News

Smokies National Park to Host “Women’s Work” Event

Posted by on Jun 9, 2017 @ 7:01 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Smokies National Park to Host “Women’s Work” Event

On Saturday, June 17, 2017, Great Smoky Mountains National Park will host the annual Women’s Work Festival at the Mountain Farm Museum. This event honors the vast contributions made by the women of Southern Appalachia showcasing traditional work led by women on mountain farms in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The event is from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 pm. Demonstrations among the historic buildings will include hearth cooking, soap making, corn shuck crafts, and spinning. Exhibits of artifacts and historic photographs will provide...

read more

Guide to Peru adventure travel and action sports

Posted by on Jun 8, 2017 @ 12:09 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Guide to Peru adventure travel and action sports

Located in the west of South America, Peru offers adventures as varied as its climate and regions. With arid coastal deserts, cooler Andean highlands and tropical rainforest it plays host to spectacular scenery and exciting activities. The landscape of Peru can be divided into three regions; the coast, the highlands and the rainforest. The coast is a narrow strip of land running from the north to the south on the east side of the country; it is bordered by the Pacific Ocean on the east and the Andes mountains on the West. The land here is dry...

read more

Appalachian pipeline emissions would be equal to 42 coal-fired power plants

Posted by on Jun 8, 2017 @ 6:35 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Appalachian pipeline emissions would be equal to 42 coal-fired power plants

Given the crisis of global climate change, anti-fossil fuel activists have sought to draw attention to the climate impacts of extracting, transporting, and burning natural gas, whose primary component is methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Oil Change International, a nonprofit research group, studied one of the largest proposed natural gas pipelines in the Appalachian region and came away with precise calculations of the pipeline project’s climate impact. The Rover Pipeline, owned by Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) — the same company behind the...

read more

Through the Devil’s Doorway: Hiking the Bluff Trails of Wisconsin’s Devil’s Lake State Park

Posted by on Jun 7, 2017 @ 1:46 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Through the Devil’s Doorway: Hiking the Bluff Trails of Wisconsin’s Devil’s Lake State Park

Known as one of the Midwest’s premier rock climbing parks, Devil’s Lake State Park is also a hiker’s dream. This 9,000 acre park includes a 360 acre natural lake, banked on two sides with 500 foot tall bluffs, and over 20 miles of hiking trails ranging from easy to difficult. Located just outside of the town of Baraboo, Wisconsin (only about 40 minutes northwest of the Capital city of Madison), the park is within the Baraboo Hills, a national natural landmark. These hills are over 1.6 billion years old, and were once part of the Baraboo...

read more

U.S. Forest Service to Hold Open Houses on Pisgah & Nantahala Forest Plan Revision

Posted by on Jun 7, 2017 @ 7:17 am in Conservation | 0 comments

U.S. Forest Service to Hold Open Houses on Pisgah & Nantahala Forest Plan Revision

The U.S. Forest Service will hold open houses across the Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests from late June to early August, 2017 to provide the public with opportunities to talk with Forest Service staff about local issues, district projects, and the Nantahala and Pisgah Forest Plan revision. “Public attendance at meetings like these helps us to understand your needs, concerns, and values and helps you understand Forest Service programs and activities,” explains Allen Nicholas, Forest Supervisor for National Forests in North...

read more

Carbon Dioxide Set an All-Time Monthly High

Posted by on Jun 6, 2017 @ 12:09 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Carbon Dioxide Set an All-Time Monthly High

With May in the books, it’s official: carbon dioxide set an all-time monthly record. It’s a sobering annual reminder that humans are pushing the climate into a state unseen in millions of years. Carbon dioxide peaked at 409.65 parts per million for the year, according to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It’s not a surprise that it happened. Carbon dioxide levels at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii peak in May every year. The news comes one day after President Trump announced his plan to pull out of the world’s...

read more

Allemansrätten, the Swedish right to roam the countryside, is guaranteed by the constitution

Posted by on Jun 6, 2017 @ 6:37 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Allemansrätten, the Swedish right to roam the countryside, is guaranteed by the constitution

In Sweden everyone has the legal right to walk, cycle, ride, ski and camp almost anywhere in nature. “This is made possible thanks to a Swedish right guaranteed by the constitution – freedom to roam. This right enables the Swedish people to experience nature and enjoy the beautiful Swedish wildlife,” says the president of Visit Sweden USA. Known as allemansrätten (meaning “everyman’s right”), the right of public access gives people the freedom to roam just about anywhere in the countryside as long as they “Don’t disturb – Don’t destroy.”...

read more

Colorado launches online guide to 39,000 miles of every kind of trail

Posted by on Jun 5, 2017 @ 12:13 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Colorado launches online guide to 39,000 miles of every kind of trail

After two years of intensive planning, Gov. John Hickenlooper will unveil a comprehensive online map of more than 39,000 miles of trails across Colorado. Spanning 226 jurisdictions, the interactive map — at cpw.state.co.us/cts — marks the first run at gathering every hiking, biking and multi-use trail in Colorado in a single location. For years that trail info has been stitched across a patchwork of websites, field offices and guidebooks. The Colorado Trail Explorer, developed by Colorado Parks and Wildlife, includes 17,099 trails and 1,431...

read more

Author Explains Why Hiking Is More Popular Now Than Ever

Posted by on Jun 5, 2017 @ 7:02 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Author Explains Why Hiking Is More Popular Now Than Ever

People haven’t always enjoyed a nice walk in the woods (or up a mountain, or down into a canyon). Before the development of mass transportation, walking was a necessary part of daily life —  a chore. The idea of doing it for fun didn’t exist. But then horse-drawn omnibuses became common, and eventually so did trolleys, trains and personal cars. And then came the first hikers. “They’re able to reinvent this idea of walking as not something you do just out of necessity, but rather something you do for fun,” said Silas Chamberlin,...

read more

First rule of hiking: Don’t get lost. Second rule: Know what to do if you get lost.

Posted by on Jun 4, 2017 @ 11:50 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

First rule of hiking: Don’t get lost. Second rule: Know what to do if you get lost.

The summer is almost upon us and already there have been lost hikers and even a death after someone lost their footing. One thing is for certain, there are things you can do to reduce your risks while hiking. Anybody can get lost. It’s easy to do. You can get lost in the day time… forget a map, misread the trail, not pay attention, have too much fun. You can slide into the brush, trip on a log, rub up against poison oak or stinging nettles, turn your ankle or come home with ticks. The weather can change from hot to cold, from calm to...

read more

Agencies and Partners Launch #FindYourWay to Celebrate America’s National Trails and Wild & Scenic Rivers Systems

Posted by on Jun 4, 2017 @ 7:39 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Several federal agencies and their nonprofit partners announced the launch of #FindYourWay to celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the National Trails System and the Wild & Scenic Rivers acts in 2018. Over the next two years, #FindYourWay will invite visitors from all backgrounds to explore America’s trails and rivers. The National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Forest Service, and the Army Corps of Engineers have stewardship roles in the trails and rivers systems, from the...

read more

Local Students Help with Elkmont Historic District Project at Smokies National Park

Posted by on Jun 3, 2017 @ 12:05 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Local Students Help with Elkmont Historic District Project at Smokies National Park

Great Smoky Mountains National Park Rangers received help from local high school students in Elkmont to plant native trees. Recently, 19 students from Blount, Sevier, Cocke, and Knox Counties planted more than 400 trees in areas where cabins were removed along Jakes Creek in the Elkmont Historic District. By planting the native trees and shrubs, students are helping to restore the montane alluvial forest in Elkmont. Students planted red maples, white oaks, red oaks, redbuds, black gums, hackberries, and false indigo shrubs. “The soil was...

read more

Land called ‘top conservation priority’ purchased along Hump Mountain

Posted by on Jun 3, 2017 @ 7:12 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Land called ‘top conservation priority’ purchased along Hump Mountain

The Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy has purchased 324 acres of land it called “one of our top conservation priorities.” The acreage is in Carter County on the northern slope of Hump Mountain west of Banner Elk, N.C. Total purchase price was $1,621,120. “Our purchasing this tract ensures that future generations of hikers will be able to enjoy the beauty and tranquility of the Appalachian Trail on Hump Mountain,” said SAHC executive director Carl Silverstein. The land comes within 500 feet of the AT, and purchasing it will ensure...

read more

National Park Getaway: Valles Caldera National Preserve

Posted by on Jun 2, 2017 @ 6:59 am in Conservation | 0 comments

National Park Getaway: Valles Caldera National Preserve

Among the newest additions to the National Park System, the 88,900-acre Valles Caldera National Preserve is a surprising gem at the top of the Jemez Mountains in north-central New Mexico that helps earn the state its motto—“The Land of Enchantment.” Valles Caldera National Preserve enchants visitors with its stunning natural beauty and rich human history. Recreational activities include hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, fishing, scenic drives, as well as cross-country skiing and snowshoeing in the winter. The preserve encompasses a...

read more

Cradle of Forestry Announces Junior Forester Program

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 @ 12:19 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Cradle of Forestry Announces Junior Forester Program

The Cradle of Forestry in America will offer a Junior Forester program for boys and girls ages 8-12 years old. This outdoor-oriented experience will be held every Wednesday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. from June 14, 2017 to August 9 at the Cradle of Forestry site in Pisgah National Forest. The Cradle of Forestry Junior Forester program combines learning new skills with discovery and reflection. This year, each week focuses on a different type of scientist that works in our forests. While participating in hands on activities, Junior Foresters...

read more

The Ultimate Guide to Monument Valley

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 @ 6:36 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Ultimate Guide to Monument Valley

With sandstone buttes, colossal mesas, and panoramic vistas, Monument Valley is one of the USA’s iconic landscapes. Sure, it’s possible to drive right through the Valley, visiting the main sites in just two or three hours, but if you really want to explore it, consider spending at least a day here. There are even quick excursions and scenic drives in the nearby area, if you are looking for even more activities to fill your time. Located on the Utah-Arizona border, Monument Valley is part of the Colorado Plateau. It is not officially a...

read more

Glacier Bay National Park’s New Totem Poles

Posted by on May 31, 2017 @ 4:58 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Glacier Bay National Park’s New Totem Poles

At Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, the glory of nature is on display. The park is packed with 3.3 million acres of glaciers, wildflowers and water. But the area’s indigenous people haven’t always been celebrated. The Huna Tlingit people, whose ancestors lived in what is now the park, have had a contentious history with the National Park Service. But the relationship has improved in recent years. Now, in honor of the Huna Tlingit’s connection to the area, two gigantic totem poles—each weighing 2,000 pounds and rising 20...

read more

Explore Five Amazing Hiking Trails in Parks Across Brazil

Posted by on May 31, 2017 @ 7:09 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A report by the World Economic Forum (WEF) shows that from a list of 136 countries, Brazil appears first in potential natural resources, and a large part of that is the amazing terrain and diverse parks that the South American giant has to offer. The Ibitipoca State Park is a forested state park is Minas Gerais that is full of caves, canyons and waterfalls. Pico do Pião is the highlight but the area is full of trails like Prainha, Ponte de Pedra and Cachoeira dos Macacos. In English Vale da Lua translates to “Moon Valley”, and the Chapada dos...

read more

What happens next for Bears Ears National Monument

Posted by on May 30, 2017 @ 12:32 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

What happens next for Bears Ears National Monument

By June 10th, 2017, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke will announce his decision on whether to recommend reducing or removing protection for Bears Ears National Monument. Just a couple weeks after President Trump signed an executive order targeting national monuments, Bears Ears National Monument’s May 26th comment period deadline has passed. In the coming weeks, the Trump administration will supposedly review those comments on its protected status. After that—by June 10th—Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke will make a recommendation about...

read more

Learn trail and hiking skills on National Trails Day

Posted by on May 30, 2017 @ 9:04 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Learn trail and hiking skills on National Trails Day

National Trails Day is coming up June 3, 2017, and officials at Shenandoah National Park are holding events on hiking skills. The Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, or PATC, says new and experienced hikers can learn new trail skills at its Trail Patrol “Beyond the Trailhead” event at the Byrd Visitor Center. There will be discussions on Leave No Trace outdoor ethics and wilderness first aid techniques as well as a demonstration of traditional tools used to maintain trails in the wilderness. There will also be a series of guided hikes...

read more

Trekking 1,400 Kilometres With Two Mules to Celebrate Canada

Posted by on May 29, 2017 @ 11:58 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Trekking 1,400 Kilometres With Two Mules to Celebrate Canada

When Ida DeKelver set off by foot from her ranch home in an isolated British Columbia valley, she was accompanied by two donkeys, Jack and Bill. Between them, they carried 140 pounds of provisions. She planned on riding Bill much of the way. Her destination was her hometown in Saskatchewan, some 1,400 kilometres to the east on the other side of the Rocky Mountains. On the morning of Sept. 15, 1967, she sent the children off to school before bidding adieu to her husband, Emil, who was left to carry out chores on their sheep ranch. DeKelver’s...

read more

Popular Spokane-area hiking trails expanded, improved

Posted by on May 29, 2017 @ 9:13 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Popular Spokane-area hiking trails expanded, improved

Hikers and mountain bikers are out for a pleasant surprise when they make their next visit to some of the Spokane, Washington area’s most popular trail systems. Agencies and growing stable of trained volunteers have been quietly chipping away in recent years at improving old trails and building new ones on county, state and federal areas. The results are impressive at destinations such as Riverside State Park, Spokane County conservation areas and Fishtrap Lake, all of which are currently green and bright with blooming wildflowers. Many of...

read more

New book explores family-friendly hiking in Maine

Posted by on May 28, 2017 @ 12:01 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

New book explores family-friendly hiking in Maine

Where should you hike with the kids next? That’s the question a new hiking guide by Bangor Daily News outdoors columnist Aislinn Sarnacki seeks to answer. The recently released book “Family Friendly Hikes in Maine” features 35 easy hikes from across the state. And if anyone knows hiking here in Maine, it’s Sarnacki. She estimates she’s hiked 250 trails in Maine since she began writing her popular weekly column “1-Minute Hikes,” 5½ years ago. The 35 hikes featured in the book allow Mainers to improve their own mental and physical health while...

read more

A Guide to Hiking SoCal’s San Gabriel Valley

Posted by on May 28, 2017 @ 6:55 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A Guide to Hiking SoCal’s San Gabriel Valley

In Southern California, you just can’t beat the mountain ranges. Whether you’ve got your eye on the peaks in the Santa Monica Mountains, the Santa Susanas, the San Bernardinos, the Sierras, the Verdugos or the San Gabriels … the Simi Hills or the San Rafael Hills … or the Temblor Range or the Coso Range (just to name a few) … these are some of the best (and the highest) ones to summit. But sometimes you don’t want the undertaking of climbing a mountain. Sure — climb every mountain, as they say. But you don’t have to only climb mountains....

read more

So much water pulsed through a melting glacier that it warped the Earth’s crust

Posted by on May 27, 2017 @ 11:32 am in Conservation | 0 comments

So much water pulsed through a melting glacier that it warped the Earth’s crust

NASA scientists detected a pulse of melting ice and water traveling through a major glacier in Greenland that was so big that it warped the solid Earth — a surge equivalent in mass to 18,000 Empire State Buildings. The pulse — which occurred during the 2012 record melt year — traveled nearly 15 miles through the Rink Glacier in western Greenland over four months before reaching the sea, the researchers said. “It’s a gigantic mass,” said Eric Larour, one of the study’s authors and a researcher at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “It is able...

read more

Best hikes of the Columbia River Gorge

Posted by on May 27, 2017 @ 6:36 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Best hikes of the Columbia River Gorge

Hiking season is underway in the Columbia River Gorge. While occasionally spectacular during the depths of winter, it’s the spring months of April, May and June when the Gorge reaches its scenic peak. Blooms of wildflowers, roaring waterfalls, panoramic viewpoints and mossy forest combine to offer singular hiking experiences up and down the national scenic area. To get you prepared for the season, here is a list of the 13 best overall hikes the Gorge has to offer, in consultation with the Friends of the Columbia River Gorge. As ever, it’s...

read more

1,100 miles: Discovering Florida’s hidden trail

Posted by on May 26, 2017 @ 12:24 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

1,100 miles: Discovering Florida’s hidden trail

There’s a dirt trail that starts on the fringe of the Everglades and stretches the length of Florida. It’s a footpath, really, that runs under swamps and over roots, along rivers, and through the barren, still remains of wildfires. Dozens of hikers head to the trail’s start every year, a small plaque engraved in stone behind a visitor’s center on U.S. 41 halfway between Naples and Miami. Few of them make it to the end, to the northern terminus 1,100 miles away, among the faded brick ruins of a long abandoned military fort off Pensacola...

read more

Memorial Day Weekend Kicks Off Vermont’s Hiking Season

Posted by on May 26, 2017 @ 7:17 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Memorial Day Weekend Kicks Off Vermont’s Hiking Season

The holiday weekend is traditionally the start of the hiking season in Vermont. Hiking is one of the state’s top summer tourism draws and the Green Mountain Club (GMC) estimates 200,000 people visit The Long Trail each year. The official protectors and maintainers of the Long Trail, the 107-year-old Green Mountain Club is the premier Vermont hiking organization with numerous hiking guides and maps available to Vermonters and visitors alike. From its rocky summits to its gentle valleys, Vermont is home to hundreds of miles of hiking...

read more

New ‘Hiking Alaska’ book offers more routes, more color — and more heft

Posted by on May 25, 2017 @ 11:59 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

New ‘Hiking Alaska’ book offers more routes, more color — and more heft

Just in time for the start of another hiking season, the third edition of the venerable guidebook “Hiking Alaska” has hit the shelves. It’s easily the most comprehensive statewide resource for residents and visitors who are looking for the best places to put their feet to the ground. Author Mollie Foster has greatly expanded the book from previous editions. The new version is nearly 100 pages longer than the last, which came out in 2006, and includes significant changes. Foster said that the new version “received an...

read more

Francis Marion National Forest a great escape

Posted by on May 25, 2017 @ 7:25 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Francis Marion National Forest a great escape

Centered directly between South Carolina’s top two tourist destinations, Charleston and Myrtle Beach, the Francis Marion National Forest’s nearly 260,000 acres sprawl across Berkeley and Charleston counties and have enhanced the lives of visitors and residents for decades. Officially designated in 1936, the area is named in honor of the fabled American Revolutionary War hero. In the historic forest, the bright lights and noise of city life give way to peacefulness and calm. Dog walkers, runners, campers, bikers, hikers, horseback riders,...

read more

The Road Mistaken: 6 Common Mistakes New Hikers Make

Posted by on May 24, 2017 @ 11:30 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Road Mistaken: 6 Common Mistakes New Hikers Make

Trying any sport or hobby for the first time can be nerve-wracking; adjusting to a new set of rules, lingo, setting, and even physical demands can stir up chaos in our already frazzled brains, making us reluctant to try new and exciting things. Hiking is an activity that continues to be a learning process. No matter how many summits you reach, you still find yourself encountering situations that you could’ve been better prepared for, or those you would never have seen coming, which is what adds to the sense of adventure and exploration of the...

read more

Interior Dept. censors climate change from news release on coastal flooding

Posted by on May 24, 2017 @ 7:06 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Interior Dept. censors climate change from news release on coastal flooding

The Department of the Interior deleted a line explaining how climate change drives sea level rise from the news release accompanying a new study on coastal flooding. Last week, six scientists published a journal article, “Doubling of coastal flooding frequency within decades due to sea-level rise,” which explains that coastal flooding will be much worse than previously expected, explicitly citing the role of “climate change.” Since three of the scientists were from the Interior Department’s U.S. Geological Survey, the USGS sent out a press...

read more

Hiking trail improvements are on track in NY

Posted by on May 23, 2017 @ 11:26 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hiking trail improvements are on track in NY

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced $2 million in funding for projects to improve and expand State Park hiking trails and outdoor recreational access projects in State Parks across New York. The 2017-18 budget dedicates nearly $2 million to 12 projects to improve and expand State Park hiking trails and outdoor recreational access projects across New York. The trails projects are part of the Governor’s historic commitment to improving parks and expanding access to outdoor recreation through the NY Parks 2020 Plan. “The New York State Parks...

read more

What Makes A Map Beautiful, According To A Parks Ranger

Posted by on May 23, 2017 @ 6:26 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

What Makes A Map Beautiful, According To A Parks Ranger

This national parks ranger and self-proclaimed cartomaniac shares favorites from his extensive map collection. Clambering in the back of a van or station wagon and driving with your folks to your nearest national park used to be a summer tradition. Certainly, it was for Matt Holly, who grew up to be a national park’s ranger. “I come from a family that loved visiting national parks,” he says. “There was just something about driving through that park entrance and having the ranger hand you a map. You made it. You’re here now. Let’s have some...

read more