News

13 Giant Companies Make Big Climate Pledges

Posted by on Jul 28, 2015 @ 10:16 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Thirteen giant companies joined the Obama administration’s Act on Climate initiative, announcing at least $140 billion in new low-carbon investment and more than 1,600 megawatts (MW) of new renewable energy, the White House said. The pledge from Coca-Cola, Walmart, Apple, Google, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, and other big-name companies comes in advance of the United Nations climate talks in Paris at the end of the year, and is meant to demonstrate industry support for strong carbon reduction goals. “We recognize that delaying action on...

read more

Hiking trails around Annapurna deemed safe after Nepal quake

Posted by on Jul 27, 2015 @ 8:46 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The most popular trekking trail in Nepal escaped damage during April’s devastating earthquake and is safe for hikers to return, an assessment team said. Kit Miyamoto of the California-based engineering firm Miyamoto International assessed the 125 miles of trekking trails around Mount Annapurna, and said that the only hazards were found at three spots and appeared to predate the quake. Only about 3 percent of the accommodations on the trail were damaged by the April 25 earthquake. That quake, coupled with another in May, killed nearly...

read more

How To Prevent Your Dog From Overheating On The Hiking Trail

Posted by on Jul 27, 2015 @ 8:36 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

This summer has brought extreme temperatures to many U.S. states. Human hikers know that it’s important to carry enough water, wear loose-fitting clothes and wear a wide-brimmed hat when venturing out in temperatures that have been getting up to 100 degrees. But what about their canine companions? They don’t have the same options to shield them against the heat; all they can do is to follow wherever they are led. Sometimes this can have deadly consequences. The symptoms of an overheated dog include: Skin that is hot to the touch, heavy...

read more

Public Land Under Siege: US Wilderness

Posted by on Jul 26, 2015 @ 6:14 am in Conservation | 0 comments

On the 26th of March 2015, the United States’ senate voted to pass SA 838, a budget amendment that constitutes the first step in allowing the transfer of certain types of federal land into the stewardship of individual states and paving the way for the sale of these lands to private concerns. The amendment, proposed by Alaskan senator Lisa Murkowski, garnered 51 “yeas” against 49 “nays”. This occurred despite the fact that the amendment enjoys very little support by the constituents represented by such a vote. For what reasons would the US...

read more

Asheville hiker Davis elected to Appalachian Trail board

Posted by on Jul 26, 2015 @ 2:24 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Asheville hiker Davis elected to Appalachian Trail board

Record-setting speed hiker Jennifer Pharr Davis, of Asheville, has been elected to the board of directors of The Appalachian Trail Conservancy. The board is responsible for communicating the mission of the ATC, and enhancing the public standing of the ATC by ensuring legal and ethical integrity and practicing fiscal responsibility. Davis is an avid hiker and Appalachian Trail enthusiast, having thru-hiked the entirety of the 2,190-mile Trail three times. On one of those hikes, in 2011, she set the fastest known time on the AT – 46 days, 11...

read more

Thru-Hiking the Idaho Centennial Trail

Posted by on Jul 25, 2015 @ 10:07 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Idaho Centennial Trail is more of an idea than a completed trail. Running from the desert bordering Nevada clear to the cool mountain forests of north Idaho, the trail covers between 900 and 1,200 miles of the state. “I would guess 10 people have thru-hiked it,” said Clay Jacobson. “In history.” Jacobson’s goal this summer is to join the ranks of those ambitious hikers. On June 30, 2015, he and his girlfriend, as well as two other friends, started out on the border of Idaho and Nevada—ready to begin their...

read more

Fossil fuel companies impose more in climate costs than they make in profits

Posted by on Jul 25, 2015 @ 4:03 am in Conservation | 0 comments

It is fairly well understood by now that releasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere imposes an economic cost, in the form of climate change impacts. In most cases, however, those responsible for carbon emissions are not required to pay that cost. Instead, it’s borne mainly by the world’s poor and low-lying countries, and of course by future generations, as many of the worst impacts of climate change will emerge years after the emissions that drive them. People sometimes refer to the unpaid cost of...

read more

How Walking in Nature Changes the Brain

Posted by on Jul 24, 2015 @ 2:58 am in Hiking News | 2 comments

How Walking in Nature Changes the Brain

Taking a stroll in the park may soothe the mind and, in the process, change the workings of our brains in ways that improve mental health, according to a new study of the physical effects on the brain of visiting nature. Most of us today live in cities and spend far less time outside in green, natural spaces than people did several generations ago. City dwellers also have a higher risk for anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses than people living outside urban centers, studies show. These developments seem to be linked to some extent,...

read more

Earth’s Most Famous Climate Scientist Issues Bombshell Sea Level Warning

Posted by on Jul 23, 2015 @ 7:38 am in Conservation | 0 comments

In what may prove to be a turning point for political action on climate change, a breathtaking new study casts extreme doubt about the near-term stability of global sea levels. The study—written by James Hansen, NASA’s former lead climate scientist, and 16 co-authors, many of whom are considered among the top in their fields—concludes that glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica will melt 10 times faster than previous consensus estimates, resulting in sea level rise of at least 10 feet in as little as 50 years. The study, which has not yet been...

read more

Progress on Bipartisan Plan to Reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund

Posted by on Jul 23, 2015 @ 1:13 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Progress on Bipartisan Plan to Reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chairman Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Ranking Member Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) announced a bipartisan agreement to permanently authorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund. The law’s current 25-year authorization expires on September 30, 2015. “This is a huge step forward at a critical time because the program’s current authorization will expire in less than 70 days,” said Alan Rowsome, Senior Director of Government Relations for Lands at The Wilderness Society and Co-Chair of the Land and Water...

read more

The Perfect Itinerary for Sequoia + Kings Canyon National Parks

Posted by on Jul 22, 2015 @ 9:10 am in Hiking News | 1 comment

California is fortunate to be home to nine national parks, more than any other state. With such a plethora of natural and national treasures, it may not come as a surprise that two of the state’s most spectacular parks, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, are often overlooked. While typically referred to together, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks are actually two distinct but contiguous parks located in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains. Kings Canyon lies to the north and Sequoia to the south. Other than iconic giant sequoia trees that...

read more

Hiking the Great Walks on New Zealand’s rugged South Island

Posted by on Jul 22, 2015 @ 9:02 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Several items are essential for exploring the magical Southern Alps mountains that run across New Zealand’s South Island: insect repellent, rain gear and ear plugs. The repellent is to ward off sandflies, those annoying black bugs that are the itchy scourge of hikers in Fiordland National Park. The park, which is bigger than Yosemite and Yellowstone national parks combined, is one of the wettest places on earth. It gets an average 280 inches of rainfall a year, compared to Seattle, Washington’s 38. And while there’s plenty...

read more

AccuWeather Launches AccUcast, Providing Exclusive Crowdsourced Weather Feature Worldwide

Posted by on Jul 21, 2015 @ 8:00 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

AccuWeather Launches AccUcast, Providing Exclusive Crowdsourced Weather Feature Worldwide

AccuWeather Global Weather Center – July 21, 2015 – AccuWeather, Inc., the global leader in weather information and digital media, today introduced AccUcast™, an exciting interactive crowdsourcing feature available in the AccuWeather universal iOS app where users can now share their local weather updates. AccUcast is the only crowdsourcing tool with live crowdsourced weather maps that provide current weather conditions submitted by users in a global animation display. AccuWeather designed and developed AccUcast to help people worldwide make...

read more

Red Rock Country: What Locals Wished You Knew

Posted by on Jul 21, 2015 @ 11:41 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Red Rock Country: What Locals Wished You Knew

“There are two easy ways to die in the desert: thirst or drowning. This place is stained with such ironies, a tension set between the need to find water and the need to get away from it. The floods that come with the least warning arrive at the hottest time of the year, when the last thing on a person’s mind is too much water.” The Red Rock Country of Southern Utah is high desert at 5,000 feet, and is sometimes called Color Country or Canyon Country. It’s known for its wide open views, hoo doos, arches, red rocks and sand, mesas,...

read more

EPA to study effects of Roundup on 1,500 endangered species

Posted by on Jul 21, 2015 @ 6:26 am in Conservation | 0 comments

300 million pounds of glyphosate are used in the U.S. each year, but its impacts are largely unknown. For more than a decade, milkweed, that tall green plant with purple or orange flowers, has been rapidly declining in Midwestern states. Little research has been done on the abundance of milkweed in Western states, though many scientists suspect it may be struggling as well. That’s because Western monarch butterflies, which depend on milkweed for food and habitat, have declined by nearly 90 percent in the past two decades. Both of these...

read more

English national park’s are brimming with nature’s riches

Posted by on Jul 20, 2015 @ 8:45 am in Conservation | 0 comments

English national park’s are brimming with nature’s riches

A stock-take of the 10 parks established to preserve the England’s natural riches shows how they have become vital sanctuaries for a wonderful array of threatened and rare plants and animals. While the national parks cover only 10 per cent of England, they contain a high proportion of habitats such as heath, fen and ancient woodland that have been lost over the centuries. The range and variety of landscapes and natural features found in England’s National Parks helps explain why they are so special. In Northumberland, for instance, we find...

read more

Keeping Alive The Korean Love For Hiking, Thousands Of Miles From Korea

Posted by on Jul 20, 2015 @ 8:27 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Mountains cover 70 percent of the Korean peninsula, and in South Korea, an estimated 1 in 3 Koreans goes hiking more than once a month. Over the past few decades, hiking has become way more than a weekend activity. It’s part of the Korean national identity. Across the Pacific Ocean in Southern California, second- and even third-generation children of Korean immigrants are keeping alive and well a tradition that connects them to their ancestral homeland. LA’s Griffith Park comprises 4,000 acres where dusty trails weave up and down...

read more

Hiking the Appalachian Trail: Meet on the ledges

Posted by on Jul 19, 2015 @ 9:23 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Appalachian Trail north of Damascus, Virginia, follows a portion of the Virginia Creeper Trail, a popular 35-mile rail trail, before climbing into the high country of grassy bald summits and spruce-fir forests of the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area, which contains 5,000 acres of terrain over 4,000 feet in elevation. At 5,729 feet, heavily forested Mount Rogers is the highest peak in Virginia. The highlight of this beautiful section of trail, which also includes Grayson Highlands State Park, is the herd of feral ponies, about the...

read more

Study Show High-Risk Areas for Lyme Disease Growing

Posted by on Jul 19, 2015 @ 4:14 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Study Show High-Risk Areas for Lyme Disease Growing

The geographic areas where Lyme disease is a bigger danger have grown dramatically, according to a new government study published this week. U.S. cases remain concentrated in the Northeast and upper Midwest. But now more areas in those regions are considered high risk. “The risk is expanding, in all directions,” said the lead author, Kiersten Kugeler of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There are now 260 counties where the number of Lyme disease cases is at least twice what’s expected, given the size of each...

read more

Temporary Trail Closure Announced Due to Wildfire in McDowell County, NC

Posted by on Jul 18, 2015 @ 11:58 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

NEBO, N.C., July 18, 2015 – An estimated 2 acre wildfire burning on Forest Service land near Bald Knob in McDowell County will require temporary closure of a section of the Mountains to Sea Trail between the footbridge over the North Fork of the Catawba River and Dobson Knob Road (Forest Service Road 106). The trail closure will be in effect until fire is declared controlled. Forest Service officials are asking the public to avoid this area for their own safety and the safety of emergency response personnel on scene. The Bald Knob fire...

read more

Hartman Creek State Park, Wisconsin trails are up for adoption

Posted by on Jul 18, 2015 @ 10:45 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hartman Creek State Park, covering 1,500 acres in Waupaca and Portage counties in Wisconsin, draws visitors for many reasons. With six lakes within park boundaries or adjacent to it, a stream and several wetlands, well maintained campgrounds (even a teepee), swimming beach, historic log cabin, interpretive programs by a trained naturalist and natural beauty for all senses in all seasons, what is not to like? The park also offers some great trails, including specialty trails. And though these draw users from all over the state, and beyond,...

read more

Where to Go Hiking in Cape Town

Posted by on Jul 18, 2015 @ 10:38 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

There is no shortage of hiking trails and mountains in Cape Town, South Africa but make sure you know the basics before you embark on your voyage. The walking and hiking trail options in Cape Town are virtually endless, from Table Mountain to Lion’s Head, Signal Hill to Kirstenbosch. Just make sure you do your research, carry water, and have a reliable map—and whatever you do, please don’t wear sandals. In the summertime, it’s best to schedule your hike in the early morning to avoid high temperatures and hordes of people...

read more

Appalachian Trail record breaker summonsed on Katahdin

Posted by on Jul 17, 2015 @ 3:03 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The man who set a new record for speed traversing the Appalachian Trail, Scott Jurek, was issued three summonses by rangers on Mt. Katahdin. After completing his 46-day run, state park rangers issued him summonses for public drinking, littering and hiking with an oversize group. Katahdin is the northern terminus of the Appalachian Trail and lays inside the boundary of Baxter State Park, which is managed as back country. The Appalachian Trail is a National Park and federally regulated. The trail extends into the park by agreement of two...

read more

A beginner’s glossary to hiking and camping

Posted by on Jul 16, 2015 @ 9:59 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Don’t know your karst from your krummholz? Do you think holloway is used solely as a surname? Brush up on your hiking and camping terms with our glossary. That pile of rocks and gravel on a mountainside? There’s a word for that. Wilderness travel takes more than a pair of strong legs; it requires common sense. An ability to read the land and a basic understanding of trail conditions can be the difference between embarking on a hard slog and pure bliss. Learning the lingo is part of the process, saving novices from grief and providing...

read more

Idaho mining dispute raises questions about the future of wilderness

Posted by on Jul 16, 2015 @ 12:30 am in Conservation | 0 comments

A grandfathered mining claim has opened the doors to development in the Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness. “Nothing in this Act shall prevent within national forest wilderness areas any activity, including prospecting, for the purpose of gathering information about mineral or other resources, if such activity is carried on in a manner compatible with the preservation of the wilderness environment.” — The Wilderness Act “Be it enacted… that all valuable mineral deposits in lands belonging to the United States, both...

read more

Land and Water Conservation Fund Protects Trail Experiences

Posted by on Jul 15, 2015 @ 9:10 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Land and Water Conservation Fund Protects Trail Experiences

Major national scenic trails such as the Appalachian Trail, Continental Divide Trail, and Pacific Crest Trail traverse thousands of miles across our beautiful country. Hikers attempting a thru-hike or continuous hike of the trails travel through literally scores of national forests and national parks, and scattered parcels of private land. The private land along the trails is shrinking due, in large part, to the success of a federal conservation program. The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) is used to buy private land from willing...

read more

Something’s Changing in North Carolina: First Major Wind Project in the South Breaks Ground

Posted by on Jul 15, 2015 @ 3:10 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Big news from North Carolina – wind company Iberdola and retail giant Amazon broke ground on a new wind farm in northeastern North Carolina that’s not only the first major wind farm in the state, but the first major wind project in the South. It’s an empty field now, but this area in northeastern North Carolina will soon be home to some towering wind turbines that will provide 208 megawatts of clean energy – enough to power 60,000 homes – and Amazon will buy that electricity to help meet its goal of being 100...

read more

How Big Water is trying to stop the National Park Service from cleaning up plastic bottles

Posted by on Jul 14, 2015 @ 10:41 am in Conservation | 0 comments

How Big Water is trying to stop the National Park Service from cleaning up plastic bottles

The National Park Service thought it had a good strategy for reining in the discarded water bottles that clog the trash cans and waste stream of the national parks: stop selling disposable bottles and let visitors refill reusable ones with public drinking water. But Big Water has stepped in to block the parks from banning the plastic pollutants — and the industry found an ally on Capitol Hill to add a little-noticed amendment to a House spending bill that would kill the policy. As environmental groups and local officials campaign for a sales...

read more

Conservationists Want You to Stop Building Rock Piles

Posted by on Jul 14, 2015 @ 5:08 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Cairns have a long history and purpose, one that newer stacks sometimes subvert. The Gorham Mountain Trail at Acadia National park winds up through a forested mountain slope before bursting out onto one of the granite-boulder covered summits for which the park is famous. But once you get up there, following the loop back down would be tricky if it weren’t for rock stacks built by Waldron Bates — they feature a long flat rock supported by two legs and a smaller rock pointing in the direction of the trail. For centuries, humans have been...

read more

Nature Is Speaking

Posted by on Jul 13, 2015 @ 3:55 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Nature Is Speaking

Nature doesn’t need people. People need Nature. Human beings are part of Nature. Nature is not dependent on human beings to exist. Human beings, on the other hand, are totally dependent on Nature to exist. The growing number of people on the planet and how we live here is going to determine the future of Nature . And the future of us. Nature will go on, no matter what. It will evolve. The question is, will it be with us, or without us? If Nature could talk, it would probably say it doesn’t much matter either way. We must...

read more

New Highpointing Speed Record

Posted by on Jul 12, 2015 @ 8:47 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Scott Jurek’s wasn’t the only new speed record today. Josh Sanders and his sister Lindsay broke the world speed record for highpointing the lower 48 United States. Driving thousands of miles, hiking hundreds of miles, and climbing over 250,000 vertical feet of mountains in less than 23 days. They began on June 23, 2015 and finished on July 12. 19 days, 7 hours, 37 minutes. So they broke the previous record by three days. Learn more about this unusual accomplishment here and here. More information will be posted as it becomes...

read more

Jurek beats Davis’ Appalachian Trail record by mere hours

Posted by on Jul 12, 2015 @ 2:32 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Jurek beats Davis’ Appalachian Trail record by mere hours

Scott Jurek, renowned champion long distance runner, today broke the Appalachian Trail (AT) speed record previously set by Jennifer Pharr Davis of Asheville, NC in 2011 by just three hours. The difference, over the 2,189-mile AT, was akin to a photo finish. Jurek climbed Mt. Katahdin in Maine on Sunday, July 12, 2015, the 47th day after he started at Springer Mountain, Georgia. To accomplish the feat, Jurek had to average more than 46 miles per day for six and a half weeks. Jurek’s, and Davis’, accomplishments will always be...

read more

Hike through vineyards and lemon trees in Italy’s Cinque Terre

Posted by on Jul 12, 2015 @ 2:08 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

From the top of a steep hillside covered in lemon trees and grapevines, the village of Manarola tumbles out below, like a handful of pink, orange and yellow blocks that have been shaken, then poured from a toy bag. Manarola is one of five hamlets strewn a few miles apart along the Mediterranean coast in Northern Italy. Each comes with its own personality, and the best way to see the lot is to pick one as a home base, then spend a few days hiking between them, pausing to sip wine, eat grilled octopus and cool off with a swim in the sea. Hike...

read more

Wild Walk gives NY museum visitors treetop view of forest

Posted by on Jul 11, 2015 @ 4:56 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A new wooden walkway in New York’s Adirondack Mountains takes nature lovers on a tour of the treetops to let them experience the forest from the perspective of the birds and beasts that live there. The $5.5 million Wild Walk is set on the 80 wooded acres of the Wild Center, an interactive natural history museum in Tupper Lake, NY. It opened Saturday, July 4, 2015. The elevated trail has a series of winding bridges and platforms 40 feet above the ground. Visitors can climb through a realistic four-story replica of a hollow pine tree,...

read more