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Finding Minnesota: Superior Hiking Trail

Posted by on Sep 1, 2014 @ 12:41 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Finding Minnesota: Superior Hiking Trail

Before you know it, the trees in Minnesota will be turning bright shades of yellow, orange and red. Some of the most spectacular views in the state can be found along the Superior Hiking Trail in the Arrowhead region. “It’s a whole different world out here,” said Dan Carr of Two Harbors, who hikes the trail regularly. “You just have to get off Highway 61.” The Superior Hiking Trail follows the ridge line of Lake Superior’s north shore, through eight state parks along with inland forests and lakes. There are two distinct bursts of fall color...

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Hikes you must do in Marin County, CA

Posted by on Sep 1, 2014 @ 12:31 pm in Hiking News | 2 comments

While you can’t go wrong with when it comes to hiking in Marin County, California, there are some areas you undoubtedly must visit at least once. Considering Marin’s seemingly endless selection of open space and trails, creating a list of the best hikes the county has to offer is no easy feat. But here’s a shot, with a mix of cardio-pumping routes and easy flat trails that are kid friendly. These hikes range from more intense all-day treks to little half-day loops. They also encompass a range of scenery, including...

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Hike into hell: Testing your limits in the mountains

Posted by on Aug 31, 2014 @ 9:26 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hike into hell: Testing your limits in the mountains

The past winter was so brutal that only the thought of a week-long hike through hell could keep Scott Gauvin warm. Gauvin, 37, of Springfield, IL, is one of 14 outdoor bloggers from all over the country to undertake the six-day Hell Hike and Raft — named for the trip through the Seven Devils mountain range and the Snake River running through Hell’s Canyon in Idaho. It begins Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. Planning began during one of the bleakest winters in recent memory. “This is what we were discussing last winter when it was too cold to do...

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Olympic National Park is a gem, rain or shine

Posted by on Aug 31, 2014 @ 8:12 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The far side of the Olympic National Park, on the west coast of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, is indeed rain forest. Its Hoh River Valley is drenched with a dozen feet of rain a year. Think 50 shades of green in a wondrous tangle of trees, moss, ferns. Yet Olympic National Park is so vast – almost 1 million acres of mountains, forest and ocean beaches – that you can find drier sides and your own natural haven, rain or shine. At Hurricane Ridge, in the park’s northeast corner, drive up the winding road to the 5,242-foot viewpoint on a...

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Crooked River Ranch trails of central Oregon become more fun to hike as summer’s heat wanes

Posted by on Aug 30, 2014 @ 11:18 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The heat is slowly on its way out, so the time is on hand to experience the many trails that leave from the edge of the Crooked River Ranch in Central Oregon. Actually, summer was a good time to go, too, because the trails lead to the cool waters of the Deschutes and Crooked rivers. Hiking early or late in the day helps beat the heat. The Crooked River Ranch is a recreation/housing development, in southern Jefferson County (with a small part of northern Deschutes County) in central Oregon. Public facilities on the ranch include an 18-hole...

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A 500-mile solo hike to cure loneliness

Posted by on Aug 30, 2014 @ 8:35 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A 500-mile solo hike to cure loneliness

The plan was to hike the Colorado Trail, a 500-mile path through the Rockies that links Denver with Durango. It crosses eight mountain ranges, travels through remote wilderness areas, and climbs nearly three times the height of Mt. Everest. Most of the trail is above 10,000 ft., so the air is thin, the danger of lightning strikes is severe, and nighttime temperatures often dip below freezing. Of the estimated 400 people who attempt the trail a given year, only about 150 finish. A friend said, “I think you’re nuts. Traveling alone in the...

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Grand Canyon to limit rim-to-rim hiking-group size

Posted by on Aug 29, 2014 @ 12:02 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Grand Canyon National Park is trying to fight overcrowding and the accumulation of clothing, food and even human waste along trails by requiring permits for organized groups and limiting them to 30 people. Starting Sept. 15, 2014, any group taking organized, rim-to-rim or extended day-hiking and running trips in the inner Canyon will have to pay $175 for a permit. Super-crowded trails are a problem only about three weekends every spring and three every fall, but the frustrations, impact and behaviors can be “extreme” said Peter...

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Girl Scouts save boys hiking Pikes Peak

Posted by on Aug 29, 2014 @ 11:57 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Three teenagers said the survival skills they learned during Girl Scouts saved two high school boys trying to hike Pikes Peak. Rebecca Clark, Jordan Wilson and Tristina Altman set out on Pikes Peak last weekend. They thought their toughest challenge would be summitting Pikes Peak. “We packed sleeping bags, tents, fire building stuff, water, toilet paper, necessities,” said Altman. However, on the way down they came across two high school boys who were ill-prepared for the trip. “One of them had altitude sickness so he was...

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You Should Spend Money on Experiences, Not Things

Posted by on Aug 28, 2014 @ 7:30 pm in Hiking News | 1 comment

It’s been over a decade since American psychologists Leaf Van Boven and Thomas Gilovich concluded that doing things makes people happier than having things. “To Do or to Have? That Is the Question” was the title of the study they published in 2003, and it’s been cited hundreds of times since. Many people now recognize that spending money on, say, a plane ticket for a vacation is more satisfying in the long run than purchasing a new television for the same price. But happiness studies keep evolving, and social scientists continue to find new...

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Hickory Nut Gorge celebrates waterfall access, trailhead into park

Posted by on Aug 28, 2014 @ 1:28 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hickory Nut Gorge celebrates waterfall access, trailhead into park

An impromptu appearance of a dozen hikers was affirmation for the 50 people sitting at a ceremony on folding chairs that Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy had succeeded in their goal of expanding access to the Hickory Nut Gorge’s growing trail network. The ceremony along Highway 74-A was hosted by CMLC and Henderson County Parks and Recreation to celebrate several milestones: the development of a trailhead at the foot of the Florence Nature Preserve, which is now a county park, and the grand opening of 1.1 miles of trail up to Little...

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The Cradle of Forestry Hosts Afternoon Tea with Llamas

Posted by on Aug 28, 2014 @ 12:26 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Cradle of Forestry in America will offer “Afternoon Tea with Llamas” on Saturday, Sept. 13 at 11 a.m. and again at 2 p.m. The llamas will carry your lunches or snacks on this easy walk along the Forest Discovery Trail at the Cradle of Forestry. Organizers will provide ice tea and cups. As the group walks the Forest Discovery Trail, children can take turns leading the llamas. The group will stop and picnic along the trail. This moderate, two-mile walk travels through scenic woods and by the 1914 Climax logging locomotive....

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Hiking Kanarra Creek Trail is a family affair

Posted by on Aug 27, 2014 @ 9:52 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

If you want to experience a beautiful slot canyon with the family, Kanarra Creek, Utah is slow-moving and not too difficult to access. Hikers of Kanarra Falls Trail can expect to encounter multiple waterfalls, including two that are 8 feet or taller, and breathtaking sandstone colors throughout the slot canyon. While it’s not something for small children or those new to hiking, the trail is appropriate for kids with some hiking experience. Hikers should know how to navigate tripping hazards like tree roots and narrow trails, be comfortable...

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Trace Ridge Trails and Roads Reopened in Pisgah

Posted by on Aug 25, 2014 @ 11:32 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The U.S. Forest Service has reopened all trails and roads in the Trace Ridge and Wash Creek Area after completing an ecosystem improvement project in the Pisgah Ranger District, Pisgah National Forest. All roads and trails have been reopened to their designated use, including Wash Creek Road, which restores motorized access to the Trace Ridge Trailhead. The roads and trails were closed during the project to help ensure public safety during timber harvesting activities. The evidence of implementing this project will be obvious as timber...

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Retracing the Mullan Road: A once-vital route across the Continental Divide

Posted by on Aug 25, 2014 @ 8:14 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Wagon wheel ruts remain in sun-baked soil atop the mountain pass named for the man who left his mark there. John Mullan was an Army first lieutenant in the 1850s and tasked with building a road that would connect two outposts and help speed the travel of troops, travelers and commercial freight across the Continental Divide. He was to construct a road across plains and mountains to link forts Benton and Walla Walla. Fort Benton, which preceded the town that’s located there now and was a trading post at that time, was the farthest steamboats...

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A walk on the woolly side: sheep trekking in Wales

Posted by on Aug 25, 2014 @ 8:08 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

It’s the tour for those who like to follow. Visitors to Wales can now enjoy sheep trekking; roaming the Brecon Beacons national park in the company of wooly farmyard friends. The concept – which is new to the region – is being offered by Good Day Out along with Aberhyddnant Farm, who have trained a flock of Jacob sheep for the purpose. Visitors can select their own sheep, which will then accompany them (with the help of a rope halter), on a two-and-a-half-hour trek towards the Black Mountains with views towards Pen y Fan. Although the sheep...

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Taking a trip of exotic hiking in Iceland

Posted by on Aug 24, 2014 @ 2:44 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

You have to walk quite a few miles, climb your share of hills and wear out an army’s stock of shoe leather before getting to the point of considering backpacking in Iceland. Sixty-one-year-old Jim Foster, who refers to himself as a reformed attorney, has walked Patagonia, climbed Kilimanjaro, trekked New Zealand, backpacked the American west, and in 2007, hiked the entire length of the Appalachian Trail. Consider him qualified to stand, and walk, on his own two feet anywhere he wants. Foster and his friend, Paul Shaw, are just back from nine...

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Wildfire shuts down 25 miles of Pacific Crest Trail

Posted by on Aug 23, 2014 @ 8:03 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Wildfire shuts down 25 miles of Pacific Crest Trail

A large swath of the Pacific Crest Trail in the Southern Cascades will be shut down beginning August 23, due to the growing activity of the 790 Fire. The closure covers roughly 25 miles from Oregon Highway 140 north to the boundary of Crater Lake National Park, the U.S. Forest Service said. The closure includes most trails in the popular Seven Lakes Basin of the Sky Lakes Wilderness, where the fire is located, near Hemlock Lake. The fire has recently crossed the trail and there are numerous down and burning snags making the trail unsafe. Fire...

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Parking Meters at Hiking Trailheads?

Posted by on Aug 22, 2014 @ 11:12 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Phoenix Parks Board meets next week to discuss a proposal to install parking meters in the parking areas of the city’s most popular hiking trailheads. The idea of “fee-based parking” was approved by the Parks Board in 2010 but never implemented. Now, with a looming city budget deficit, the idea is being revived to bring in extra revenue. Deputy Parks Director Ken Vonderscher says the proposal would be for meters at only three trailhead parking lots: Echo Canyon at Camelback Mountain, Piestewa Peak, and Pima Canyon at...

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Hiking guide explores the trail less traveled

Posted by on Aug 21, 2014 @ 1:49 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

For adventurous hikers looking to traverse the paths less traveled, author Justin Rohde said his new book provides a detailed guide to the region that straddles the Oregon and California border, which contains the highest concentration of undammed wild and scenic rivers in the United States. Rohde, who worked as a guide on hiking trails near Cave Junction in Oregon’s Illinois Valley in 2007, said putting together the 126-page “Hiking Oregon and California’s Wild Rivers Country” was its own long, difficult haul....

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Changes at Streamside in the Southern Appalachians

Posted by on Aug 21, 2014 @ 6:31 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The loss of eastern hemlock could affect water yield and storm flow from forest watersheds in the southern Appalachians, according to a new study by U.S. Forest Service scientists at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory (Coweeta) located in Otto, North Carolina. The article was recently published online in the journal Ecohydrology. “Eastern hemlock trees have died throughout much of their range due to the hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic invasive insect,” said Steven Brantley, a post-doctoral researcher at Coweeta and lead author of the paper....

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NPS Implements Interim Policy Prohibiting Unmanned Aircraft on Appalachian National Scenic Trail

Posted by on Aug 20, 2014 @ 11:55 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

NPS Implements Interim Policy Prohibiting Unmanned Aircraft on Appalachian National Scenic Trail

The National Park Service has developed an interim policy prohibiting the use of unmanned aircraft, also known as drones, on NPS managed lands of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail. This is a new park use that could affect park resources, staff, and visitors in ways that the National Park Service has yet to identify, analyze and examine. It is the National Park Service policy to not allow a new park use until a determination has been made that it will not result in unacceptable impacts on park resources and values, plus staff and visitor...

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How a Health Guru Helped L.A. Discover its Hiking Trails

Posted by on Aug 20, 2014 @ 9:19 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Long before yoga pants made their first appearance in Runyon Canyon, a health guru helped Angelenos discover their local mountain trails. Beginning in 1924, on the first and third Sunday of each month, members of the Wanderlusters Hiking Club followed Paul C. Bragg into the hilly terrain around Los Angeles. Dozens of them traipsed through Altadena’s Millard Canyon or hiked up Griffith Park’s Mount Hollywood. Men doffed their shirts. Women wore bathing suits. Sunscreen had yet to be invented. Hiking was nothing new in the...

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Renville County, MN looks to develop more hiking trails

Posted by on Aug 20, 2014 @ 9:12 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Provided you know how to find your way, there are miles of prairie and woodland trails offering scenic overlooks, opportunities to view wildlife, and areas to enjoy a picnic lunch alongside flowing water. It’s all to be found in the seven Renville County, Minnesota parks, where it soon could be a lot easier to find your way. Mark Erickson, community and environment director for Renville County, said the county park board and a specially appointed trails committee have developed a draft plan for developing a marked trail system in each of the...

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Restoring Acadia’s Historic Hiking Trails

Posted by on Aug 20, 2014 @ 9:06 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hiking Acadia is a pastime almost as old as the state of Maine itself. “People have been hiking Mt. Desert Island and these moutains since the mid-1800s,” said Gary Stellpflug, Trails Foreman at Acadia National Park. Between the 1890s and the 1930s some 130 miles of trails were cut in this park. But then… “Finances for the trails program dwindled over the course of the next couple years, right into the 1960s and 1970s,” said Stellpflug. Many trails were abandoned or fell into disrepair-that is until 1999 when a massive restoration effort...

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Gunsight Pass: Cross Continental Divide on Glacier trail

Posted by on Aug 19, 2014 @ 5:23 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

If you want to cross the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park and are looking for more adventure than walking past the sign atop Going-to-the-Sun Road, take the trail over Gunsight Pass instead. The 20-mile trail connects Jackson Glacier Overlook on the east with Lake McDonald Lodge on the west, and can be done as a long day hike or as a backpacking trip. Along the way, you’ll see plenty of waterfalls, at least a couple of glaciers, possibly moose and more than likely mountain goats. One of the easiest ways to hike the full length of...

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Ken Burns shares secrets of Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Posted by on Aug 19, 2014 @ 5:11 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

“There is a great human story” of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, according to Ken Burns, the Emmy award-winning filmmaker. As co-creator of the PBS series America’s Best Idea: The National Parks, Burns and his team spent over six years filming in national parks across the United States. Burns sat down with USA TODAY and shared the secrets of Great Smoky Mountains and nine other national parks for a special 10-part series, Secrets of the National Parks. While the U.S. national parks celebrate nature at its best, Burns...

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Prescott, AZ 7th annual hiking spree starts Sept. 6 at Highlands Center

Posted by on Aug 19, 2014 @ 6:41 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Prescott, AZ 7th annual hiking spree starts Sept. 6 at Highlands Center

This year’s Hiking Spree enthusiasts will start their morning at the Highlands Center at 9:00 AM, September 6th with a free presentation by Sam Frank, Central Arizona Director for the Arizona Wilderness Coalition (AWC), in recognition of the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act. “This presentation will include inspiring photos, history of the AWC, take-home maps, and a Q&A session. As it is the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, the Hiking Spree will have a special focus on wilderness trails, with six wilderness trails (two new...

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Trekking in Yunnan China, where dragons stand guard

Posted by on Aug 18, 2014 @ 8:18 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

For sheer dramatic natural beauty, Tiger Leaping Gorge in China’s Yunnan province takes some beating. Situated around 60km west of the historic city of Lijiang, the 15km-long gorge carves its way through steep-sided and snow-capped Himalayan peaks that line up like a rugged roll-call of nature’s tough guys. Most people walk part or all of the one-day Low Way, a 21km flat and paved path through the bottom of the gorge. However, the 22km High Path – a more physically demanding two-day trek through remote Naxi hill farming terraces – is the...

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Itinerate hiker: Retired surgeon explores, volunteers on CDT

Posted by on Aug 17, 2014 @ 10:54 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Itinerate hiker: Retired surgeon explores, volunteers on CDT

Eric White has hiked 8,500 miles. And his favorite mileage has been along the Continental Divide Trail. It’s what brings him to Butte, Montana every summer to volunteer on crews improving the trail. White, a retired orthopedic surgeon who lives in Williamstown, Mass., spends part of his summers in Butte volunteering with AmeriCorps to improve the trail. He first became acquainted with Butte in 2008 when he became lost on the infamously poorly marked CDT. He bumped into Jocelyn Dodge, recreation forester with the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National...

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Take a Hike Across Ethiopia’s Simien Mountains

Posted by on Aug 16, 2014 @ 8:57 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hauling yourself up a stony path, the air thins with every breath. Ribbons of mist weave past and a vulture circles overhead. Just when you think your legs can’t take it anymore, you reach the top. Your guide warns you not to step any closer to the edge. It is the most terrifying sensation—and one of the most rewarding. All around similar hills rise like turrets in the valley below, with sheer drops for sides, and it is hard to take in the scale. With these majestic cathedrals of rock—and not another soul as far as the eye can...

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A short drive from Seattle, the hiking is spectacular

Posted by on Aug 16, 2014 @ 8:41 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

This summer’s devastating wildfires in eastern Washington have cast a smoky pall over some of the state’s premier hiking destinations, but those trails have been largely untouched by flames. So “best days” can be had in abundance throughout the Cascade Mountains, on trails within easy driving distance of the city. And you don’t have to scramble up steep rock to experience them. It’s hard to say what’s best about a trip up to Ingalls in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness — that glorious moment when you pop...

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