Earthjustice Wins 16-Year-Long Battle to Protect 50 Million Acres of Forests

  A decades-long fight over a landmark rule protecting wild forests nationwide took another successful–and possibly final–turn after a U.S. district court threw out a last-ditch attack by the state of Alaska against the Roadless Rule. Adopted in the closing days of the Clinton administration, the Roadless Rule prohibits most logging and road construction in...

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130 Miles, 8 Days, 1 Spellbound Hiker/Photographer on Kodiak Island

Kodiak Island, the second largest in the United States, is best known for the main quarry of this trip, the oversized subspecies of brown bear, the Kodiak bear, that is unique to its mountains and shorelines. This journey goes 130 miles along the notoriously rough shoreline of Shelikof Strait, across river drainages and bays, paddling packrafts through a series of lakes...

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A Bear’s-Eye view of the Katmai Coast

Ever wonder what the world looks like through the eyes of a brown bear? Researchers at Katmai National Park wonder, too. To learn more, they initiated a collaborative, multi-year study examining the relationship between intertidal resources, coastal brown bear behavior, and human influences. As a part of this study, nine brown bears along the Katmai coast were outfitted...

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Exploring Lake Clark National Park in Alaska

Lake Clark is one of the National Park System’s true gems—a large sliver of all of the best parts of Alaska rolled into one easy-to-get-to place. It is almost as if Mother Nature created it with explorers in mind, offering diverse environments for mountaineers, backpackers, paddlers, big-game fisherman, hikers, and photographers to play in. The lake that bares the park’s...

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Parts of the Valdez-Eagle Trail can still be walked

In the wake of the Klondike Gold Rush, U.S. Army Captain P.H. Ray was sent to Alaska in 1897 to investigate rumors of unrest among gold seekers along the U.S. portion of the Yukon River. During his travels, Ray heard from prospectors clamoring for an “All-American” route to the Yukon gold fields that would bypass the Canadian-controlled White Pass and Chilkoot Trails....

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Trail to the past: Recreating a 1968 hike

Last year, a former Eielson airman asked for help identifying the location of an Interior hill he climbed in 1968. Fairbanks history buffs and hiking enthusiasts rushed to help him. First, they identified the location of his hike from his old photographs.Then, last month, they took him hiking there when he flew in from Kentucky to re-create the hike. Bob Pettit’s main...

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Legal challenges over Exxon Valdez sputter to an end

When the sun set just after 8 pm on March 23, 1989, nothing was amiss in Alaska’s Prince William Sound. The ocean lapped at rocky, seaweed-strewn beaches, boats dotted the horizon, and thousands of sea otters floated serenely on their backs. But all that changed the following morning, when the Exxon Valdez tanker ran aground and hemorrhaged 11 million gallons of crude...

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Shell’s giving up drilling in the Arctic Ocean. Now what?

On Sept. 28, 2015, Shell captured national attention when it announced that the exploratory well it drilled in hopes of extracting the first barrels of oil from Alaska’s Chukchi Sea was a bust. The company didn’t strike enough oil to make further exploration economically viable. Effective immediately, it’s backing out of the Arctic Ocean “for the foreseeable future.”...

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Alaska Entering New Era for Wildfires

Alaska, the great northern frontier of America, is being reshaped by climate change. While rising temperatures are altering its character and landscape, they are also bringing the ravages of wildfires. In the past 60 years, Alaska has warmed more than twice as fast as the rest of the country, with average temperatures up by nearly 3°F. By 2050, temperatures are projected...

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Majestic glaciers in Alaska: Then and now

If you’re looking at something but don’t have anything to compare it to, it’s hard to know what’s really going on. Maybe you meet someone for the first time and think they look a little sick, so you think they’re not doing too well. But if you had met them a year ago when they were terminally ill, you’d think that today’s health was a...

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Hiking to Granite Basin, Alaska

There are two principal ways to get to Granite Basin, and on a wonderfully warm and sunny day in early August, the Parks and Recreation Hiking Group used both of them. Nine strong hikers aimed for Mount Juneau and the Juneau Ridge; they spent 10 hours on the loop from the top of the mountain, along the ridge and down through Granite Basin. They reported seeing goats and...

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Denali National Park: The Complete Visitors Guide

Winter is the time for dreaming, and planning the following summer’s vacation, which makes Bill Sherwonit’s book on Denali National Park a good resource to turn to. True, many of us might never make it to Alaska to visit Denali. But Denali National Park: The Complete Visitors Guide To The Mountain, Wildlife, And Year-Round Outdoor Activities entices us not...

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Massive Landslide Closes Denali Park Road

A massive landslide has closed the Denali Park Road at Mile 37 in Denali National Park, covering the road with an estimated 30,000 yards of material that will take crews days if not weeks to remove. The slide is west of Tattler Creek, on the section of road going up to Sable Pass. The slide, which covers approximately 200 feet of the road in depths of up to 35 feet, was...

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Chugach Children’s Forest – Get Out. Go Wild. Change the Future.

The Chugach Children’s Forest is a partnership led by Alaska Geographic and the USDA Forest Service. A symbolic designation for the entire Chugach National Forest, the Chugach Children’s Forest creates exciting opportunities for Alaska’s youth and communities to connect with the magnificent Chugach National Forest and neighboring public lands. The Chugach National Forest...

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Denali National Park’s History Rooted in Preservation

Mention Denali National Park and the first image people may envision is the 20,320-foot mountain the park surrounds. While Denali, North America’s highest peak, may be the cornerstone of the park today, it’s not the reason the land was set aside nearly a century ago by congress. In fact, it was something much smaller that provided the reason for the land...

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Hikers rescued trying to reach ‘Into the Wild’ bus

A second set of hikers this summer have had to be rescued after trying to reach a famed abandoned Fairbanks city bus in the Alaska wilderness, after the book and movie “Into the Wild” made the remote bus famous. A group of three hikers had to be lifted out of the wilderness on June 25, the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported. A helicopter delivered the three...

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You’re Invited To Help Denali National Park Staff Maintain Trails

Want to know what it takes to provide trails for visitors in Denali National Park? Come join the Denali trail crew on Saturday, June 1, and celebrate National Trails Day by helping with annual maintenance activities on the Mount Healy Overlook Trail. Volunteers will help the National Park Service trail crew with hauling brush, repairing drainage ditches, and other trail...

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