News

Calumet Trail offers 9 miles of adventure

Posted by on Aug 1, 2013 @ 10:00 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Research shows walking benefits both the body and the mind, and the Northwest Indiana region is full of parks, trails and nature preserves that highlight the beauty and diverse landscape of the area. As one of the region’s longest single walkways, the Calumet Trail is the perfect place for walkers who enjoy trekking a variety of distances. It’s also one of the most hidden – though just a stone’s throw away from U.S. 12, the trail is hidden by vegetation on the north side of the highway. Depending on the time of the...

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Introducing Gear Up for Geocaching: More Treasure Than August Can Handle

Posted by on Aug 1, 2013 @ 12:05 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Introducing Gear Up for Geocaching: More Treasure Than August Can Handle

Calling all geocachers, both expert and new! Geocaching HQ is celebrating “31 Days of Geocaching” this August and awarding a new Geocaching digital souvenir for each day during the month that you find a geocache. To help geocachers get out and log their finds during the month of August, Geocaching is sponsoring a new promotion called Gear Up for Geocaching. Three lucky entrants drawn at random will get a prize package with cool stuff from some of your favorite outdoor brands. Each package will include treasure from brands such as Camp Chef,...

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Young hiker walking from North Dakota to New York on North Country Trail

Posted by on Jul 31, 2013 @ 8:20 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Young hiker walking from North Dakota to New York on North Country Trail

John D Rockefeller, the American industrialist once said: “I do not think that there is any other quality so essential to success of any kind as the quality of perseverance. It overcomes almost everything, even nature.” He might have been talking about 23-year-old Luke “Strider” Jordan, the good-natured Minnesota hiker now walking the entire 4,600 mile North Country National Scenic Trail. Jordan set out from North Dakota in March and endured six-weeks of unseasonably deep snow, hiking on snowshoes. There were days he woke and found his tent,...

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Hiking history: Kansas City man marches through Saratoga along historic Knox Trail

Posted by on Jul 31, 2013 @ 7:52 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A Kansas City man recently traveled to upstate New York to begin walking the historic Knox Trail that passes through Saratoga County. Dave Fagerberg hiked all the way from Ticonderoga to Mechanicville, following the route Col. Henry Knox used in winter 1775-76 to deliver cannon to Gen. George Washington in Boston, which forced the evacuation of British troops and ships there during the American Revolution. Fagerberg is planning a return trip East and will resume his march from Mechanicville to Boston. “The main purpose of walking historic...

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Britain’s National Parks: As nature intended

Posted by on Jul 30, 2013 @ 7:59 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Britain’s National Parks: As nature intended

Great Britain has 15 diverse national parks, from the New Forest’s pony-grazed heath and woodland to the high mountain plateau of the Cairngorms. They are spectacular landscapes, and according to a 2012 survey, nine out of 10 English people say national parks are important to them. The parks are also lived in and welcoming. And this is never more true than during National Parks Week (until 4 August; nationalparks.gov.uk), which encourages everyone to get the most out of Britain’s wild places. There are special events going on –...

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Teens aim to open hiking trails along Fort River to people with disabilities

Posted by on Jul 30, 2013 @ 7:28 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Thirteen teens chose to forgo a summer job with air conditioning, instead braving the heat and fighting off mosquitoes to assemble a universally accessible hiking trail along the Fort River in Massachussetts. “It’s really inspiring to see these kids give up a summer to do manual labor outdoors. That’s saying a lot for them,” said Heather Furman, 27, an AmeriCorps member who has worked alongside the 13 Youth Conservation Corps members constructing the trail. The pathway was envisioned years ago by Andrew French, the project leader who manages...

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New Zealander Hopes to Hike North and South Korea

Posted by on Jul 30, 2013 @ 3:30 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

New Zealander Hopes to Hike North and South Korea

Roger Shepherd, a former police officer from New Zealand, holds the unusual record of being the first foreigner to set foot in many of the remotest mountains of North Korea since at least the 1950-53 Korean War. Now, he is chasing a dream that looks even more daunting, something no one in living memory has attempted. He wants to walk the entire Baekdudaegan, the mountain range that runs 1,400 kilometers, or 870 miles, and forms the geological spine of the Korean Peninsula, starting from Baekdusan on the North Korean border with China, then...

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Trails to Turkish history and culture

Posted by on Jul 29, 2013 @ 7:10 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Turkey is dense with both history and natural beauty, and much of it remains undiscovered or under-appreciated. The task of bringing these treasures back to the world’s consciousness is often left to enthusiasts, writers, or individual tour operators who have found a love of this region and its people. However, tourism in the country is often concentrated around the cities, and efforts to preserve the unique wealth of historic, cultural, and natural beauty elsewhere are often challenged by the whims of a fast-developing economy where growth...

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With help from Boeing, the Palmetto Trail may finally be finished

Posted by on Jul 29, 2013 @ 3:11 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

With help from Boeing, the Palmetto Trail may finally be finished

Back in 1994, the Palmetto Conservation Foundation (PCF) decided the state of South Carolina needed a greenway. Connecting the sea to the mountains, it would be a sort of interstate highway for hikers and mountain bikers. In those days, South Carolina had a much different kind of state government. Then-governor Carroll Campbell allocated the first funding for what has now become the Palmetto Trail, and with the combined efforts of the U.S. Forest Service, state parks, and various corporate sponsors, the hope was to get the greenway finished...

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NC National Forest Swimming Discouraged Due to High Water Levels

Posted by on Jul 29, 2013 @ 2:59 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

FOREST SERVICE ALERT The U.S. Forest Service National Forests in North Carolina is urging visitors to the Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests to avoid swimming in the creeks, rivers and streams until water levels recede. Water levels are more than a foot above normal in some waterways. High water levels and strong currents pose a safety risk to visitors. Three swimming-related fatalities have occurred in the Pisgah National Forest this month. Visitors should also avoid climbing near waterfalls and be aware of the potential for flash...

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World Ranger Day Coming This Week

Posted by on Jul 28, 2013 @ 9:19 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

World Ranger Day Coming This Week

“World Ranger Day,” one day out of the year to show your appreciation for national park rangers the world over, arrives this week. The International Ranger Federation (IRF) was founded to support the work of rangers as the key protectors of the world’s protected areas. In 2006, at the World Ranger Congress in Scotland, IRF delegates decided that July 31 of each year, beginning in 2007, would be a day dedicated to world rangers. The first World Ranger Day fell on the 15th anniversary of the founding of IRF on July 31, 1992....

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Section of White River National Forest trail to close for repairs

Posted by on Jul 28, 2013 @ 9:10 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Part of a popular trail in the White Mountain National Forest will be closed next month for repairs to damage done during Tropical Storm Irene. The closure affects part of the Lincoln Woods Trail located off the Kancamagus Highway in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The U.S. Forest Service said it was able to stabilize the trail for short-term use, but a section of it requires extensive restoration. The work will start in early to mid-August and affect the west side of the suspension bridge to the Osseo Trail junction. It’s estimated six to eight...

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Jockey’s Ridge offers dune, hiking trails

Posted by on Jul 27, 2013 @ 11:58 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Going to the North Carolina Outer Banks? Take time for a climb to the top of Jockey’s Ridge, an 80- to 100-foot sand dune at Nags Head. Nature has provided a gigantic “sandbox” for children and adults to enjoy. Jockey’s Ridge, the tallest sand dune system in the eastern United States, was designated a National Natural Landmark in 1974. The following year, the N.C. General Assembly appropriated money to buy land, and, with matching federal funds, the state purchased 152 acres. The Nature Conservancy secured an additional 266 acres, and the...

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The Great Wall, Our Way

Posted by on Jul 27, 2013 @ 8:52 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

By JEANNIE RALSTON The Great Wall — 5,500 miles by some counts, longer by others — is not one wall, but many that were built starting in ancient times, and were consolidated and reinforced during the Ming dynasty (1368-1644). The purpose: keeping northern raiders from swooping down into the heart of China. The stretch of wall between Gubeikou and Jinshanling, which we hiked on the first day, is considered a prime example of Ming dynasty construction, built from 1568 through 1583 on top of a 1,000-year-old relic of a wall from the Northern Qi...

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Finger Lakes Land Trust to buy land to create Skaneateles Lake hiking trail

Posted by on Jul 26, 2013 @ 3:47 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Finger Lakes Land Trust to buy land to create Skaneateles Lake hiking trail

The Spafford, NY Town Board is discussing a Finger Lakes Land Trust plan to buy 205 acres from the Burns family on Route 41 to create hiking trails at the southern end of Skaneateles Lake. The Finger Lakes Land Trust has an agreement to buy the property from Bill and Leonard Burns. “It’s the linchpin property in our goal to create a greenbelt along the south of Skaneateles Lake,” said Andy Zepp, executive director of the land trust. “There’s a lot of it rugged woodland. It includes small meadows and agricultural...

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Southwest hiking destination gaining deadly reputation

Posted by on Jul 26, 2013 @ 3:37 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The luck of a draw had brought Anthony and Elisabeth Ann Bervel coveted hiking permits for The Wave, a region of richly colored sandstone patterns near the Utah-Arizona border. But just hours into their trek, 27-year-old Elisabeth Bervel died of cardiac arrest, becoming the third hiker in a month to succumb to the brutal summer heat and disorienting open country where no marked trail shows the way. The deaths have prompted officials to reassess the dangers for people who make the hike and perhaps seek an outside investigation of the risks,...

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Groups Envision a Shoreline Walk Between Bremerton and Gorst

Posted by on Jul 26, 2013 @ 6:59 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A proposed trail along the shoreline from Bremerton, WA to Gorst could create a new access for pedestrians and bicycle riders while restoring a degraded shoreline, according to experts who attended a weekend planning session in Bremerton. The two-mile-long paved trail could fit between the shoreline and railroad tracks most of the way between Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Gorst, according to Bryan Bowden of the National Park Service, who is leading the planning effort. Less than half a mile of the trail would cross the tracks and run next to...

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Blue Ridge Parkway crack is new attraction

Posted by on Jul 25, 2013 @ 7:36 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

It’s not the rippling mountain views. It’s not the chance to spot a black bear or a waterfall. The newest tourist attraction on the Blue Ridge Parkway north of Asheville, NC appears to be a giant crack in the asphalt. The crack, running down the center line of the roadway just north of the Tanbark Ridge Tunnel at milepost 374.5 and first noticed nearly two weeks ago, is now more than 300 feet long, more than 6 inches wide and several feet deep. The northbound side is a couple of inches lower than the southbound lane. A companion crack running...

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Bend woman completes 800-mile trek on Oregon Desert Trail

Posted by on Jul 25, 2013 @ 11:16 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Bend woman completes 800-mile trek on Oregon Desert Trail

Sage Clegg of Bend this month became the first person to traverse the entire Oregon Desert Trail – hiking and biking nearly 800 miles from Bend to Adrian near the Idaho border in 37 days. The trip was not without rough moments, the worst of which Clegg said happened two days before finishing the journey. “I started out in the morning and I was not a minute out of camp when I almost stepped on a huge rattlesnake,” said the 33-year-old wildlife biologist. Clegg walked just over 600 miles of the trail and biked about 200 miles....

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Long Trail footbridge will finally connect Duxbury and Bolton sections

Posted by on Jul 25, 2013 @ 9:04 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Long Trail footbridge will finally connect Duxbury and Bolton sections

The Winooski River’s 15-mile journey through the heart of the Green Mountains is spectacularly scenic. Dark, stony cliffs and sharp, evergreen-topped peaks rise abruptly from the river, which carves through the mountains from east to west. It’s also one of the prettiest sections on the Long Trail, the “footpath in the wilderness” that runs the length of Vermont, from Massachusetts to Quebec. Camel’s Hump, one of Vermont’s iconic mountains, can be seen immediately to the south, and the cliffs of Stimson Mountain loom over the river to the...

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Plan would eventually link Chambersburg Rail Trail, Appalachian Trail

Posted by on Jul 25, 2013 @ 8:52 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Talks are under way for the first phase of an 18-mile trail connecting the Chambersburg Rail Trail at Wilson College to the Appalachian Trail in Caledonia State Park, Pennsylvania. The six-mile section of the Conococheague Trailway would cross the campus of the former Scotland School for Veterans’ Children and the Chambersburg Country Club. The first phase of the project would connect Norlo Park at Fayetteville in Guilford Township to the Greene Township Municipal Park. The proposed route follows a railroad right of way abandoned in...

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Senate Committee Taking Testimony July 25 On Funding The National Park Service

Posted by on Jul 24, 2013 @ 4:22 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

A hearing July 25th before the full Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will delve into the fiscal needs of the National Park Service for the next fiscal year. Specifically, the senators want to hear about “supplemental” funding mechanisms that could help the Park Service afford the National Park System. A range of supplemental funding sources was identified earlier this year by the National Parks Hospitality Association and the National Parks Conservation Association. Some of those proposals, if enacted, would mean...

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San Ramon Valley Map Book Features 3-D Mt. Diablo Hiking Trails

Posted by on Jul 24, 2013 @ 4:11 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

San Ramon Valley Map Book Features 3-D Mt. Diablo Hiking Trails

More than 25,000 map books that cover streets, buildings and trails in the San Ramon Valley region will be available for residents or visitors in late July and August. The magazine-style maps, which cover Danville, Alamo, Blackhawk, San Ramon, Diablo and Rossmoor and downtown Walnut Creek displays 3-D elevations and hiking trails in Mt. Diablo State Park, Las Trampas Regional Wilderness and other recreational areas. In a recent release, the map creators don’t deny that many residents are probably wondering why bother with a map when...

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Quebec’s hiking trails ‘a great secret’ unknown to anglophones, says new guide

Posted by on Jul 23, 2013 @ 5:27 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Michael Haynes, author of the new book “Hiking Trails of Montreal and Beyond,” says many of Quebec’s excellent walking routes are “a great secret,” largely unknown to anglophones. Most websites on trails in the province, as well as printed material and access information, are in French only, he says in his preface. The book profiles 50 walking trails within 150 kilometres of Montreal, covering city parks, wilderness treks and mountain summits. “Because of the proximity of the rugged Laurentian Mountains to...

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TEENS on TRAIL – Hike Safe Contest

Posted by on Jul 23, 2013 @ 8:50 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hiking is fun, but inexperienced hikers, especially teens, are most at risk for injury, even death. Teens can enter a digital media contest to help raise awareness about hiking safety and win a backpack filled with the hiking “Ten Essentials.” Youth enter by submitting a link to an entry by Sept. 30 at Washington Trails Association. The entry can be a photo, video, sound clip or animation about teens and hiking safety. Safe Kids Snohomish County along with the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest Service and Washington Trails Association are...

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Wind farm lets you bike, hike or hunt among towering turbines

Posted by on Jul 22, 2013 @ 3:06 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

From Interstate 90, the wind turbines seem like toothpicks. But up close they are massive, and there may be no better place to learn about them than the Wild Horse Wind Farm, Puget Sound Energy’s power plantation 18 miles northeast of Ellensburg, WA. Its privately owned 11,000 acres of scrubby brush and ravines are accessible to the public for hiking or biking, even hunting; just complete the paperwork. What distinguishes this stretch of rangeland, however, is the opportunity to check out the 149 turbines. There’s a tour that will...

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Lake Superior’s North Shore, Isle Royale hard to beat for hikers

Posted by on Jul 21, 2013 @ 8:37 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Lake Superior contains more water than all the other Great Lakes combined, and all that water has to come from somewhere. More than 300 rivers and streams empty into the lake, including many in the stretch of Minnesota between Duluth and Grand Portage along the North Shore. The Cascade River drops 900 feet in its last three miles, and even at low water levels prevailing, it is obvious how the river gets its name. Every 10 steps, there is another view of a zigzag corridor of waterfalls. For ambitious hikers, there is a steep 7.8-mile loop. A...

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Woodsy escapes for your summer vacation

Posted by on Jul 21, 2013 @ 9:33 am in Hiking News | 5 comments

Looking at most summer travel editorials, you’d think everyone on Earth wants the same thing from a warm-weather getaway; beach, beach and more beach. But even if you love your time on the sand, some of us also enjoy spending time in the quiet, shady forests — it’s when the area is most “alive” and a more comfortable time to hike. Basecamp in Lake Tahoe is a very green, very cool, and affordable accommodation in the popular outdoor-fun region of California. While many people from outside the area think of Lake Tahoe as...

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Take care when hiking in the heat

Posted by on Jul 20, 2013 @ 7:22 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Staying hydrated is a critical way to avoid heat-related problems during summer hikes. The human body is limited in the amount of fluid it can absorb, even when it is losing a high volume of sweat. Typically, a person can process about a quart, or 32 ounces, of fluid an hour. While that might not replace all of the fluid lost through sweat, it’s typically enough. Drinking water alone isn’t enough to account for heavy sweating, because that sweat includes important electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium. In fact, drinking too...

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Trekking the Ridgeway: Britain’s oldest road

Posted by on Jul 20, 2013 @ 1:44 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

By Ben Lerwill, for CNN The stone in front of me, twice my height, has been standing here in Avebury, England, for more than 4,500 years. The rough, pitted rock forms part of a huge Neolithic stone circle within which a pub, a post office and several cottages now stand. Avebury is one of the world’s great pagan heritage sites – and one of the most mysterious. Exactly how, and why, its stones (originally numbering almost 100 and some weighing more than 50 tons) were erected is still debated. The stones mark the start of the...

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A mountain jewel: Tennessee’s newest state park to be located in the middle of Rocky Fork

Posted by on Jul 19, 2013 @ 4:00 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

A mountain jewel: Tennessee’s newest state park to be located in the middle of Rocky Fork

On July 1, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation officially acquired 2,036 acres in the middle of the Rocky Fork tract located in the mountains of upper East Tennessee. Surrounding the state park’s future site is 7,600 acres that have been added to the Cherokee National Forest thanks to $30 million in funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund. At almost 10,000 acres, the entire Rocky Fork tract is a microcosm of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park — a haven for native trout, salamanders and peregrine falcons, and...

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How the UK’s national parks can cut traffic and reach their full potential

Posted by on Jul 19, 2013 @ 3:09 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The UK’s 15 national parks – 10 in England, two in Scotland and three in Wales – will cost the public purse about £65m a year in 2013. They represent some the best value in public spending at the moment – but the parks are not doing enough to justify the special powers that they have. While it is unreasonable to expect a national park authority to solve every problem that rural living in the 21st century produces, they could do a lot more. They could carve out a very distinctive contribution and set the agenda. They could be a source of...

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Native Peoples Honored with Trail in Oregon National Forest

Posted by on Jul 19, 2013 @ 3:01 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Alsea were a tribe of Native Americans who, for thousands of years, lived along the central Oregon Coast. In 1901 anthropologist Livingston Farrand predicted their loss in “Notes on the Alsea Indians of Oregon.” The City of Yachats, a small coastal city in Oregon, has joined with the U.S. Forest Service and Oregon State Parks to dedicate the new Ya’Xaik (pronounced yäh’ khīk) Trail. The trail is named for the only known village of the Alsea people who originally inhabited the area. This trail is the result of many years of collaborative...

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125 years of hut-to-hut hiking in New Hampshire’s White Mountains

Posted by on Jul 19, 2013 @ 7:27 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

125 years of hut-to-hut hiking in New Hampshire’s White Mountains

Seems quite simple, really: one foot in front of the other. But when you’re faced with adversity such as flooded trails, heavy humidity, biting black flies, the threat of thunderstorms, and ascents and descents on rock-laden trails that at times feel like a Marine Corps obstacle course, nothing is easy. Then you arrive at the next hut, each a day’s hike apart, looking at this exquisite view, and all is good. You’ve accepted the challenge and this is your just desert, one of the many reasons the huts continue to thrive 125 years after they...

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