News

Hiking in South Korea: trails and tribulations on the Baekdu Daegan

Posted by on Oct 25, 2013 @ 6:52 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Daniel Adamson, The Guardian The climb from the monastery had taken two days, a steady, breath-by-breath progression up through the woods under full packs. Suddenly, the path broke from the trees and we were on the exposed granite summit of mainland South Korea’s highest peak, Cheonwangbong. To the north we could see the crooked spine of the Baekdu Daegan, a mountain ridge and watershed that runs the length of the peninsula. I was there with my partner, Somi, who was brought up in downtown Seoul and had pushed hard for a couple of weeks...

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Massive Landslide Closes Denali Park Road

Posted by on Oct 25, 2013 @ 2:49 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

A massive landslide has closed the Denali Park Road at Mile 37 in Denali National Park, covering the road with an estimated 30,000 yards of material that will take crews days if not weeks to remove. The slide is west of Tattler Creek, on the section of road going up to Sable Pass. The slide, which covers approximately 200 feet of the road in depths of up to 35 feet, was released from a point 500 feet above the road and flowed south below the road, a park release said. The slide did not reach Igloo Creek. Park staff, including the park...

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Los Padres National Forest Launches Visitor Survey

Posted by on Oct 25, 2013 @ 7:06 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Los Padres National Forest officials today announced the beginning of a one-year National Visitor Use Monitoring (NVUM) survey across the Forest. This survey, done in partnership with the University of California at San Marcos, will conduct interviews at pre-selected points throughout the Forest through September 2014. The Cleveland and San Bernardino National Forests are undertaking similar visitor use surveys during this same timeframe. The NVUM survey is a statistical visitor sampling system developed for all Federal land management...

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Hiking Through Peru Showed One Journalist The True Dangers Of Climate Change

Posted by on Oct 24, 2013 @ 11:26 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Rising sea levels and more extreme temperatures aren’t the only problems we can anticipate as the Earth warms. Climate change is causing local extinctions of plants and animals — and in places like the Amazon basin, these plants are moving to higher or lower ground in response to changing environments. Justin Catanoso, grantee of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, spent July 25 to Aug. 11 in Peru with Wake Forest University tropical biologist Miles Silman. He hiked through Manu National Park with the researchers to experience the...

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Maine outdoorsman launches debut book on long-distance hiking

Posted by on Oct 24, 2013 @ 3:03 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Dan Feldman had spent plenty of time outdoors working on his parents’ farm in Bowdoin, Maine but he had never spent a night in the woods before striking out on the Appalachian Trail in 2002. Fresh out of graduate school, he was looking for an adventure. He was woefully unprepared. “I think when you’re in your 20s, everyone has an urge to get out and do something different,” he said. “You hear about folks going to Europe to backpack or people going to work in Alaska or somewhere different to get away from the grind. I wanted to do something...

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Local group wants Marquette to be named a Trail Town

Posted by on Oct 24, 2013 @ 1:45 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Local group wants Marquette to be named a Trail Town

North Country Trail Hikers wants people to know at least one thing about Marquette, MI: A trail runs through it. NCTH, the first chartered chapter of the North Country Trail Association, wants Marquette to receive Trail Town designation. Being named a Trail Town creates a relationship between the town and its community, trail and the NCTA. The North Country National Scenic Trail at 4,600 miles is the longest of the national scenic trails, stretching from New York to North Dakota. The NCT Hikers take care of the section of the trail that runs...

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Shutdown of Great Smoky Mountains National Park delays Chimney Tops Trail repairs

Posted by on Oct 23, 2013 @ 12:06 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Phase 2 of the ongoing full trail rehabilitation on Chimney Tops Trail in Great Smoky Mountains National Park will be on hiatus until 2014. Work will resume in the spring. The recently-ended partial government shutdown has pushed the project behind schedule. “We’re not going to resume any construction this year,” Park spokeswoman Dana Soehn said. “The Chimney Tops rehabilitation was certainly impacted by the shutdown because the crew lost three weeks of work.” This wasn’t the first delay. The trail was closed from January, when high flood...

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A Guide to Hiking Glaciers in America

Posted by on Oct 22, 2013 @ 9:03 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Glaciers are one of nature’s most awe-inspiring spectacles. Constantly evolving rivers of slow-moving ice, glaciers have existed for many millennia. During the Ice Age, huge swaths of North America were covered by icefields and glaciers. The end of the Ice Age brought massive changes to our continent. Ice sheets melted, revealing mountain peaks and valleys. After the big melt brought on by the end of the Ice Age, large glaciers remained. Hundreds of glaciers still exist in the U.S. Some you can hike on during guided tours. Some you can...

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The Case of the Golden-winged Warbler

Posted by on Oct 22, 2013 @ 5:02 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

In summer, the Golden-winged Warbler flits among the thorny blackberry bushes and spiky yellow goldenrod up here, on top of the highest points in the Appalachians. These rounded, stone-strewn humps are the “Highlands of Roan” and as their name suggests, they very much resemble the misty highlands of Scotland—mostly bald compared to the surrounding hillsides of mature forest and carpeted with long grass the color of ponies. Very few people care about the Golden-Winged warbler, and even fewer make it up this high in the Appalachians—above 5,000...

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Solano Land Trust Rockville Trails hike to focus on geology of the area

Posted by on Oct 22, 2013 @ 5:00 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Solano Land Trust Rockville Trails hike to focus on geology of the area

Looking around the Rockville Trails Preserve in California is likely to bring to mind one singular question: Where did all those rocks come from? In all shapes and sizes, rocks adorn the landscape of the Solano Land Trust’s newest preserve, which is accessible only through docent-led hikes. Now the trust has decided to help the curious answer that rocky question with a free guided hike at the preserve from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Nov. 2. Hikers will explore the preserve with docent Lorenzo Burch. Are the rocks related to the collision of...

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Zion National Park constructs new irrigation system; hiking, cycling trail detours

Posted by on Oct 21, 2013 @ 7:18 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Zion National Park will begin construction of a new river irrigation system on Oct. 22. During the first phase, which is expected to be completed in April 2014, a half-mile section of the Pa’rus Trail will be closed. The irrigation project will replace the current open irrigation system with a pressurized pipe line system, which will improve irrigation efficiency, increase the areas irrigated with nonculinary water, and decrease the required maintenance on the open ditch system. During the construction, a half-mile section of the Pa’rus Trail...

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Vaughn Creek Greenway set to open

Posted by on Oct 21, 2013 @ 2:49 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Tryon, NC residents and visitors will soon have another trail to enjoy as Vaughn Creek Greenway is set to open to the public in a couple of weeks. Although work to the trail was slowed this summer because of excessive rains, the work did meet a grant deadline. Most of the work on the trail to meet the deadline was completed recently. Obtaining the land and grants to open the trail has been ongoing since around 2005. The summer of 2013 was not the time to attempt an outdoor construction project because of the rain, but in hindsight the...

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Sydney’s national parks closed to tourists

Posted by on Oct 21, 2013 @ 7:02 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

According the Office of Environment and Heritage of New South Wales, all Greater Sydney Metropolitan Area national parks have been closed as fierce bushfires continue to burn outside of the Australian city. Remote campgrounds in the Royal National Park, to the south of the city, have also been closed. The Blue Mountains area to the north-west of Sydney, a popular day trip destination, has been worst affected as fires burned close to the tourist towns of Blackheath and Katoomba. Mount Wilson, the picturesque village which was used for filming...

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Top-notch hiking in the Adirondacks

Posted by on Oct 20, 2013 @ 10:00 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Top-notch hiking in the Adirondacks

Adirondack Park encompasses 6 million acres of hills and mountains, rivers and lakes, farms and forestlands in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York, the largest protected area in the United States outside of Alaska, and a unique public-private partnership where conservation and civilization not only coexist but thrive. Within the park, and preceding its formation, is the Adirondack Forest Preserve, some 2.7 million acres of state-owned lands that are designated as “forever wild.” For hikers, the Adirondacks represent not only...

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Trekking with llamas on the Holyoke Range

Posted by on Oct 20, 2013 @ 9:40 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

By Patricia Harris | GLOBE CORRESPONDENT When I arrived at Pinetum Farm I found that my hiking companion for the morning would be Stone, a mature fellow with a few gray streaks in his dark locks. He liked to hum as we hiked through the woods — when he wasn’t chomping on pine boughs, maple saplings, and ferns. Stone is one of 12 llamas in the Pinetum Farm herd, and, truth be told, he’s rather blasé about hiking. The chance to browse seems to be what lures him out of the barn. Dave and Karen Seiffert started keeping llamas in 1994 after earlier...

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Geography in the News: America’s Hiking Trails

Posted by on Oct 19, 2013 @ 8:32 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Geography in the News: America’s Hiking Trails

Fall of each year, many long-distance hikers are finishing up their hikes for the year as winter approaches, while others are making plans to begin their odesseys the following spring. While many yearn to attempt long-distance hikes, most seldom complete their journeys. Even among those who do complete their dream, only a very few attempt to set records on their journey. In 2007, Francis Tapon became the first person to “yo-yo” the Continental Divide Trail—that is, hike from one end of the trail in New Mexico all the way to Canada and back....

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The Call of the ‘Wild’ on the Pacific Crest Trail

Posted by on Oct 19, 2013 @ 5:59 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Pacific Crest Trail, a 2,650-mile hiking and equestrian trail that reaches from Mexico to Canada, has been called the Appalachian Trail of the West Coast. But that description does it a disservice, for the Pacific trail is longer, wilder, more punishing and also grander than its East Coast cousin. Starting in desert chaparral near the Mexican border, the route climbs (and climbs some more) along the spine of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade ranges as it pushes relentlessly northward. It crosses the western arm of the Mojave Desert. It...

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Long, vigorous hikes take toll on feet, ankles

Posted by on Oct 19, 2013 @ 8:45 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

As brightly colored leaves dazzle the fall landscape, hikers nationwide will migrate to woods and fields but many, unfortunately, are ill prepared for the beating their feet will take, warns a foot and ankle surgeon. Walking up and down steep hillsides and tramping through wet, slippery fields and wooded areas puts stress on the muscles and tendons in the feet and ankles, especially if you haven’t conditioned properly before hitting the trail. Also, many don’t realize that cross-training athletic shoes aren’t the best choice for extended...

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Men may face felony charges after toppling Goblin Valley formation

Posted by on Oct 18, 2013 @ 3:23 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

A group of Boy Scout leaders is potentially facing felony charges for destroying a rock formation millions of years old in Emery County, Utah. The trio of men was adventuring in Goblin Valley State Park when they decided to film themselves knocking over one of the formations, known as “goblins.” They said later it appeared to them that it was ready to fall and might hurt someone. In the video, posted on Facebook, one man can be seen leveraging himself against a nearby rock and pushing a formation over. “Some little kid was...

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Rare hike offered to see Waynesville watershed

Posted by on Oct 18, 2013 @ 7:07 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Once again the Town of Waynesville, NC is offering its popular Waynesville Watershed Hike, which offers hikers a walk through a portion of its 8,600-acre protected tract of land that is usually off-limits to the public. This year’s hike will be from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, and features naturalist Don Hendershot and Peter Bates, associate professor of natural resources at Western North Carolina. Hendershot will talk about the flora and fauna, and Bates will answer questions about the watershed property and forest management...

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Hiking one of Missouri’s prettiest trails

Posted by on Oct 17, 2013 @ 12:01 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hiking one of Missouri’s prettiest trails

Missouri has been named the “Best Trails State” by American Trails, a national, nonprofit organization working on behalf of the nation’s trails systems. The award is presented every two years to the state that has made tremendous contributions to promote and improve its trails. Missouri State Parks has more than 230 trails in 58 parks and historic sites. A guide to all of them, “Trails of Missouri State Parks,” is available at MoStateParks.com and helps visitors choose a hiking trail based on their needs and skill levels. For veteran outdoors...

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Luzon Blog: Easy trekking around Sagada

Posted by on Oct 17, 2013 @ 8:11 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Unlike much of the rest of Southeast Asia, the Philippines is not yet a backpacker destination, although things are evolving on this front. The southern island of Palawan draws budget travelers, but beyond that skinny land mass, the other major concentration of backpacking activity is in the middle of Luzon’s Cordillera: the small mountain hamlet of Sagada. Sagada is tiny enough as is, and the amount of backpackers pales in comparison to locations like Thailand, Cambodia or Laos. Still, the area provides exactly what a young budget...

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GOP asks: Why were national parks shut down, anyway?

Posted by on Oct 16, 2013 @ 11:14 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

House Republicans plan to take aim at the Obama administration on Oct. 16 for temporarily shuttering properties managed by the National Park Service during the federal government shutdown, spotlighting what has become an emotional battleground in the grinding impasse. Interior Department Secretary Sally Jewell agreed last week to allow states to cover the costs of operating the country’s 401 Park Service properties. But Republican lawmakers and local community officials in some communities affected by the shutdown are raising questions...

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Bozrah considers hiking trails for Maples Farm Park

Posted by on Oct 16, 2013 @ 11:04 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A network of linked trails for hiking, mountain biking, and even horseback riding could be in store for wooded land at Maples Farm Park in Connecticut. Town officials are reviewing a proposal to build the trails on 25 acres of the 31-acre town park off 45 Bozrah St. “That’s a good and valid use for that land,” First Selectman Bill Ballinger said. An engineer from Tahawus Trails, a professional trail-building firm, visited the site in August. The firm proposes developing between one-and-a-half and two miles of non-motorized trails on the site....

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Crater Lake subject of new lidar map from Oregon Department of Geology

Posted by on Oct 14, 2013 @ 4:47 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Oregon continues to lead the country in lidar mapping technology with the recent release by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries’ third in its series of geologic guides and recreation maps of iconic Oregon places. The Crater Lake Geologic Guide and Recreation Map, produced by cartographer Daniel E. Coe, is published on water and tear-resistant paper and carries a cover price of $6. This double-sided folding map shows all Crater Lake National Park trails, including the Pacific Crest Trail, as well as highways and park...

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National Parks losing revenue under shutdown

Posted by on Oct 14, 2013 @ 4:30 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

National Parks losing revenue under shutdown

The government shutdown that started nearly three weeks ago has cost the National Park Service nearly half a million dollars in entrance fees and tens of millions of dollars in visitor spending each day, according to a group representing the agency’s retirees. The Coalition of National Park Service Retirees estimated that the park system has missed out on about 715,000 visitors daily, based on October 2012 attendance numbers, according to a statement from the organization. The group calculated that the tourism drop off has cost $450,000 each...

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Hiking with hunters: Are you safe?

Posted by on Oct 13, 2013 @ 7:52 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Autumn is considered by many to be one of the best seasons to enjoy the outdoors in Colorado. The mountains are especially popular this time of year, as the cool dry air provides the perfect atmosphere for those seeking a moderate workout unaccompanied by sweat-drenched clothes and high elevation sunburns. The quality of scenery throughout the state increases significantly during the fall, as leaves expose vibrant pigments, and wildlife sightings surge as many species scramble to prepare for the harsh cold ahead. Combined, these seasonal...

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Montana man plans to trek entire Continental Divide by snowshoe

Posted by on Oct 12, 2013 @ 9:18 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Richard Layne probably won’t have any competition for tent space at Glacier National Park’s fabled Hole in the Wall campground when he gets there. With a tentative reservation for sometime in April 2016, he hopes to have that tip of the Rocky Mountains to himself. In fact, Layne plans to be plenty lonely for the next three winters as he travels Montana’s whole Continental Divide by snowshoe. “I think all human beings live for the challenge, and I just happen to live for it in a certain way,” the 62-year-old Helena resident said. “I believe...

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Some Pacific Crest Trail hikers forced to use highways

Posted by on Oct 12, 2013 @ 10:08 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Stormy politics and snowy weather are posing extra challenges for this year’s crop of through-hikers on the Pacific Crest Trail. If the snow doesn’t stop them, the government shutdown just might. The last of this year’s Pacific Crest Trail through-hikers face tough challenges as they try to finish their 2,600-mile trek from Mexico to Canada. Most were forced off the trail after several feet of snow fell in higher elevations of the Cascades last week. Some are now walking to the Canadian border along highways. A few hardy hikers are still...

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New Siskiyou Crest hiking book calls for action

Posted by on Oct 11, 2013 @ 6:06 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

New Siskiyou Crest hiking book calls for action

Luke Ruediger has penned a hiking book that’s also a call for action to support the proposed Siskiyou Crest National Monument. After eight years of work, Ruediger self-published “The Siskiyou Crest: Hikes, History & Ecology” this year. He walked all 76 hikes featured in the book — sometimes more than once. Ruediger, who lives in a remote area above Applegate Lake, is a lifelong Southern Oregon resident and has been hiking the Siskiyou Mountains for two decades. The 34-year-old is an advocate for the Siskiyou Crest...

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Trail would be cheaper than subsidizing rail, NY citizens say

Posted by on Oct 11, 2013 @ 8:42 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

In 1996, New York State allowed train advocates a five-year opportunity to develop rail services, through private investment, along an inactive 90-mile rail line through the Adirondacks from Old Forge to Lake Placid. Despite tens of millions of dollars of state money spent to rehabilitate and maintain it, most of that rail line is now essentially abandoned. A nine-mile seasonal tourist railroad from Lake Placid to Saranac Lake contributes little to the region’s economy. More than 12,000 people and 350 local businesses have petitioned...

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Feds to let states pay to open parks

Posted by on Oct 10, 2013 @ 8:42 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Obama administration said October 10 it will allow states to use their own money to reopen some national parks that have been closed because of the government shutdown. Governors in at least four states have asked for authority to reopen national parks within their borders because of the economic impacts caused by the park closures. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the government will consider offers to pay for park operations, but will not surrender control of national parks or monuments to the states. Utah Gov. Gary Herbert said his...

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Hiking Trails Are “Open For Business” Outside The National Park In East Tennessee

Posted by on Oct 9, 2013 @ 2:55 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The hiking options in East Tennessee are abundant, despite the closure of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. From state parks to greenway trails to hidden gems in the middle of the city, there are trails to challenge experienced hikers and scenic views along meandering paths for novice explorers. “People can stay in the mountains and hike in the mountains outside of the national park, or they can choose walking trails that take them through parks in more developed areas, but that still provide interesting sites along the way and great...

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Alejandra “RocketLlama” Wilson’s first person account of 8-days in a snow storm on the PCT

Posted by on Oct 8, 2013 @ 8:57 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The newspapers reported her dilemma: Search on for 3 hikers in trouble on Pacific Crest Trail in Wash. Rescuers were searching for four hikers Oct. 1 in remote parts of southwest Washington, including three people who walked all the way from Mexico on the Pacific Crest Trail only to run into early season snowfall on their trek to the Canadian border. Skamania County Undersheriff Dave Cox says two of the Pacific Crest Trail hikers, Matt Margiotta and Kyla Arnold, wisely called for help Sept. 30 after snow obscured their route. Six ground...

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