Resistance

Resistance

Where Meanderthals keeps track of anti-conservation, anti-environment tactics

 

The first update to the new Trump White House website rolls back Clean Air and Water

January 20, 2017 For too long, we’ve been held back by burdensome regulations on our energy industry. President Trump is committed to eliminating harmful and unnecessary policies such as the Climate Action Plan and the Waters of the U.S. rule. The Trump Administration will embrace the shale oil and gas revolution… We must take advantage of the estimated $50 trillion in untapped shale, oil, and natural gas reserves, especially those on federal lands that the American people own. The Trump Administration is also committed to clean coal technology, and to reviving America’s coal industry. [cite]

 

GOP targets landmark Endangered Species Act for big changes

January 17, 2017 In control of Congress and soon the White House, Republicans are readying plans to roll back the influence of the Endangered Species Act, one of the government’s most powerful conservation tools, after decades of complaints that it hinders drilling, logging and other activities. Over the past eight years, GOP lawmakers sponsored dozens of measures aimed at curtailing the landmark law or putting species such as gray wolves and sage grouse out of its reach. Almost all were blocked by Democrats and the White House or lawsuits from environmentalists. [cite]

 

Download the Free Guide

 

The House just made it a lot easier to sell off national parks

January 4, 2017 The House now officially values public lands at $0. A new rule, written by House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT), establishes as fact that any legislation to dispose of public lands and natural resources would cost taxpayers exactly $0. This paves the way for the new Congress to get rid of vast swaths of public lands — all at the expense of the American taxpayer. [cite]

 

Congress takes quick shot at transferring federal public lands to local interests

January 3, 2017 The 115th Congress got off to an eye-opening start on their very first day, voting in favor of facilitating transfers of some federal public lands and waters to state, local and private interests. The provision would designate any transfer legislation “budget neutral,” eliminating existing safeguards against undervaluing public lands, disregarding any revenue or economic benefits currently generated and paving the way for quick and discreet giveaways of valuable lands and waters – including national forests, wildlife refuges and BLM lands – historically owned by the American people. [cite]