News

What kind of hiker are you?

Posted by on Jul 10, 2013 @ 5:28 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

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The Future of the Outdoor Industry

Posted by on Jul 10, 2013 @ 4:29 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Picture a huge corporation that has an absolutely enormous portfolio of incredibly valuable assets, a vast customer base, and a product that improves the health and quality of life of anyone who tries it. What if I told you that this company operates without anyone overseeing it all, without adequate financial resources, and without good collaboration among departments? Sounds a little far-fetched, huh? This is the reality when it comes to outdoor recreation resources in the United States. Think about it. Our country has a veritable...

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Appalachian Trail conference serves up full buffet of hiking fare

Posted by on Jul 10, 2013 @ 11:43 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Appalachian Trail conference serves up full buffet of hiking fare

Coming to Cullowhee, NC soon: four days of total immersion in everything trail. Camaraderie with fellow trail enthusiasts and taking in the region’s trails is the top draw that will land hundreds of hikers at the Appalachian Trail Conservancy Biennial conference held July 19-26 at Western Carolina University. But the real trail geeks will revel in nitty-gritty nuances of trail construction or philosophical discussions on the human phenomenon of recreation hiking. The event is hosted by the five southern Appalachian Trail maintaining clubs and...

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There’s a rumble in the jungle

Posted by on Jul 10, 2013 @ 4:25 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

There’s a rumble in the jungle. And it’s emanating from my stomach. Breakfast feels as if it was a long time ago, which would explain the gurgling coming from my mid-section. And even then, it was only a few pieces of sweet roti and a slice of cassava cake. I’ve hiked for miles since eating it. Perhaps sensing my hunger, or more likely hearing the evidence of it, Mr Epi stops on the jungle track and smiles back at me. “Don’t worry, Mr. Ben, we will have lunch soon. Edible ferns, eh?” Ah, edible ferns. My...

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Volunteers needed to repair hiking trails on Mount Monadnock

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 @ 4:26 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The annual Trails Week on Mount Monadnock, when volunteers help repair damage to trails on one of the most frequently hiked mountains in the world, is coming up. In the annual event, conservation professionals and volunteers from the Forest Society and New Hampshire State Parks gather to work on restoring the heavily used trails, overseeing all volunteers – no experience necessary. Work ranges from light tasks such as repainting blazes and cutting back brush to heavy work such as moving rocks and digging drainage ditches, to skilled work such...

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Are Hikers the Key to Saving Nature?

Posted by on Jul 8, 2013 @ 5:14 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Two years ago, a major survey revealed trouble in ecosystems of the United Kingdom (U.K.). A third of their functions—such as providing habitat for wild species and clean water for people—are declining. Now the same researchers show that protecting these ecosystem functions, and in particular outdoor recreation, significantly boosts the economic value of land. But putting those protections in place nationwide would be tricky. The 2011 UK National Ecosystem Assessment was the most comprehensive attempt to describe the state of a...

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Report: 3 of 4 U.S. Forest Service trails don’t meet standards

Posted by on Jul 8, 2013 @ 3:54 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Report: 3 of 4 U.S. Forest Service trails don’t meet standards

New federal reporting says only one-quarter of U.S. Forest Service trails meet the agency’s own standards as it attempts to catch up with a $524 million maintenance deficit. Volunteer groups like the Backcountry Horsemen of America and The Wilderness Society have stepped into that gap, but they worry the backlog will drive folks out of the woods. “We found problems with trail maintenance was undermining support for wilderness and public land in general,” said Paul Spitler, director of wilderness campaigns for The Wilderness Society. “They go...

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Washington World of Waterfalls

Posted by on Jul 7, 2013 @ 4:03 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

On a hot day, just looking at a waterfall can make you feel cooler – even if you have to hike a ways to do it. That at least was the prevailing feeling of those who flocked to Wallace Falls State Park near Gold Bar, WA recently. It’s an easy round-trip of only a mile from the parking lot to the closest set of falls, and a farther and steeper hike for the other cascades. “It’s a beautiful hike, beautiful falls and scenery, and so close,” said Brenda Wahl of Arlington, who was there with her husband and two...

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Humpback Rocks: A hiking hot spot on the Blue Ridge Parkway

Posted by on Jul 7, 2013 @ 8:17 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

For the inexperienced hiker, the task might be a bit rigorous. But for anyone, be it a novice or a seasoned mountain climber, the reward for reaching the peak is spine-tingling. Humpback Rocks, a hiker’s picturesque paradise, draws tourists from all over to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Located just outside Waynesboro, VA, about 6 miles down the parkway at the northern end, the 2-mile trail is considered one of the best representations of the natural and cultural resources seen along the parkway corridor. The monstrous rocks at the summit, hanging...

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Fluke Fire Burning Atop Sequoia Tree Leads To Small Closure Of Congress Trail At Sequoia National Park

Posted by on Jul 6, 2013 @ 8:25 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

A fluke fire burning in the crown of a giant sequoia has prompted the partial closure of the Congress Trail at Sequoia National Park. The fire is a hold-over from the Circle Meadow Prescribed Fire, conducted last summer to maintain a regular fire cycle that improves forest health by reducing the amount of dead, woody debris that can lead to larger, more intense fires, park fire officials said. An unusual combination of conditions enabled the fire to smolder through the winter and flare up as the weather became warmer and drier, they said,...

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Renovated Rosendale trestle reopens, reconnecting long-sundered Wallkill Valley Rail Trail

Posted by on Jul 6, 2013 @ 8:43 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Renovated Rosendale trestle reopens, reconnecting long-sundered Wallkill Valley Rail Trail

“A great day for Rosendale” is how supervisor Jeanne Walsh characterized the grand opening of the renovated railroad trestle spanning the Rondout Creek, linking the northern and southern portions of the nearly completed 24-mile Wallkill Valley Rail Trail from Gardiner to Kingston in New York. Four years after the Wallkill Valley Land Trust (WVLT) and the Open Space Institute (OSI) teamed up to purchase 11½ miles of railbed in the towns of Rosendale and Ulster, including the 940-foot-long, 150-foot-high trestle, it finally became possible for...

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New trail christened at Baker Lake, ID

Posted by on Jul 5, 2013 @ 2:53 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Baker Lake Trailhead northeast of Ketchum, ID gives recreationists access to serene views of crystal-blue alpine lakes and stunning vistas of the Boulder Mountains. Now, hikers have more options off of this versatile trailhead. The Idaho Trails Association worked to complete an extension of the Osberg Ridge trail system. Hikers can now begin at the Baker Lake Trailhead and trek into Ketchum via the newly completed Osberg/Warm Springs Ridgeline Trail. Association volunteers constructed a brand-new trail under the guidance of a U.S. Forest...

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What it’s like to be a national park ranger

Posted by on Jul 5, 2013 @ 7:02 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

What it’s like to be a national park ranger

As a park ranger for the National Park Service, you share the science, history and beauty of this natural wonder with thousands of visitors from around the world. National parks are like outdoor museums. They preserve some of America’s most beautiful and historic places. Park rangers protect the parks’ animals, plants, land, buildings, artifacts and people. They have a variety of jobs, depending on where they work and what they studied during college. Interpretive park rangers teach people about what makes each national park special and what...

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Appalachian Trail Biennial features music, culture, trails

Posted by on Jul 4, 2013 @ 4:47 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Appalachian Trail Biennial features music, culture, trails

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy’s Biennial Conference invites the public to attend live music, dancing, presentations about hiking trails, and a Cherokee storyteller July 21-25 at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, NC. Events each evening begin at 8 p.m. Nightly tickets are $7, and children younger than 12 are admitted free. Some of the highlights: • On July 21, Jennifer Pharr Davis, who holds the record for speed hiking the 2,180-mile Appalachian Trail, will talk about her experiences during the 46-day journey, while there will be a...

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Acadia reopens hiking trails

Posted by on Jul 4, 2013 @ 12:45 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hiking trails at Valley Cove and Jordan Cliffs in Acadia National Park, ME, closed earlier this spring to protect peregrine falcons, have been reopened. Falcons had been observed defending and engaging in courtship behavior at Valley Cove and Jordan Cliffs areas in April and May but have failed in their nesting attempt, Superintendent Sheridan Steele announced. The species is listed as an Endangered Species under the Maine Endangered Species Act. The closures at both cliff areas,had included the North Section of the Flying Mountain Trail and...

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Move your downward dog to the hiking trail this summer

Posted by on Jul 4, 2013 @ 9:51 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Move your downward dog to the hiking trail this summer

Considering hiking is truly about the journey, Steve Tsilimoss is taking each step in the right direction. The new Hiking Yoga program he’s introduced to the Vail Valley this summer brings eastern philosophy to the Western Slope of Colorado, where mindfulness meets movement. “I think this program adds an important element to what yoga was founded on — serenity in being one with yourself and with nature — simply finding peace,” said Tsilimoss, a certified yoga instructor. “I think being up here, or anywhere, outside on a beautiful day creates...

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One-night trips into the Smokies

Posted by on Jul 4, 2013 @ 3:00 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

For day hikers who want to take the next step or for a seasoned backpackers who can’t find the time or resources to make that long trip this year, outdoor author Jim Parham is offering up the solution that is just right: the short backpacking trip. His recently published book, Backpacking Overnights, details 50 one- and two-night trips in the Carolina Mountains. The premise of the book, and Parham’s philosophy, is that backpacking should be easy, accessible and fit into the schedule of the 9 to 5 working stiff. Instead of keeping the old...

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Maine author traces Thoreau’s steps in new hiking guide

Posted by on Jul 3, 2013 @ 6:25 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

“I have met but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking,” Henry David Thoreau wrote in the mid 1800s. Thoreau, a Massachusetts man, was many things — an author, philosopher, naturalist, historian, transcendentalist — but perhaps more importantly, he was a walker. And if Thoreau hadn’t learned “the art of walking,” his life and legacy would have been far different. “I think that I cannot preserve my health and spirits unless I spend four hours a day at least — and it is commonly more than that — sauntering...

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An angel for trekkers

Posted by on Jul 3, 2013 @ 11:33 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Wiffer’s Wayside is really just a condo. But for hikers trekking across North America on the Continental Divide Trail, it’s truly a luxury hotel. Sharon Henschen of Sidney, Ohio, is well-known to the hiking community as “Wiffer,” a trail name she was given because of her keen sense of smell. She makes her vacation condo – two miles north of Purgatory, CO at Durango Mountain Resort – a home away from home for hikers in need of rest. Henschen is one of many trail angels who exist along the Continental Divide Trail. Being a “trail angel” has...

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Wildflower Festival Coming To Cedar Breaks National Monument

Posted by on Jul 3, 2013 @ 9:23 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Wildflower Festival Coming To Cedar Breaks National Monument

At 10,000 feet and above, wildflowers bloom a wee bit later than, for instance, at sea level. That’s why Cedar Breaks National Monument’s 8th Annual Wildflower Festival is just beginning on July 6th. “During this spectacular display, visitors to the Monument will be able to see paintbrush and primrose, lupine and larkspur, and a spectrum of other flowers in meadows, woods, and marshes,” said Park Superintendent Paul Roelandt of Utah’s Cedar Breaks near Zion and Bryce Canyon. The festival runs through July 21. Volunteers will...

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5 Facts You May Not Know About California’s National Forests

Posted by on Jul 3, 2013 @ 9:08 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

In California, we rely on our National Forests for half of our water. That is one of the many reasons why the National Forest Foundation is working to restore the valuable resources in the forests that contribute to $37 billion in food and commodities. From their work in the Tahoe on aquatic, forest and rural communities to their work in the Angeles National Forest to reforest and restore native plant communities, they are improving the value of the lands that cover 20 percent of California. The California National Forests not only provide...

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Group of teachers, coaches take hiking challenge

Posted by on Jul 3, 2013 @ 8:34 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Group of teachers, coaches take hiking challenge

Hiking 34 miles in steamy, hot temperatures probably isn’t what most schoolteachers dream about doing on their summer vacation. For five Hampton School District teachers and coaches, though, it was their idea of a “challenge.” The group got together June 22 for the 17th annual Rachel Carson Trails Conservancy Challenge – a 34-mile hike between North Park and Harrison Hills Park in Harrison, PA through woods, across highways and in creeks. Hikers have 15 hours and 4 minutes to complete the challenge officially, but...

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Hike Florence Nature Preserve with CMLC

Posted by on Jul 2, 2013 @ 3:17 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hike Florence Nature Preserve with CMLC

Join Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy (CMLC) on Saturday, July 13, for a guided hike through CMLC-owned Florence Nature Preserve. Hikers will trek a lollipop-route, circumnavigating the Preserve to reach two of FNP’s most scenic locales: Rattlesnake Knob and Little Pisgah Point. These rock outcroppings feature scenic views of the rugged Hickory Nut Gorge. This hike is open to CMLC members as well as non-members, so bring a friend. Comprised of 600 acres on the southern slopes of Little Pisgah Mountain, Florence Nature Preserve was...

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Mount Hood book guides hikers safely around the mountain

Posted by on Jul 2, 2013 @ 1:32 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

A handy, pocket-size book that has long been in many a Portland hiker’s collection has gotten an upgrade and a facelift. “Around & About Mount Hood” is a new edition of an old classic that was first published in 1997. The author is Sonia Buist, with Emily Keller. Lots of things have changed around the mountain since the previous version of the book appeared, including the 2006 washout of the Eliot Creek crossing on the Timberline Trail. This book is written to tell users how to get the most out of the Timberline Trail,...

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Hiking enthusiasts flock to Mount Fuji as climbing season opens

Posted by on Jul 1, 2013 @ 6:35 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hikers flocked to Mount Fuji on Monday as Japan’s highest mountain, which last month was added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List, opened for the climbing season. At the 3,776-meter summit, climbers cheered as the sun broke through the clouds at around 4:40 a.m. Monday. They trekked up the mountain, which straddles Shizuoka and Yamanashi prefectures, after three of its four climbing routes opened at midnight Sunday. Another route, from Fujinomiya, Shizuoka Prefecture, will be completely opened by midnight next Sunday. The mountain’s registration...

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Canadian man hiking for 5 years has backpack stolen, burned

Posted by on Jul 1, 2013 @ 5:24 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

A Canadian man said he lost all his camping gear and footage for a documentary about his five-year hike when someone stole and burned his backpack. Dana Meise said he was hiking in Saskatchewan when he was invited by a family to see the chuck wagon races in Onion Lake. When he turned his back for a few minutes while preparing to sleep in one of the wagons, someone stole all his equipment and backpack, the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. reported. He found his backpack burned on the ground nearby. A hard drive containing hundreds of hours of...

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The 5 best U.S. places to raise outdoor kids

Posted by on Jul 1, 2013 @ 2:59 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Want to get your children hooked on the active life? In these five family-friendly towns, adventure is right outside the front door. New York City is a great place to raise a cultured, worldly kid, but when it comes to teaching them to appreciate nature, the Big Apple falls short in a big way. Though it’s geographically close to a number of quick, fantastic getaways—kayaking in the Hudson and East rivers, climbing at the Shawangunks, hiking at Bear Mountain—it doesn’t exactly make it easy to give kids the kind of consistent exposure to the...

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Chimney Rock Wins Favorite State Park, Best Hiking Trail in Best of the Mountains Southeast Travel Awards

Posted by on Jul 1, 2013 @ 7:07 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Chimney Rock Wins Favorite State Park, Best Hiking Trail in Best of the Mountains Southeast Travel Awards

Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park in North Carolina won the platinum award for Favorite State Park in Blue Ridge Country’s 2013 Best of the Mountains travel poll, covering seven southern states in the Appalachian Mountains. Readers awarded three more platinum honors for Best Hike to Take the Dog Along, Best Birding Area and Best Beautiful Fall Foliage Spot. Chimney Rock also received three golds for Best Hiking Trail (non-AT), Best Scenic Photo Opportunity and Best Waterfall. Chimney Rock, North Carolina, has been one of the...

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