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Next Level Trails in Chattanooga, Tennessee

Posted by on Apr 13, 2019 @ 8:38 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Next Level Trails in Chattanooga, Tennessee

Chattanooga, Tennessee, may have the coolest backyard ever. Less than 10 miles from the city center, Mountain Creek Park will offer the community an urban recreation experience with 8 to 12 miles of natural surface trails for beginner to expert mountain bike riding, exceptional bouldering, and hiking trails for scenic exploration. With 800 feet of vertical drop and swarms of gnarly rock formations, the park will also provide some serious stoke with the first advanced downhill-style trails in the Chattanooga region. Mountain Creek Park is the...

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Poetry graces popular park trails

Posted by on Apr 12, 2019 @ 8:27 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Poetry graces popular park trails

Nature is pure poetry, judging by the artwork on Olympic National Park trails. The North Olympic Library System (NOLS) has teamed up with Olympic National Park to offer a sixth season of Poetry Walks. This year’s will continue through May 31, 2019. It features inspiring poetry along four park trails. During Poetry Walks, poems are placed on signs on the Hall of Mosses Trail, the Living Forest Trail, the Madison Creek Falls Trail and the Peabody Creek Trail. With the exception of the Hall of Mosses Trail, access to these trails is free. The...

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An Appalachian Trail Thru-Hiker On The Need To Protect Our Wild Spaces

Posted by on Apr 11, 2019 @ 8:05 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

An Appalachian Trail Thru-Hiker On The Need To Protect Our Wild Spaces

This year on her birthday, Carolyn Burman decided to do a solo hike in one of her favorite state parks in Connecticut. She has magical memories of that trek. She grew up hiking it — her mother even went into labor with her while walking the path. She looked forward to a peaceful, reflective experience in nature. Instead, she found something else. “There was so much garbage in the park,” 26-year-old Burman says. “Plastic seltzer bottles in the stream that floats by the trail, a Dunkin’ Donuts cup…. I go out on this joyful hike on my birthday,...

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The Adirondacks: Hiking America’s Original Wilderness

Posted by on Apr 9, 2019 @ 10:19 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Adirondacks: Hiking America’s Original Wilderness

Many are those who say the Adirondacks are unique. That may be an overused word, but in numerous ways the region is distinctive, and in some cases even certifiably unique. Let’s consider some of those ways. The Adirondacks are big. Not vertically, which is what most people think of when they hear the word “big” associated with mountains, but horizontally. Consider the Adirondack Park, for all intents and purposes the most useful packaging of the region. The park is defined by its famous Blue Line, so-called because somebody drew the original...

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Hiking Mississippi’s Scenic Trails

Posted by on Apr 9, 2019 @ 8:41 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hiking Mississippi’s Scenic Trails

Searching for the best places in Mississippi for hiking and camping? A University of Mississippi staff member knows exactly where to find the best trails. Shannon Richardson, assistant director of campus recreation, has been supervising Ole Miss Outdoors for the past 14 years. Through her position, the Oakwood, Georgia, native has been on countless Mississippi trails. “My parents were avid campers and hikers, and I grew up going to state and national parks and other natural areas,” Richardson said. “I’ve hiked trails from the Grand Canyon to...

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‘The Hiking Vikings’ Make Appalachian Trail Signs

Posted by on Apr 8, 2019 @ 6:47 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

‘The Hiking Vikings’ Make Appalachian Trail Signs

Appalachian Trail thru-hikers agree that the sign on Mount Katahdin in Maine signifies the pinnacle of a journey that changes you forever. A local couple who completed their thru-hike in 2015 found there were signs along the way that held life-altering messages too. Nate and Sharon Harrington, known to those on the trail as “The Hiking Vikings,” started their hike on Feb. 10, 2015 and reached the summit at Mount Katahdin on July 12. That’s 153 consecutive days of togetherness that, according to Nate, “sealed the deal.” Many AT hikers start...

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What are the Best Restaurants on the Appalachian Trail?

Posted by on Apr 7, 2019 @ 9:56 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

What are the Best Restaurants on the Appalachian Trail?

From the perspective of a thru-hiker, there are few things that matter more than the meals to be devoured upon reaching the next town. After a few consecutive days of cold tuna, ramen, and beef jerky, hikers’ dreams are infiltrated with visions of bacon cheeseburgers, pepperoni pizzas, and Ben and Jerry’s. When you’re few hundred miles south of Catawba, you start hearing the legend of The Homeplace. The vivid imagery painted by fellow hikers (many of whom haven’t even been there) caused your mind to go single-track in the...

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Bill to preserve 400,000 acres in Colorado would be biggest deal in 25 years

Posted by on Apr 6, 2019 @ 6:58 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Bill to preserve 400,000 acres in Colorado would be biggest deal in 25 years

An ambitious effort to preserve mountain wilderness and historic landscapes in Colorado will launch April 8, 2019 with the introduction of a bill in Congress that aims to protect 400,000 acres of public lands in the state. It would pay special homage to Camp Hale, home to the historic 10th Mountain Division. The bill — dubbed the Colorado Outdoor Recreation & Economy Act — is spearheaded by U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet and U.S. Rep. Joe Neguse, both Democrats. “Public lands are really who we are in Colorado,” Neguse, who was recently elected...

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Five hikes in Colorado that are best done in the spring

Posted by on Apr 5, 2019 @ 8:42 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Five hikes in Colorado that are best done in the spring

As temperatures gradually warm up and flowers peek through the snow, Coloradans know what time of year has arrived. No, not springtime: hiking time. Snow-wary outdoorsmen are beginning to dig out their hiking boots again, ready to stretch their legs across the state’s many trails. But with all those options, it can sometimes be difficult to choose which trail to set out on, especially because of lingering snow. A new Colorado guidebook, “Base Camp Denver: 101 Hikes in Colorado’s Front Range”, comes out this month, and with it information on...

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Smokies Park Hosts Trail Volunteer Opportunities in April

Posted by on Apr 4, 2019 @ 7:26 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Smokies Park Hosts Trail Volunteer Opportunities in April

Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials announced several volunteer workdays during the month of April, 2019 on popular trails as the park prepares for the busy summer season. These opportunities are ideal for people interested in learning more about the park and the trails program through hands-on service alongside experienced park staff. Volunteers will help clear debris from trails and work to repair eroded trail sections. Workdays will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in North Carolina on April 6, April 20, April 22, and in...

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Here’s a closer look at what Trump cut out of Bears Ears National Monument

Posted by on Apr 3, 2019 @ 8:58 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Here’s a closer look at what Trump cut out of Bears Ears National Monument

When President Trump reduced the size of Utah’s Bears Ears National Monument by more than 1.1 million acres, his administration assured the public “important objects of scientific or historic interest” would still be protected. Many areas the Trump administration removed from Bears Ears are rich in uranium and oil deposits and may eventually become more accessible to developers. They had been off-limits under Barack Obama’s 2016 proclamation creating the monument. And many sites significant to the Native American governments that...

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North Carolina orders Duke Energy to excavate all coal ash

Posted by on Apr 2, 2019 @ 7:10 am in Conservation | 0 comments

North Carolina orders Duke Energy to excavate all coal ash

The country’s largest electric company was ordered to excavate coal ash from all of its North Carolina power plant sites, slashing the risk of toxic chemicals leaking into water supplies but potentially adding billions of dollars to the costs consumers pay. Duke Energy Corp. must remove the residue left after decades of burning coal to produce electricity, North Carolina’s environmental agency said. The company had proposed covering some storage pits with a waterproof cap, saying that would prevent rain from passing through and carrying...

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Yosemite is changing Half Dome hiking permits this year

Posted by on Apr 1, 2019 @ 9:48 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Yosemite is changing Half Dome hiking permits this year

The route up Half Dome that John Muir climbed in 1875 is the same one you’ll ascend today — if you’re lucky enough to score the special permit required to hike Yosemite’s most recognizable feature. After years of traffic jams on the cable-lined path up Half Dome — and several related deaths — the park put in place a permitting system in 2010. That eased the crowding somewhat, but in the intervening years, computer programmers essentially have rigged the online-permit system, making it exceedingly difficult for average tourists to land a...

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Springtime in the Great Smokies means synchronous firefly extravaganza is coming soon

Posted by on Mar 31, 2019 @ 7:51 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Springtime in the Great Smokies means synchronous firefly extravaganza is coming soon

Synchronous fireflies – the hottest ticket outside the flashing lights of Broadway – are about to get the party started. The chance to see Photinus carolinus, a firefly species whose males display synchronous flashes to attract mates, is so hotly anticipated and so rare, that the National Park Service had to limit the hordes of humans and now holds a lottery for tickets to the show. The lottery for vehicle passes will open at 9 a.m. April 26, 2019 and close at 8 p.m. April 29, said park spokeswoman Dana Soehn. But exactly when the flashy bugs...

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‘Doomsday vault’ threatened by climate change

Posted by on Mar 30, 2019 @ 7:37 am in Conservation | 0 comments

‘Doomsday vault’ threatened by climate change

The site of the so-called ‘Doomsday vault’, designed to safeguard millions of the world’s most genetically important seeds from nuclear war, asteroid strikes and other disasters, is at threat from climate change, a new report has warned. Longyearbyen, the Arctic home of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, faces potentially devastating avalanches, rockfalls, and floods over the coming decades as it warms faster than any other town on earth, according to the report Climate in Svalbard 2100. When the Svalbard Global Seed Vault was...

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Walking in Wales: New trail complete as final stage opens

Posted by on Mar 29, 2019 @ 6:41 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Walking in Wales: New trail complete as final stage opens

For more than 150 years, the Heart of Wales railway has meandered through some of the most breathtaking scenery in Britain. Now walkers can enjoy one of the UK’s longest fully-waymarked footpaths, loosely following the line, from Shropshire to Carmarthenshire. The last stage of the 141-mile trail opened this week. One tourism expert said Wales was “ideal” for such walking tourism due to its nature and heritage, and the predicted rise in visitor numbers is expected to provide a “major boost” to the local economy....

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National Park Week 2019: Celebrating America’s National Parks

Posted by on Mar 28, 2019 @ 6:40 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

National Park Week 2019: Celebrating America’s National Parks

National Park Week, running from April 20 through 28, 2019, has something for everyone. Join the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation for nine days of fun, including National Junior Ranger Day and National BARK Ranger Day. Visit www.NationalParkWeek.org for more information and a list of special events. “National parks are sources of inspiration, recreation, and education for everyone,” said National Park Service Deputy Director P. Daniel Smith. “During National Park Week, a wide variety of creative programs and events...

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Why Hiking Is Surging in Popularity in the U.S.

Posted by on Mar 27, 2019 @ 8:36 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Why Hiking Is Surging in Popularity in the U.S.

Hiking is now the fourth most-popular outdoor activity in the U.S., after running, fishing and biking, according to The Outdoor Foundation’s 2018 Outdoor Participation Report. The report noted that 44.9 million people hit the trails in 2017, up from 30 million in 2006. The biggest jump in participation came between 2015 and 2016. Trail experts say no definitive study has been conducted to determine why hiking has exploded in popularity over the last few years. But many do believe “Wild,” the Cheryl Strayed book about the...

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Smokies Park and Eastern Band Cherokee Indians Finalize Agreement Allowing Sochan Gathering

Posted by on Mar 26, 2019 @ 7:34 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Smokies Park and Eastern Band Cherokee Indians Finalize Agreement Allowing Sochan Gathering

Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians (EBCI) finalized a gathering agreement that allows the gathering of sochan (Rudbeckia laciniata) for traditional purposes by 36 permitted tribal members. Park Superintendent Cassius Cash and Principal Chief Richard Sneed were joined by tribal council members as they signed the historic agreement at the Oconaluftee Visitor Center on Monday, March 25, 2019. “The signing of this agreement allows both governments to strike a better balance in honoring the rich...

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Three decades after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, Alaska’s coast faces an even bigger threat

Posted by on Mar 25, 2019 @ 9:39 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Three decades after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, Alaska’s coast faces an even bigger threat

For three days in March 1989, the oil — at least 11 million gallons of it, though some say much more — had lain like a still pool around the ship, virtually untouched by cleanup efforts. Now the storm clawed the oil across the sound’s tracery of rocky islands, into their infinite crevices, and ultimately over more than 1,000 miles of rich coastal wilderness. The story isn’t over. Indeed, the tragedy of that coastal Alaska paradise is only deepening as it enters another, even darker act. Experts at the time said a comeback would take decades,...

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Linville Gorge: A Sparkle of Rekindled Joy

Posted by on Mar 24, 2019 @ 9:35 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Linville Gorge: A Sparkle of Rekindled Joy

That faraway gaze sprinkled with a sparkle of rekindled joy in his eyes was becoming more familiar these days as he reflected and reminisced of past memories – memories of a simpler time when laughter, friendship, and camaraderie was never in short supply, especially when in the presence of those who did life together – a family in a sense. That family consisted of Dad and his close friends whom he would take to his favorite camping spot – Linville Gorge. Life is a challenge and journey of its own, and sometimes a brief respite for the soul...

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The Cradle of Forestry in America historic site will begin the 2019 season on April 6

Posted by on Mar 23, 2019 @ 10:31 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

The Cradle of Forestry in America historic site will begin the 2019 season on April 6

The Cradle of Forestry’s living history demonstrators and crafters will bring the Pink Beds community along the Cradle’s Biltmore Campus Trail to life by re-creating an early 1900’s community busy at work and play. Guests can visit the cozy King House to smell the wonderful aromas of open-hearth cooking, help with laundry without the modern conveniences, talk with blacksmiths as they work their trade, visit Mr. Jenny in the old general store and enjoy traditional music and dancing. Visitors can find crafters including wood...

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New Verde Valley hiking trails show off views all the way to Flagstaff

Posted by on Mar 22, 2019 @ 9:19 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

New Verde Valley hiking trails show off views all the way to Flagstaff

Just a few miles north of Camp Verde, Arizona, Wet Beaver Creek cuts a meandering course through high-desert plains and sparse mesas on its way to the Verde River. For thousands of years, the perennially flowing stream has been the life blood for peoples who settled near its green corridor. The communities of Rimrock and Montezuma Lake are the most recent to evolve around the reliable water source. The tiny towns are a mix of ranch homes, antique shops, cafes and honey stands that sit at the hub of several important heritage sites off...

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Your shedding dog can help birds this spring

Posted by on Mar 21, 2019 @ 9:24 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Your shedding dog can help birds this spring

When birds start constructing their elaborate nests in spring, they look for all sorts of building materials. They search for twigs and leaves, moss and fluff, writes the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) and will look for various items wherever they can find them. You can help provide nesting material by either growing them in your yard or by making them easily accessible and, if you’re a dog owner, one fluffy material that can provide warmth and softness is dog hair. There are benefits to your four-legged friend’s furry...

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Hiking the Zen Path

Posted by on Mar 20, 2019 @ 9:23 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hiking the Zen Path

Long ago the Zen master Yunmen (864–949) purportedly admonished his disciples: “If you sit, just sit; if you walk, just walk—but don’t wobble.” It’s hard not to be scattered, especially in lives that are way too busy. Some of us may even wear our scurrying as a badge, as if it indicates that we’re important and doing impactful cutting-edge things in the world. When busyness becomes a virtue, we’re in deep trouble. Those of us caught up in frenetic living require strategies to guide us to an alternative. On a hike or a walk in a park, when you...

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The Rapid Decline Of The Natural World Is A Crisis Even Bigger Than Climate Change

Posted by on Mar 19, 2019 @ 7:01 am in Conservation | 0 comments

The Rapid Decline Of The Natural World Is A Crisis Even Bigger Than Climate Change

Nature is in freefall and the planet’s support systems are so stretched that we face widespread species extinctions and mass human migration unless urgent action is taken. That’s the warning hundreds of scientists are preparing to give, and it’s stark. The last year has seen a slew of brutal and terrifying warnings about the threat climate change poses to life. Far less talked about but just as dangerous, if not more so, is the rapid decline of the natural world. The felling of forests, the over-exploitation of seas and soils, and the...

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A Beginner’s Guide to the Compass

Posted by on Mar 18, 2019 @ 6:53 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

A Beginner’s Guide to the Compass

Whether you are out walking or cycling or simply driving somewhere new, being able to use a compass is an great skill that will always come in handy. Rather than just showing north, modern compasses have many features to assist in planning and navigation. Without a compass, you can still use your map by relying on visible features, but a compass allows you to be more accurate and navigate where there are few obvious landscape features. There are loads of magnetic compasses available, from those attached to penknives or whistles, to huge,...

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Hiking 630 miles of English coast, with nothing left to lose

Posted by on Mar 17, 2019 @ 9:20 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hiking 630 miles of English coast, with nothing left to lose

Raynor Winn’s life as she knew it turned an abrupt corner in 2013. She and her husband Moth lost the home they raised their children in, a small farm that was also their livelihood. The next day, Moth was diagnosed with corticobasal degeneration, a rare degenerative brain disease with no treatment aside from pain management. The doctor estimated he had only up to two years left. For the first time in decades, they had nowhere to go and nowhere to be, and they had no idea how much time they had left together. So they started walking....

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Woman’s Solo Hiking Trip Shockingly Doesn’t Have To Do With Inner Journey Or Anything

Posted by on Mar 16, 2019 @ 11:10 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Woman’s Solo Hiking Trip Shockingly Doesn’t Have To Do With Inner Journey Or Anything

Confusing her friends and colleagues as to what could possibly drive her to undertake such an expedition, sources confirmed that aspiring explorer Jillian Greene’s solo hike through Yosemite National Park has evidently nothing to do with soul-searching, an inner journey, or any other form of self-discovery. “Naturally, I assumed she was attempting to deal with a catastrophic event, the loss of a parent, or a devastating breakup or something similar. But no, Jillian is really just using her vacation time to be out in nature, just walking for...

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This Phoenix hike shows how water carves up the desert

Posted by on Mar 15, 2019 @ 9:02 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

This Phoenix hike shows how water carves up the desert

For Arizonans especially, the fear of running water should rank right up there with snakes and heights. Although storm water raging through usually-dry channels solicits choirs of oohs and ahhs, the flows are definitely not something to mess with. If the human brain has a “dangerous things archive,” an image of a roaring desert wash ought to be seared into it. They can go from trickle to torrent in minutes. Driving, riding or hiking through them is extremely risky and potentially deadly. Need more evidence? Next time you’re hiking by a creek...

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Resupplying and Accessing Towns Along the Appalachian Trail

Posted by on Mar 14, 2019 @ 9:44 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Resupplying and Accessing Towns Along the Appalachian Trail

Resupplying on the Appalachian Trail is easier then you might think. While the heart of the AT takes you through the Appalachian mountains and there are certainly remote parts of the trail, it also takes you within practical distances from dozens of towns and communities along the way. The AT takes hikers within reach of a town every three to seven days on average. These towns naturally serve as useful resupply points for tangible goods such as food and gear, but they are also helpful for restoring your physical energy and mental fortitude....

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President Signs Bill Permanently Reauthorizing Land and Water Conservation Fund

Posted by on Mar 13, 2019 @ 7:26 am in Conservation | 0 comments

President Signs Bill Permanently Reauthorizing Land and Water Conservation Fund

In an historic victory for public lands and close to home recreation, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was permanently reauthorized on March 12, 2019 as part of a sweeping public lands package signed into law by the president. The legislation, which passed with overwhelming bipartisan support in the House (363-62) and the Senate (92-8) last month, was signed during a ceremony that included LWCF champions. This is the culmination of a years-long effort by Congressional champions on both sides of the aisle and by stakeholders across...

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How to Finance a Pacific Crest Trail Thru-Hike

Posted by on Mar 12, 2019 @ 9:35 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

How to Finance a Pacific Crest Trail Thru-Hike

One of life’s biggest stressors—both on and off the trail—is money. Don’t bring that stress with you during a thru-hike, or at least try to minimize the impact. Running out of money will end your adventure. This most frequently asked question is also one of the hardest to answer. Running out of money is one of the leading reasons people cite for not completing the trail. But how much a thru-hike costs is hugely dependent on the choices you make both before and during your hike. Gear choices, transportation to the trail, lodging options, and...

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Nearly $675 Million Spent On Deferred Park Maintenance, Yet Backlog Still Nearly $12 Billion

Posted by on Mar 11, 2019 @ 9:45 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Nearly $675 Million Spent On Deferred Park Maintenance, Yet Backlog Still Nearly $12 Billion

Proof of the challenge the National Park Service faces in trying to catch up with deferred maintenance across the National Park System can be found in the agency’s latest report on the matter: Nearly $700 million was spent during Fiscal 2018 on maintenance projects, yet the backlog still is nearly $12 billion. Congress had a chance last year to give the Park Service a big lift by passing legislation that would have provided $6.5 billion over five years specifically for maintenance needs. But the measure died near the end of the 115th...

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Is the border actually lawless? This father and son are hiking all 1,954 miles to find out.

Posted by on Mar 10, 2019 @ 9:34 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Nearly 2,000 miles of hot, dry and mostly inhospitable terrain, the United States’ border with Mexico is not a top tourism destination. It is a landscape in which one is more likely to find people who are compelled to be there: immigrants crossing into the United States illegally; growing numbers of Border Patrol agents assigned to police and secure the area; vigilantes hoping to stanch the flow of illegal migration; and activists working to support it. Paul and Nick Pineda, a father and son duo from the Seattle area, have set their sights on...

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In the path of the Gods: Hiking South Korea’s tallest mountain

Posted by on Mar 9, 2019 @ 8:32 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

In the path of the Gods: Hiking South Korea’s tallest mountain

Thousands of years ago, the spirits of a beautiful mountain towering over a deserted island created three male demi-gods. These holy men spotted a ship approaching the island while climbing the mountain. On it were three princesses sent by a master of a foreign kingdom. They married the three demigods and founded their own empire at the bottom of the mountain widely known as Mount Hallasan. This is how legend describes the origins of Jeju, an island off the southern coast of the Korean peninsula which draws tourists from all over East Asia....

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