naturally stimulates. “We are delighted to bring philosophy out of the classroom and onto the trail where it will benefit so many people,” said Andrea Houchard, one of four university professors who is behind the unique company. “Every person...

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Appalachian Trail by County: A river, a foot bridge and Happy Feet

Posted by on Jun 1, 2016 @ 10:54 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Bill and Laurie took the plural form of their last name “Foot” as their trail name when they through hiked the Appalachian Trail in 1987. Known as Happy Feet, the couple says the hike was life-changing and inspired them to give back to the AT. “We became trail maintainers, we served on the board of directors for our local club and we lead hikes and chaired committees,” Laurie said. “We had great fun and made great friends doing all of that.” But Bill wanted to do more. He loved bridges. The couple would...

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Old Rail Lines in Connecticut Make Great Trails

Posted by on Jun 1, 2016 @ 8:48 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Old Rail Lines in Connecticut Make Great Trails

With the Industrial Revolution in full swing in the early 1800s, it was only a matter of time before businesses and travelers in Connecticut seized upon a then-novel technology, the railroads. By 1899, there were 1,013 miles of track, with another 416 miles of trolley lines. Today, only 629 miles of passenger and freight rail are still in use in Connecticut; the remainder have fallen victim to the convenience of cars and trucks. So what happened to the other 800 or so miles of relatively flat rail bed? Well, quite of bit of it has found new...

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Nine Out of 10 Americans Tested Positive for Monsanto’s Cancer-Linked Weedkiller Glyphosate

Posted by on May 31, 2016 @ 4:22 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Nine Out of 10 Americans Tested Positive for Monsanto’s Cancer-Linked Weedkiller Glyphosate

So, if you participated in the glyphosate test project launched last year by the Detox Project and Organic Consumers Association, you probably failed. A staggering 93 percent of Americans tested positive for glyphosate, according to the test results, announced on May 25, 2016. What makes that figure even more alarming is that many of you who sent in urine samples for testing probably eat more organic than non-organic food. Which suggests that either your organic food has been contaminated and/or you’re being exposed to glyphosate via unknown...

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‘Packing It Out’ Crew Update: 100 Miles, 150lbs of Trash

Posted by on May 31, 2016 @ 10:21 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

‘Packing It Out’ Crew Update: 100 Miles, 150lbs of Trash

With their first post from the trail, the ‘Packing It Out’ crew gives an update on their mission to thru-hike the 2,600-mile PCT while collecting trash along the way. Packing It Out was formed late in 2014 when 24-year-old Seth Orme had a post-hike epiphany atop a North Carolina outcrop called, fatefully, Pickens Nose: Why not hike the Appalachian Trail and pick up every single piece of trash he sees along the way? With that, a three-man team was formed a year ago, and together they thru-hiked the 2,190 mile AT, ultimately picking up and...

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New Mount Diablo hiking guide unlocks secrets of hikes

Posted by on May 30, 2016 @ 6:17 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

New Mount Diablo hiking guide unlocks secrets of hikes

Many visitors are lured to Northern California’s Mount Diablo by its imposing presence – an ancient rock fortress between the Bay Area and San Joaquin Valley. Visitors come for panoramic views and challenging hikes or rides. But some have gotten sick and even died after underestimating the difficulty of some treks and overestimating their own abilities to navigate steep slopes on hot days. “Hiker’s Guide to Mount Diablo State Park” highlights 50 trails in the immensely diverse wilderness park surrounded by East...

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Hike on Turkey’s best trails for natural discoveries

Posted by on May 30, 2016 @ 7:09 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The best way to discover hidden beauties, greenery and a refreshing atmosphere is an intimate walk in nature. Recognized as a great way to get off the beaten track and feel the diversity of the country, walking in Turkey will lead you to the core of history in rural villages and cozy backstreets. This wonderful country invites you to go hiking with its fascinating scenery, different trails and predictable weather. It does not matter whether you want to see green places on land or find the turquoise sea at the end of your walking journey,...

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How a toxic junkyard was transformed into a national park

Posted by on May 29, 2016 @ 10:34 am in Conservation | 0 comments

The National Park Service is celebrating 100 years of protecting and promoting America’s most awe-inspiring natural resources. When you think of national parks, you may picture the Grand Canyon or the soaring trees of Redwood National Park. But not all getaway spots are that ancient. In the middle of Cuyahoga Valley National Park – where the Brandywine Falls cascade and natural rock ledges carve through trails – lies Beaver Marsh. Looking at the beauty that surrounds it, it’s hard to imagine this place as a garbage...

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A personal account of hiking the Israel National Trail

Posted by on May 29, 2016 @ 7:04 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The centerpiece of the Nifgashim Beshvil Israel project is a hike that spans the entire length of the country from Eilat on the Red Sea in the south to She’ar Yashuv, 1000 kilometers to the north, and the site of a 1997 military helicopter crash. If you do the entire hike it takes two months. It attempts to follow the path of the Israel National Trail, which has been listed as one of National Geographic’s 20 most epic trails, a hike that in itself is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. However, the Nifgashim project is much more than just a...

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Cradle of Forestry to Host Woodsy Owl’s Curiosity Club

Posted by on May 28, 2016 @ 3:35 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

The Cradle of Forestry in America in the Pisgah Ranger District announced that it will hold a nature and educational series titled “Woodsy Owl’s Curiosity Club” every Thursday this summer, beginning June 9, 2016 and ending August 11. Programs are held from 10:30 am to noon and 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm. “The Curiosity Club allows kids, ages 4 to 7, and their special adults to participate in a variety of outdoor-oriented activities, exploring a forest-related theme that engages young children in the natural world around...

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Watching out over wild, picturesque Linville Gorge

Posted by on May 28, 2016 @ 6:58 am in Conservation | 1 comment

Watching out over wild, picturesque Linville Gorge

What would you do with your life if you didn’t need money? It’s a popular contemplation and one that Kevin Massey, at age 45, has realized. He would tie his red hair back in a ponytail, arm himself with maps, hand tools, snacks and Gatorade, and perform backbreaking work to care for the Linville Gorge Wilderness, one of the few truly wild places in the East. But he still needs money, and lucky for Massey, he’s got the job he would do regardless. With a part-time position as Wild South Linville Gorge stewardship coordinator and part-time work...

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