10 rivers may deliver bulk of ocean plastic

Earth’s oceans have a big plastic problem. They receive roughly 8 million metric tons of plastic waste every year, much of which can drift around for decades or centuries without truly decomposing. Instead, it just crumbles into smaller pieces known as microplastics, which often fatally trick marine wildlife into eating them. Some ocean plastic is discarded...

Learn More

Ambitious Northern Ireland greenway plans continue to gather momentum

“The greenway here is unbelievable. It’s opened up Victoria Park to Orangefield and all along it people are enjoying it. It’s great for people’s physical well-being, mental well-being – everything.” The development of greenways – car-free paths and trails for walkers and cyclists – has continued for Northern Ireland in the...

Learn More

New Chimney Rock trail restores access to falls

For decades, one of the primary attractions at Rutherford County’s Chimney Rock Park was the loop formed high atop the mountain ridge on the west flank of the Hickory Nut Gorge by the Cliffside Trail and the Skyline Trail. This loop took hikers across perilously narrow rock ledges and over the flowing waters of Falls Creek, just above the precipitous 400-foot drop...

Learn More

Hiking Beartooth Wilderness high on list of Montana adventures

Crawl from your warm sleeping bag out the tent door, into the darkness and predawn wind whipping across the plateau. Look up at the cathedral of the sky. Watch the whirlpool of constellations spin overhead. Hold your breath. It’s hard not to feel vertigo in the majesty of Montana’s wilderness. Whether you seek the rocky heights of a 10,000-foot peak or an endless chain...

Learn More

Western NC’s Fire Towers Provide Panoramic Mountain Views

At the summit, they found a good excuse to set down their packs and stretch their toes: There, a tall, rusty Tinkertoy of a fire tower, known simply as Shuckstack, cast a portentous shadow. Another hiker, having just descended steps that didn’t seem nearly sturdy enough to hold him, brushed past Peter and Brad, declaring, “I might be the last one to climb that tower...

Learn More

Conserving Carolina’s Trail Crew builds, maintains sustainable trails

Every Wednesday, the Trail Crew convenes to create and to improve Conserving Carolina’s extensive network of trails in the Hickory Nut Gorge, under the direction of Conserving Carolina’s trails coordinator, Peter Barr. “Our crew is now fondly called Conserving Carolina ‘Rock Crushers’ Trail Crew, because we hand made so much gravel,” says Peter. “We make gravel to harden...

Learn More

More than 150 roads in need of repair around SC’s Francis Marion National Forest

The drive to meet Mark and Ronnie Morris is bumpy. Potholes pepper the roads through the Francis Marion National Forest where the brothers have lived their entire lives. They say the conditions are worse than they’ve ever seen them. “If you don’t have four-wheel drive you can’t make it,” Mark Morris explained. Ronnie described the roads like something from a war movie....

Learn More

Worrying new research finds that the ocean is cutting through a key Antarctic ice shelf

  A new scientific study has found that warm ocean water is carving an enormous channel into the underside of one of the key floating ice shelves of West Antarctica, the most vulnerable sector of the enormous ice continent. The Dotson ice shelf, which holds back two separate large glaciers, is about 1,350 square miles in area and between 1,000 and 1,600 feet...

Learn More

Pentagon Patroclus Vest

Made from lightweight and breathable Nylon Taslon Ripstop material, the Patroclus Vest from Pentagon features warm duck down insulation, full front YKK VISLON zipper, fleece lined collar for added environmental protection and two roomy hand pockets with soft inner lining for extra comfort. In addition to that, the vest comes with a YKK secured chest pocket with internal...

Learn More

“Camping in the Old Style” Re-created at the Cradle of Forestry

The Cradle of Forestry in America invites the public to explore a re-created campsite of the early 1900’s during its “Camping in the Old Style” event, Saturday, October 14, 2017. A classic camping interpretive team known as the Acorn Patrol demonstrate the low-tech/high-skill approach as practiced in the outdoors during what some historians consider the...

Learn More

Trump moves to cancel landmark Obama climate change rule

The Trump administration officially moved to kill the Obama-era climate change rule for power plants, fulfilling a campaign pledge but setting off what is expected to be a bitter legal battle between the EPA and several states, health and environmental groups. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt signed an agency proposal to repeal the Clean Power Plan, which would have sped...

Learn More

Congressman Introduces Legislation To Extensively Rewrite Antiquities Act

  A Utah congressman long unhappy with the authority given presidents under The Antiquities Act to establish national monuments has introduced legislation that would extensively rewrite the century-old act. If enacted, the rewrite would limit the purposes for which monuments could be created, require environmental review of proposed designations, and allow...

Learn More

There’s enough wind energy over the oceans to power human civilization, scientists say

New research finds there is so much wind energy potential over oceans that it could theoretically be used to generate “civilization scale power” — assuming, that is, that we are willing to cover enormous stretches of the sea with turbines, and can come up with ways to install and maintain them in often extreme ocean environments. It’s very unlikely that we would ever...

Learn More

How the Mt. Everest region is thriving two years after the deadly earthquake

In a colorful Buddhist monastery perched at 12,787ft, Nima Sherpa sits cross-legged on a brocade pillow, calmly chanting mantras in a monotone at 5am. It’s a daily ritual the monk wrapped in a burgundy robe has been practicing at the Tengboche Monastery in Nepal’s remote Khumbu region for the last 15 years and one that makes his mind and body feel purified whenever he’s...

Learn More

The Most Underrated Endurance Workout? Hiking

Have you ever met anyone who regretted taking a good, hard day hike? Me neither. There’s something special about moderately paced movement through nature that leaves one feeling refreshed, renewed, and satisfied. Recent studies show that a walk in the woods—especially at the right tempo—is a superb way to build endurance and strength. For a study published earlier this...

Learn More

How Armenia Plans to Become the Next World-Class Hiking Destination

Dilijan National Park stretches across the mountains of Armenia’s northeastern Tavush region, 92 square miles of beech and oak tree forests and pine-covered slopes that delve into deep gorges with wandering streams and rivers. Brown bear and deer are frequent park visitors, lured by the scent of blackcurrants and gooseberries, while rarer flora like Armenian Saint...

Learn More

The Yosemite most people never see: 10 dazzling hikes

Gazing at the spectacular scenery surrounding Yosemite’s Hetch Hetchy reservoir, one can’t help but marvel. Nature has endowed Tuolumne County with such splendor, it almost doesn’t seem fair. That these riches are so easily accessed by hiking trails makes us all the luckier. Before this lake was formed at Yosemite National Park, Hetch Hetchy was a glacier-carved,...

Learn More

How to not die in the Smokies

When you think about the Great Smoky Mountains, you might conjure grand vistas, verdant forests or majestic elk. Your thoughts might not immediately jump to death and destruction. But that is exactly what adventure travel writer David Brill of Morgan County, Tenn., dives into with his new book, Into the Mist: Tales of Death and Disaster, Mishaps and Misdeeds, Misfortune...

Learn More

Humans Today Have Even More Meanderthal DNA Than We Realized

An international team of researchers has completed one of the most detailed analyses of a Meanderthal genome to date. Among the many new findings, the researchers learned that Meanderthals first mated with modern humans a surprisingly long time ago, and that humans living today have more Meanderthal DNA than we assumed. Before this new study, only four Meanderthal...

Learn More

House Committee on Natural Resources votes to gut the Wilderness Act

  A stealth attack on the Wilderness Act comes in the form of H.R. 3668, the Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) Act, introduced by Rep. Jeff Duncan of South Carolina. It would affect every wilderness in the nation. On September 15, 2017 the SHARE Act was passed by the Committee on Natural Resources and sent to the full House of...

Learn More

The best hiking trails in Metro Detroit

The leaves are changing and it’s the perfect time to enjoy the many hiking trails around metro Detroit. Many of the area’s Metroparks and nature preserves offer scenic views and multiple trails for hiking, cycling, cross country skiing, and horse riding. A linked map marks the pathways that offer all or some of these. The map spans as far north as Kensington Metropark to...

Learn More

The Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests: An Economic Powerhouse for Western North Carolina

  If you’re one of the 4.6 million people who visit the Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests each year, you already know how incredible this corner of the Southern Appalachians is. Perhaps you’ve paddled down the Tuckasegee River, climbed at Looking Glass, or hiked in Linville Gorge. No matter your preferred form of adventure, you know the Nantahala-Pisgah...

Learn More

Marci Spencer – Author and Historian

Healer of bodies and forests   A retired nurse practitioner, Marci Spencer is the author of Clingmans Dome: Highest Mountain in the Great Smokies, Pisgah National Forest: A History, and the recently released Nantahala National Forest: A History all published by The History Press. Her children’s book, Potluck, Message Delivered: The Great Smoky Mountains Are...

Learn More

Cradle of Forestry Hosts Forest Festival Day and Woodsmen’s Meet October 7

The Cradle of Forestry invites people of all ages to celebrate the forest heritage of western North Carolina during the annual Forest Festival Day on Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017 from 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. This is the Cradle’s largest event of the year. This activity-filled, family event commemorates the traditions of mountain living and craft in the Cradle’s unique...

Learn More

Great Smoky Mountains National Park to Reopen Chimney Tops Trail October 6

Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials will open the Chimney Tops Trail to a newly developed observation point starting Friday, October 6, 2017. The entire trail has been closed to the public since the Chimney Tops 2 Fire event occurred in late November 2016. “We are excited to complete the work on the Chimney Tops Trail in time for the fall color season in Great...

Learn More

Death of gas and diesel begins as GM announces plans for ‘all-electric future’

After nearly a century of building vehicles powered by fossil fuels, General Motors — one of the world’s largest automakers — announced October 2, 2017 that the end of GM producing internal combustion engines is fast approaching. The acceleration to an all-electric future will begin almost immediately, with GM releasing two new electric models next year and an additional...

Learn More

Oral Rabies Vaccine (ORV) Program – Air Drops Over Western North Carolina

Beginning in the late 1970s, a strain of rabies virus associated with raccoons rapidly spread along the east coast of the United States northward from Florida and southward from West Virginia. As the virus invaded new areas, there was an explosive increase in rabid raccoons, with many states reporting over 500 cases in a year. Compounding the problem, raccoon-variant...

Learn More

Earthjustice Wins 16-Year-Long Battle to Protect 50 Million Acres of Forests

  A decades-long fight over a landmark rule protecting wild forests nationwide took another successful–and possibly final–turn after a U.S. district court threw out a last-ditch attack by the state of Alaska against the Roadless Rule. Adopted in the closing days of the Clinton administration, the Roadless Rule prohibits most logging and road construction in...

Learn More

Good news! Global carbon emissions stayed mostly flat in 2016.

This marks the third year in a row with no increase in CO2 emissions, according to a new report published from the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency. That’s largely due to a shift away from coal to natural gas, which tends to produce more electricity more efficiently, and renewable energy. The five largest emitting countries plus the European Union, which...

Learn More

National parks set their sights on being litter-free

  “I know how to eliminate litter at national parks,” he told the Undersecretary of the Interior. “How? How?” he responded, animated. The Interior’s collective yearning to take on littering could create a template that could be effective for park districts across America. The Interior manages the National Park Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and...

Learn More

Nantahala, Pisgah forest planning focuses on recreation

The Access Fund is one of many members of the two collaborative groups – the Nantahala-Pisgah Forest Partnership and the Stakeholders Forum – working on recommendations for the Nantahala and Pisgah Plan Revision. The years-long project holds the potential to change the way millions of people use the two giant forests that spread across the mountains of Western North...

Learn More

In the Teton Wilderness, where two oceans begin

The camp is located 22 miles from the Turpin Meadow trailhead along the famous plateau where North Two Ocean Creek makes a baffling break into two, sending Pacific and Atlantic creeks toward their namesake oceans. It’s usually reachable terrain by mid-June, once the sunshine in the high country has erased the last signs of winter atop Trail Creek Pass. Right now, in the...

Learn More
Page 3 of 151« First2342040Last »