News

Reported Snake Bites Nearly Quadruple in North Carolina

Posted by on May 3, 2017 @ 1:22 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Reported Snake Bites Nearly Quadruple in North Carolina

The Carolinas Poison Center, which offers assistance to venomous snake bite victims and the doctors who treat them, has reported a near quadrupling in North Carolina snake bite incidents compared to this time last year. According to a report filed by WLOS, the center received 71 calls throughout the month of April 2017. Compare that to the 19 calls the center received in April of last year. If venomous snake bites continue at the current rate, the state could see upwards of 500 incidents for the year. Some have speculated that the uptick in...

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Rainbow Falls Trail Rehabilitation Begins May 8, 2017

Posted by on May 3, 2017 @ 7:39 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials announced that a 2-year trail rehabilitation project will begin next week on the popular Rainbow Falls Trail. The trail will be closed May 8, 2017 through November 16, 2017 on Monday mornings at 7:00 a.m. through Thursday evenings at 5:30 p.m. weekly. Due to the construction process on the narrow trail, a full closure is necessary for the safety of both the crew and visitors. The trail will be fully open each week on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday and on federal holidays. The parking lot at the...

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2017 National Trails Day is June 3rd. Thousands of Events. One Shared Experience.

Posted by on May 2, 2017 @ 12:48 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

2017 National Trails Day is June 3rd. Thousands of Events. One Shared Experience.

Fill up your water bottle and lace up your hiking shoes—National Trails Day is right around the corner. National Trails Day is the only nationally coordinated event designed to unite all muscle-powered trail activities with the goal of connecting more people to trails. Every trail beckons adventure and has a story to share with any person willing to discover it, and American Hiking Society believes these trail experiences can improve the lives of every American. Each year, on the first Saturday of June, American Hiking Society and the trails...

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Festival to celebrate new relationship between Appalachian Trail and Roan Mountain

Posted by on May 2, 2017 @ 7:35 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Festival to celebrate new relationship between Appalachian Trail and Roan Mountain

The public is invited to visit the Roan Mountain community in Carter County, Tennessee for the debut of a new festival on Saturday, May 6, 2017 at 10 a.m. designed to celebrate the mountain town’s relationship with the Appalachian Trail and its enthusiasts. “This is a celebration of several community events in Roan Mountain,” a trail ambassador said. “It’s to celebrate Roan Mountain being designated as the 41st Appalachian Trail Community [as well as] the opening of the Roan Mountain Farmers Market and the dedication of the new stage at the...

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NCWF Governor’s Conservation Achievement Awards

Posted by on May 1, 2017 @ 12:07 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

NCWF Governor’s Conservation Achievement Awards

The North Carolina Wildlife Federation is accepting nominations for its annual Governor’s Conservation Achievement Awards. The awards honor individuals, businesses, organizations and groups who have exhibited an unwavering commitment to conservation efforts in North Carolina, and are the highest natural-resource honors given in the state. Nominees should demonstrate outstanding achievement in and dedication to conservation. Candidates are not required to hold professional positions related to conservation. Awards are given for...

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Dreams by Cliff Williams of Argyle Multimedia

Posted by on May 1, 2017 @ 8:58 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Dreams by Cliff Williams of Argyle Multimedia

On a recent visit to Little Bradley Falls, I happened to meet and chat with Cliff Williams of the local video production company Argyle Multimedia. As Cliff demonstrated to me that day, he is quite adept at operating camera drones, just one more means of achieving priceless photography of the great outdoors. Cliff just put together a compilation video that includes some of his drone footage, as well as timelapse and still photographs. It has a marvelous soundtrack by local musician Sharon Gerber. I asked Cliff if he would mind me sharing his...

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National park plans to connect two major redwood groves

Posted by on Apr 30, 2017 @ 8:35 am in Conservation | 0 comments

National park plans to connect two major redwood groves

Two of the largest and most ancient redwood groves in Redwood National Park — Lady Bird Johnson and Lost Man Creek — will be connected through the acquisition of the Berry Glen Trail property near the Prairie Creek Scenic Corridor. According to the Save the Redwoods League chief program officer, the corridor, which is 5.9 acres, will provide access to the groves directly from U.S. Highway 101. “It gives access to an entrance trail that would run up the hill and connect one side of the park to the other side across the highway,” he said. He...

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How to hike Costa Rica’s pristine Osa Peninsula

Posted by on Apr 29, 2017 @ 12:48 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

How to hike Costa Rica’s pristine Osa Peninsula

Situated on the Pacific coast, close to Costa Rica’s border with Panama, the Osa Peninsula should be on every nature lover’s bucket list. Touted as the most biologically intense place on Earth, it crams an astounding 2.5 per cent of the planet’s biodiversity into an area roughly twice the size of Hong Kong. More than three-quarters of it is protected, mostly by the Corcovado National Park, home to scarlet macaws, jaguars, tapirs and an astonishing array of other fauna and flora. By developing three distinct hiking trails through the area...

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Six ways to stay safe on mountain hiking trails

Posted by on Apr 29, 2017 @ 9:44 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

There was sad news this week for the Los Angeles hiking community. The body of Seuk “Sam” Doo Kim, famous for climbing Mount Baldy nearly 800 times, was found on the mountain after a few days missing. The San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department was in charge of the search. Its spokesperson said that to lose such an experienced hiker was rare. Usually, rescue operations are sent out to find people who were ill-equipped for their outing. Improvising a hiking route by going off-trail is a common reason hikers run into...

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Court Lifts Injunction Blocking Mexican Gray Wolf Releases

Posted by on Apr 27, 2017 @ 11:32 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Court Lifts Injunction Blocking Mexican Gray Wolf Releases

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled to lift a preliminary injunction blocking further releases of highly endangered Mexican gray wolves into the wild within New Mexico. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) can now resume wolf releases within the state. Mexican gray wolves, or lobos, are the most endangered gray wolf subspecies in the world. Lobos are facing low numbers and a genetic crisis in the wild. Limited genetic diversity in the wild can result in smaller litters and lower pup survival – a recipe for extinction. Releases of...

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In 4 days, a river that had flowed for millennia disappeared

Posted by on Apr 27, 2017 @ 7:01 am in Conservation | 0 comments

In 4 days, a river that had flowed for millennia disappeared

The latest consequence of climate change is rivers “pirating” each other’s water. Nearly a year ago, scientists noticed that the water level of the Slims River in British Columbia was extremely low. So they hopped into a helicopter and flew upstream to investigate. What they found startled them: A second, more powerful river, the Kaskawulsh, had stolen the Slims River’s water for itself. Three days later, the Slims was gone entirely. For centuries, meltwater from the Kaskawulsh Glacier had fed both the Slims and Kaskawulsh rivers. But in the...

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Fact-checking Trump’s Antiquities Act order

Posted by on Apr 26, 2017 @ 3:08 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Fact-checking Trump’s Antiquities Act order

“San Juan County is now the epicenter of a brutal battle over public lands,” Orrin Hatch, the senior senator from Utah, said as he stood before the Senate on April 24, 2017 and railed against former President Barack Obama’s end-of-term designation of the Bears Ears National Monument. Hatch spoke in anticipation of President Donald Trump’s order to “review” all national monuments designated since 1996, announced on April 26, starting with Bears Ears, located in rural San Juan County, Utah. The review will also include dozens of other monuments...

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Smokies Park Recruits Volunteers for Cataloochee Valley

Posted by on Apr 26, 2017 @ 9:45 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Smokies Park Recruits Volunteers for Cataloochee Valley

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is seeking volunteers to assist rangers with managing traffic and establishing safe wildlife viewing areas within the Cataloochee Valley region. Volunteers will receive information and training in wildlife behavior, safe viewing practices, and cultural history. Cataloochee is a remote mountain valley on the eastern edge of the park where remnants of early settlements are preserved. Surrounded by mountain peaks, the isolated valley is a popular, year-round destination. In 2001, elk were reintroduced into the...

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Help Hike 1,175 Miles in One Day

Posted by on Apr 26, 2017 @ 6:38 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Help Hike 1,175 Miles in One Day

On September 9, 2017, Friends of the Mountains to Sea Trail need you to collaborate with hundreds of others across North Carolina to hike and paddle the entire 1,175 miles of the MST in one day. Registration is now open for all legs – follow the instructions on mstinaday.org to sign up. MST in a Day commemorates a speech on September 9, 1977 by Howard Lee, then the NC Secretary of Natural Resources and Community Development. He told a National Trails Symposium in Waynesville that North Carolina should create a “state trail from...

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Great Smoky Mountains National Park Announces Synchronous Firefly Viewing Dates

Posted by on Apr 25, 2017 @ 11:29 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Great Smoky Mountains National Park Announces Synchronous Firefly Viewing Dates

Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials have announced the 2017 dates for firefly viewing in Elkmont. Shuttle service to the viewing area will be provided on Tuesday, May 30 through Tuesday, June 6. All visitors wishing to view the synchronous fireflies at Elkmont must have a parking pass distributed through the lottery system at www.recreation.gov. Every year in late May or early June, thousands of visitors gather near the popular Elkmont Campground to observe the naturally occurring phenomenon of Photinus carolinus, a firefly species...

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Conservation Partners Add 1,058 Acres Near Fiery Gizzard Trail To Tennessee’s South Cumberland State Park

Posted by on Apr 25, 2017 @ 6:54 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Conservation Partners Add 1,058 Acres Near Fiery Gizzard Trail To Tennessee’s South Cumberland State Park

The Conservation Fund and The Land Trust for Tennessee, in partnership with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and the Open Space Institute (OSI), announced the addition of 1,058 acres to South Cumberland State Park in Marion County. The acquisition connects more than 7,000 acres of protected public and private land, conserves forestland and cove habitat from future development, and protects scenic views from the Fiery Gizzard trail. The newly acquired land is adjacent to the Fiery Gizzard trail, which has been...

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Centuries-old Medicine Wheel draws many to national forest in Wyoming

Posted by on Apr 24, 2017 @ 11:52 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Centuries-old Medicine Wheel draws many to national forest in Wyoming

For centuries, the Medicine Wheel in the Bighorn National Forest in Wyoming has been used for prayer and vision quests by the Crow Tribe and other Native people. Visitors come from all over the world to hike up Medicine Mountain to the wheel, a National Historical Site managed by the Bighorn National Forest with guidance from the Medicine Wheel Alliance. The Medicine Wheel’s origins are uncertain. Many believe it was built by the Sheepeaters, a Shoshone band whose name is derived from their expertise at hunting mountain sheep. The most...

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A Bear’s-Eye View of Yellowstone

Posted by on Apr 24, 2017 @ 7:20 am in Conservation | 0 comments

A Bear’s-Eye View of Yellowstone

What do bears eat? How far do they roam? Find out in this interactive journey through the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. For the first time, trek into the wild backcountry of America’s first national park and see what it looks like from a bear’s point of view. Special cameras were attached to the tracking collars of two grizzlies and two black bears in Yellowstone. Massive and hungry, these bears prowl for food and confront danger along the way. It’s a matter of life and death for all of them. Tag along as National...

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On the trail of John Muir: Hiking in the naturalist’s footsteps around Northern California

Posted by on Apr 23, 2017 @ 11:45 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

On the trail of John Muir: Hiking in the naturalist’s footsteps around Northern California

John Muir had a passion for the outdoors that’s legendary and his extensive writings include accounts of his California adventures, ascending Mount Shasta in a snowstorm, walking all the way from San Francisco to Yosemite, and simply sauntering around Mount Wanda with his two daughters near his Martinez Ranch. Muir first arrived in San Francisco from New York by Steamer on March 27, 1868, according to newspaper accounts. At the time, he was 30 years old, and the story goes that Muir asked a carpenter on Market Street for the fastest...

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Why Hiking Matters

Posted by on Apr 23, 2017 @ 6:27 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Why Hiking Matters

Nature Deficit Disorder noun 1. The human cost of alienation from nature. Okay, it’s not actually in the dictionary… yet. The term was coined by journalist Richard Louv in his modern classic study Last Child in the Woods to describe the negative effects of a steep, one-generation slide in children’s exposure to the natural world. Louv points to the obvious reasons: safety concerns and the electronic communications that have turned childhood play inside out. What we once introduced to each other, child to child, is now a task for...

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Dog’s Death Spotlights Use of Cyanide ‘Bombs’ to Kill Predators

Posted by on Apr 22, 2017 @ 12:20 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Dog’s Death Spotlights Use of Cyanide ‘Bombs’ to Kill Predators

Sodium cyanide is considered by the Department of Homeland Security to be a potential weapon for terrorists. It’s a key ingredient in the M-44s, or “cyanide bombs,” used by Wildlife Services, an obscure agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, to kill wildlife predators on public and private lands in the West. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, an average of 30,000 M-44s, deployed by the federal government in concert with Western states and counties, are triggered each year. Baited to entice animals, they’re...

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The Earth just reached a CO2 level not seen in 3 million years

Posted by on Apr 22, 2017 @ 7:17 am in Conservation | 0 comments

The Earth just reached a CO2 level not seen in 3 million years

Some records aren’t meant to be broken — but when it comes to climate change, humans still haven’t gotten the memo. Last fall, the Earth passed a major climate milestone when measurements taken at Hawaii’s Mauna Loa Observatory showed that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide had passed — potentially permanently — 400 parts per million. This week, measurements taken from the same observatory show that yet another marker has been passed: Carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere, for the first time in modern record-keeping, has...

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America’s rapidly growing wind industry now employs more than 100,000 people

Posted by on Apr 21, 2017 @ 12:04 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

America’s rapidly growing wind industry now employs more than 100,000 people

More than 100,000 Americans now work in the wind industry, which is adding jobs much more rapidly than the economy as a whole, according to new data released this week. “We are hiring at a nine times faster rate than the average industry in the country,” Tom Kiernan, CEO of the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), a trade group, said at a press conference. According to the report, 2016 was the second year in a row that more than 8,000 megawatts (MW) of wind capacity was added to the grid. There is now 82,000 MW of total wind capacity in...

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Tips for Scoring a Hard-to-Get National Park Backcountry Permit

Posted by on Apr 21, 2017 @ 7:36 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Tips for Scoring a Hard-to-Get National Park Backcountry Permit

by Michael Lanza - The Big Outside The first time I backpacked in Yosemite National Park, more than 25 years ago, I applied months in advance for a permit to start at the park’s most popular trailhead, Happy Isles in Yosemite Valley—and I got it. I had no idea at the time how lucky I was. I’ve since been shot down trying to get permits for popular hikes in parks like Yosemite, Grand Canyon, and Glacier. But I’ve also learned a few tricks for landing coveted backcountry permits in those flagship parks—which all receive far more requests for...

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Kentucky coal company announces plans to build the state’s largest solar farm

Posted by on Apr 20, 2017 @ 11:50 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Kentucky coal company announces plans to build the state’s largest solar farm

A Kentucky coal company announced that it is planning to build a solar farm on a reclaimed mountaintop removal coal mine and that the project would bring both jobs and energy to the area. The company says the farm will give jobs to displaced coal miners. Berkeley Energy Group, the coal company behind the project, billed it as the first large-scale solar farm in the Appalachian region, which has been hit hard by the decades-long decline in the U.S. coal industry. The company, in partnership with EDF Renewable Energy, is currently conducting...

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Groundbreaking for final phase of ‘missing link’ of Foothills Parkway

Posted by on Apr 20, 2017 @ 7:03 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Groundbreaking for final phase of ‘missing link’ of Foothills Parkway

It’s the beginning of the end for the “missing link” of the Foothills Parkway. While crews still are completing the bridges along the 1.65-mile “missing link,” the paving of the entire 16-mile stretch of the Foothills Parkway between Walland and Wears Valley is scheduled to get underway this spring, with a groundbreaking ceremony featuring U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and U.S. Rep. John J. Duncan Jr., R-Tenn., among other dignitaries. “I grew up hiking, hunting and fishing in the Great Smoky Mountains, a national and Tennessee...

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Announcing a new champion for expanding the protection of precious natural resources and quality of life

Posted by on Apr 19, 2017 @ 12:22 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Announcing a new champion for expanding the protection of precious natural resources and quality of life

After a thoughtful and well considered process, the board of directors and staff of Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy (CMLC) in Henderson, Transylvania and parts of neighboring counties in North Carolina, and the Pacolet Area Conservancy (PAC) in Polk County, North Carolina, and the Landrum area of South Carolina, are excited to announce a consolidation of the two organizations. As sister organizations, each with deep roots and strong histories of conserving and preserving lands in the areas served, they are uniting to create a new...

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How to Prevent Injuries While Hiking

Posted by on Apr 19, 2017 @ 7:16 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

How to Prevent Injuries While Hiking

Hiking is great fun for all ages and sizes. Like any other person who has the zeal and passion for amazing views and high alpine trails, sometimes you forget that the activity is strenuous and has several potential dangers. If you have been hiking for some time, chances are you have had a taste of what it is to get one of more of the following injuries. An injury from hiking can be severe, and you have likely read all sorts of stories about even fatal hiking accidents. The good news is that fatalities are extremely rare, and even injuries...

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A new kind of green: Developers trade golf courses for hiking trails, gardens to draw buyers

Posted by on Apr 18, 2017 @ 11:53 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A new kind of green: Developers trade golf courses for hiking trails, gardens to draw buyers

A few decades ago, the go-to centerpiece for many master-planned communities was a golf course, with buyers clamoring for homes that backed up to the green whether they were avid players or not. Today, golf courses have faded from favor in new communities, giving way to more inclusive amenities, such as extensive trail networks, education centers and shared gardens that all give residents a connection to the outdoors as well as to their neighbors. Today, built amenities like pools, clubhouses and fitness centers remain popular. However, the...

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Walking the Garden of Ireland: Wicklow Way

Posted by on Apr 18, 2017 @ 6:26 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Walking the Garden of Ireland: Wicklow Way

The Wicklow Way is Ireland’s oldest way-marked long-distance walk. The 128 km long walk takes you through the incredible Wicklow Mountains and through County Wicklow, known as the Garden of Ireland. Wicklow Way passes through Wicklow Mountains National Park and through Glenmalure, the longest glacial valley in Ireland. You’ll also walk past Glendalough, a 6th century monastic city, which is one of the most important in the country. Some of the scenery may be familiar to you if you watch the TV show Vikings – you’ll pass Lough Dan and Lough...

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High Country Friends of the Blue Ridge Parkway Chapter – Clean-up of Tanawha Trail, April 23, 2017

Posted by on Apr 17, 2017 @ 8:27 am in Hiking News | 1 comment

High Country Friends of the Blue Ridge Parkway Chapter – Clean-up of Tanawha Trail, April 23, 2017

The High Country Chapter of FRIENDS of the Blue Ridge Parkway and Appalachian State Chapter, will host a clean up of the Tanawha Trail, Sunday, April 23, 2017 from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. The Tanawha Trail, stretching 13.5 miles from Julian Price Park to Beacon Heights, parallels the Blue Ridge Parkway on Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina. Tanawha, the Cherokee word for fabulous hawk or eagle, is an appropriate name for this trail that offers hikers spectacular views of distant mountains. Completed in 1993, the Tanawha Trail, like the final...

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What Gear Do I Need For Hiking?

Posted by on Apr 16, 2017 @ 11:55 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

What Gear Do I Need For Hiking?

Hikers in general are an eclectic lot. If you asked 15 different hikers what kind of hiking gear you need for a comfortable day hike, chances are that you will get 15 different answers. Of course, some of these answers will have a few items in common. You know, things like don’t go hiking in your flip flops. So preferably, the first piece of gear you will need will be good old fashioned hiking shoes. Others will tell you that all you need is your mind and natural instinct for survival. These are the kind of hikers who believe the universe...

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9 simple ways to be a better national parks visitor

Posted by on Apr 16, 2017 @ 7:48 am in Conservation | 0 comments

9 simple ways to be a better national parks visitor

America’s best idea, the national parks, continue to rise in popularity each year. 2016 saw the third year in a row where attendance to the national parks broke the previous all-time attendance record. Over 330 million visitors enjoyed the 417 national park sites last year, and that number is almost certainly going to increase yet again this year. With these kinds of attendance numbers, the National Park Service knows now more than ever is time to be a polite, respectful and considerate visitor to national parks. It is our duty to conserve...

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Public Library Card in Colorado Offers Hiking Perks

Posted by on Apr 15, 2017 @ 9:22 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Public Library Card in Colorado Offers Hiking Perks

When it comes to Colorado’s great outdoors, the Mesa County Public Libraries are here to help connect you to local scenic hiking trails at no cost. Bob Kretschman, Public Information Manager of the Mesa County Public Libraries said, “With a library card you can do a lot more than just check out books. This parks pass program lets you actually get out and experience what the state parks have to offer. ” All you need is your library card, and that’s it. Many different hiking passes are available for checkout including...

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