News

Near Qingdao, Hiking a Magical Mountain

Posted by on Aug 22, 2013 @ 4:00 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Laoshan Scenic District is an easy drive along the east coast of China from the city of Qingdao, 19 miles or so to the west. About two million visitors come each year to ascend Laoshan’s peaks, which are strewed with oddly shaped moraines resembling stacks of books and curving horns. Around the mountain’s pale stones, cedar, elm and pine sprout in lush green tufts, fed by rainfall-charged aquifers deep underground. The water filters through the strata and then courses up from crevices in the granite before collecting in clear, azure pools...

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Unlocking the mystery of Graveyard Fields

Posted by on Aug 21, 2013 @ 5:24 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

While lines of cars zip down the Blue Ridge Parkway and hikers scurry along its zigzagging trails, Graveyard Fields moves at its own pace. The high elevation meadows of Graveyard Fields are a crowned jewel of the Shining Rock Wilderness in Western North Carolina. No trees means great views — views without scrambling up a mountain peak or peering out from intermittent windows in the tree canopy. Graveyard Fields is a hiking experience more common to the Rockies where the combination of cold and elevation keep the treeline at bay. Here in the...

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PEEC Launches Hiking Los Alamos 102 Series

Posted by on Aug 21, 2013 @ 11:40 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

PEEC Launches Hiking Los Alamos 102 Series

Los Alamos, NM is surrounded by beautiful hiking trails, but not everyone may feel comfortable exploring them on their own. For that reason, the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC) in collaboration with the County Recreation Department, held a summer series, Hiking Los Alamos 101, which aimed to make Los Alamos residents and visitors comfortable and confident about hiking on Los Alamos’s trails. The series was wildly popular, prompting the two organizations to plan a similar series for the fall. Hiking Los Alamos 102 will begin...

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Chugach Children’s Forest – Get Out. Go Wild. Change the Future.

Posted by on Aug 21, 2013 @ 8:32 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Chugach Children’s Forest – Get Out. Go Wild. Change the Future.

The Chugach Children’s Forest is a partnership led by Alaska Geographic and the USDA Forest Service. A symbolic designation for the entire Chugach National Forest, the Chugach Children’s Forest creates exciting opportunities for Alaska’s youth and communities to connect with the magnificent Chugach National Forest and neighboring public lands. The Chugach National Forest is a vast and inspiring mix of glaciers, mountains, rainforest, and wild coastline—and backyard to half of Alaska’s population. People come from all over the world to...

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Yellowstone National Park 1988: A 25th Anniversary Retrospective of Black Saturday

Posted by on Aug 20, 2013 @ 3:24 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Today marks the 25th anniversary of Black Saturday, the most significant single day of fire growth to occur during the 1988 Yellowstone fires. The 1988 Yellowstone fires were also the most significant fires to ever occur in a national park, and an event that would in many ways transform fire management throughout the country. The fire season at Yellowstone that season started out to be fairly typical for that period of time. Over the previous 16 years, Yellowstone had allowed 235 fires to burn under its natural fire policy, and only 15 of...

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World’s biggest, baddest national parks

Posted by on Aug 20, 2013 @ 8:07 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

What do you imagine when you hear the word “wilderness?” Odds are your vision involves pristine rivers and lakes, untouched swaths of land and the possibility to go for weeks or months on end without seeing another living soul (but plenty of wildlife, of course). While there are numerous incredible protected areas around the globe, size matters when it comes to getting away from it all. This is why we decided to take a look at the biggest, baddest national parks on the planet. These are the places where you can truly escape and...

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Cincinnati Health Foundation to announce grants for hiking and biking trails

Posted by on Aug 19, 2013 @ 5:03 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Interact for Health of Greater Cincinnati will announce two grants that could help connect hike and bike trails throughout the region. Green Umbrella is to be presented with a $70,000 check to develop a master plan to connect existing bicycle and walking trails throughout Greater Cincinnati. It’s hoped such a network will spur economic development, increase property values and promote active living. Groundwork Cincinnati is to be awarded $80,000 to expand a hike-and-bike trail along the Mill Creek. The Mill Creek Greenway Trail is expected to...

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Forest Service offers Tips for Fall Foliage Fun in the Mountains of WNC

Posted by on Aug 19, 2013 @ 4:35 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The U.S. Forest Service National Forests in North Carolina today unveiled its fall foliage 2013 webpage, featuring scenic drives and others areas in the Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests to enjoy leaf viewing this autumn. With more than a month before the fall foliage season begins, the feature will help visitors plan their fall adventures. The feature is posted on the National Forests in North Carolina website, http://www.fs.usda.gov/nfsnc. “Fall Foliage in Western North Carolina – 2013” describes popular locations for...

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Record rainfall may dampen fall color show, says WCU’s foliage forecaster

Posted by on Aug 19, 2013 @ 7:30 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Abundant rainfall during one of the wettest summers in Western North Carolina history may portend a dampening of the intensity of the fall color show this year unless autumn brings vastly drier conditions, predicts Kathy Mathews, Western Carolina University’s fearless fall foliage forecaster. “With record rainfall during July, the trees in the mountains look healthy and green at the moment, and that’s a good thing for the trees,” said Mathews. “But leaf-lookers need to keep their fingers crossed for some drier weather in the next couple of...

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Hiking reveals subtle charm of Bull Creek Wildlife Management Area

Posted by on Aug 18, 2013 @ 8:13 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hiking reveals subtle charm of Bull Creek Wildlife Management Area

There was nothing subtle about the change a dozen hikers stepped into from shady pinewoods to open palmetto prairie in the Bull Creek Wildlife Management Area about 15 miles west of West Melbourne. On a recent trek guided by Tony Flohre of the Indian River chapter of the Florida Trail Association, the group was able to enjoy the beauty of the area’s two dominant ecosystems without overheating because of an early morning start — and clouds. But while pines and palmetto offered wildly different scenes, Flohre — who has led such hikes for almost...

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The Portable Percussionist: Long Trail concert tour

Posted by on Aug 18, 2013 @ 12:08 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Vermont percussionist Jane Boxall will spend September and part of October hiking the Long Trail – all 272 miles between the Canadian and Massachusetts borders – and playing drum sessions along the way. She’ll stop off and give solo concerts/clinics, for “portable” percussion. That means found objects, bits of wood, stones, ceramic flowerpots, etc. The Long Trail is a hiking trail located in Vermont, running the length of the state. It is the oldest long-distance trail in the United States, constructed between 1912 and 1930 by the Green...

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The 10 Most Dangerous Hikes

Posted by on Aug 17, 2013 @ 8:30 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Talk to most mountaineers, trail runners, or mountain bikers, and they’ll tell you that hiking is the weak sibling of adventurous outdoor sports. A little too slow, a little too granola, not enough adrenaline. But that’s not always the case—some of the most dangerous adventures in the world involve simply putting one foot in front of the other. Exposure, wild animals, guerrilla fighters, heat, bugs, crumbling trails—these are just some of the variables that can turn a walk in the woods or through the mountains into a flirt with death. Here...

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TAAN to explore new trekking trails in Mahabharat Range

Posted by on Aug 16, 2013 @ 6:08 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

TAAN to explore new trekking trails in Mahabharat Range

The Trekking Agencies Association of Nepal (TAAN) is exploring new trekking trails in the Mahabharat Range. A 15-member team of the association will leave for Kavre on August 19 to explore Timal area of Kavre and the Mahabharat Range. Along with TAAN officials and trekking entrepreneurs, the team will include a videographer, photographer, cartographer and report writer. According to Ambar Tamang, 2nd vice president of TAAN, the team will explore two trekking trails – The Great Buddhist Masters Trail and Mahabharat Rhododendron Trail....

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Eight-mile trail opens at Big Bear Lake, first in two decades

Posted by on Aug 16, 2013 @ 5:52 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Eight-mile trail opens at Big Bear Lake, first in two decades

Hikers and bikers take note: Touted as the first new trail in Big Bear (northeast of Los Angeles) in 20 years, a new eight-mile single track opens Saturday, August 17. Located on the backside of Snow Summit, the new Skyline Trail is designed to become the backbone of a new south shore trails system. When completed, it will be part of a 15-mile loop with views of Mt. San Gorgonio. The trail can either be accessed by driving a car or riding a bike to U.S. Forest Service Road 2N10. Take Moonridge Road to Clubview Drive. Stay on Clubview Drive...

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Hiking in the Black Canyon of the Gunnison: Curecanti Creek Trail at Pioneer Point

Posted by on Aug 16, 2013 @ 7:29 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

One of the best ways to hike from the rim to the river at the Black Canyon of the Gunnison is the Curecanti Creek Trail at Pioneer Point. While there are easier and shorter ways to the water, if you want to hike rim to river, the Curecanti Creek Trail drops 900 feet in two miles AND it ends with a view of one of the canyon’s features, the Curecanti Needle, a rock formation featured on the logo for the scenic railroad that went through part of the canyon. The Black Canyon stretches 48 miles between Gunnison and Montrose. Part of the...

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New recreation map details Cherokee National Forest

Posted by on Aug 15, 2013 @ 6:28 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

A new recreation map for the Cherokee National Forest is now widely available to the public. At 650,000 acres, the Cherokee National Forest covers more of East Tennessee than the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The “Cherokee National Forest Adventure Map” takes this 10-county mountain region and highlights the natural and recreation features most likely to appeal to families and first-time visitors. Sites at the southern end of the national forest include Bald River Falls, the Cherohala Skyway, Hiwassee River gorge, and the Ocoee...

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South Carolina Upstate hiking trails closed

Posted by on Aug 15, 2013 @ 6:22 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Caesars Head and Jones Gap State Park have closed all or parts of several trails. Rangers are working to clear debris and reroute high water. TRAIL CLOSURES: Please see the following list for closures: Raven Cliff Suspension Bridge – Open route of Gum Gap to Naturaland, the rest of Naturaland closed Cold Spring – Trail closed until water recedes. Dismal Loop – Trail closed. Rim of the Gap from Frank Coggins to John Sloan – Trail closed until water recedes. Pinnacle Pass – Closed Raven Cliff overlook, Mountain...

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Hiking with Chimps in Uganda

Posted by on Aug 14, 2013 @ 8:14 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

One of the best places in Africa to hang with our closest relatives is Uganda’s Kibale Forest National Park, home to more than 1,400 chimpanzees and the continent’s highest diversity and density of primates. Most safari travelers opt for one of the twice-daily, ranger-guided, three-hour chimpanzee hikes. But as rewarding as this experience is, you are limited to spending just one hour with the primates once the guide locates them to avoid provoking stress or transmitting human-borne diseases. To help travelers learn more, and to...

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Pedro Point Headlands Workday and Native Plant Hike

Posted by on Aug 14, 2013 @ 9:13 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Pedro Point Headlands Workday and Native Plant Hike

There are two opportunities in August to enjoy, give back, and learn about the Pedro Point Headlands and all are welcome. There will be a Habitat Restoration workday and/or a Native Plant hike on Sunday, Aug. 25, for anyone up for hiking and working on the rugged steep hilled property with spectacular vistas and breathtaking incline and declines. To pitch in and help restore habitat on Aug. 25, meet at the Pedro Point Firehouse on Danmann Avenue in Pedro Point District at 9:45 a.m. You will collect seeds, remove french broom and invasives and...

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Thoughts on recent JMT and PCT speed records

Posted by on Aug 13, 2013 @ 5:47 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Andrew Skurka is an accomplished adventure athlete, speaker, guide, and writer. The 31-year-old is most well known for his solo long-distance backpacking trips, notably the 4,700-mile 6-month Alaska-Yukon Expedition, the 6,875-mile 7-month Great Western Loop, and the 7,775-mile 11-month Sea-to-Sea Route. New Fastest Known Times (FKT’s) were recently set on both the John Muir Trail (JMT) and Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). The PCT record has been especially big news within and beyond the hiking community. On the JMT, ultra runners Hal Koerner and...

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Mount Fuji, So Popular It Hurts

Posted by on Aug 13, 2013 @ 11:46 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The words printed on the buses that drive through Kawaguchiko, a scenic town in the foothills of Japan’s tallest and most sacred mountain, were as reassuring as they were disconcerting: “Preserve the Nature of Mt. Fuji.” The message was a reminder that despite years of effort, the millions who visit the mountain and nearby towns each year and the plethora of businesses that serve them continue to have a profound impact on the environment, whether through mounting trash, poor air quality or suburban sprawl. Mount Fuji, or Fujisan as it’s known...

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Earn college credit for hiking Appalachian Trail

Posted by on Aug 12, 2013 @ 5:12 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Earn college credit for hiking Appalachian Trail

Kasi Quinn did it. So did J.B. “Jason” Hibbitts. They thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail. Both also came back to Emory, Va., and reported on their hikes – even earning college credit – through a program called Semester-A-Trail at Emory & Henry College. Jim Harrison, the college’s director of outdoor programming, calls this “a special studies opportunity that allows degree-seeking students to attempt a thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail while remaining fully enrolled in an academic semester.” Harrison...

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Gordons Pond Trail trekking toward start

Posted by on Aug 12, 2013 @ 4:53 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Gordons Pond Trail project will create 2.7 miles of improved trail connecting Gordons Pond to Herring Point in Cape Henlopen State Park, Delaware. The Junction & Breakwater Trail and Gordons Pond Trail will be linked, becoming a major segment of a 15.5-mile loop forming a regional trail system connecting Rehoboth Beach and Lewes. The trail is aligned and designed to protect rare plant and animal species and archaeological sites from wayward bikers and hikers, with a 900-foot boardwalk-bridge spanning an environmentally sensitive...

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A major Maine — and national — mystery

Posted by on Aug 11, 2013 @ 10:24 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Geraldine Largay, 66, an experienced hiker on the Appalachian Trail, left the Poplar Ridge Lean-to shelter near Rangeley, Maine on Monday, July 22, a beautiful, sunny day. She checked in with her husband via text message as she headed toward the Spaulding Mountain Lean-to, eight miles north. She had already hiked from Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, almost 1000 miles, with her final destination the AT terminus at Katahdin. Three young men hiking south on the trail remembered seeing her that afternoon near Lone Mountain, about three miles from...

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Breaking the cycle of poverty starts on the Appalachian Trail

Posted by on Aug 11, 2013 @ 9:29 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Breaking the cycle of poverty starts on the Appalachian Trail

Cierra Schell, an incoming junior at Philadelphia’s High School of the Future, finished her ninth day of backpacking limping down the Appalachian Trail. She was in misery but so proud of it. “This is ridiculous,” she said. “I feel dirty. My feet got blisters all over. But it was worth it. I reached my breaking point yesterday. I fell. I didn’t want to get up, but I did it for my team. So we could reach camp and get some sleep… I felt I couldn’t go on, but I pushed myself, and I made it.” This...

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Your Own Private Idaho

Posted by on Aug 10, 2013 @ 10:21 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The “Entering Stanley, Idaho” sign seems more like a friendly warning than a welcome. “Population 63,” it reads, as if to say: Congratulations, you’ve made it to the middle of nowhere. Stanley is the entry point to the Sawtooth Valley, a time warp of a place with four saloons, five mountain ranges and not much else. Established by Congress in 1972 and managed by the federal Forest Service, the 756,000-acre Sawtooth National Recreation Area, which includes the 217,000-acre Sawtooth Wilderness, is arguably more rugged and wild than any national...

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Hikers adding Prince Edward Island to International Appalachian Trail

Posted by on Aug 9, 2013 @ 8:17 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Ed Talone started his hiking journey from Key West, Fla., in 2011. Nine months and 6,500 kilometres later, he landed in Bangor, Me. At the same time, Julie King was doing some hiking through the International Appalachian Trail. Their paths crossed and the rest is history. “The hike started as a continuation, we left from Baxter Park and so far we’ve hiked over 2,100 km,” said King. The International Appalachian Trail runs from the northern terminus of the Appalachian Trail at Mount Katahdin, Maine, through New Brunswick, parts of Quebec and...

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Close-up Mount St. Helens crater view is worth the hike

Posted by on Aug 9, 2013 @ 3:45 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

The final few yards of climbing to the crater view are the toughest, with hikers digging their boots into soft sandy pumice, taking care not to dislodge rocks. But the view is worth the sweat-inducing slog. The route — which is scheduled to open to the public next year — leads to a spectacular view into the crater of Mount St. Helens. The scenery includes the heavily crevassed Crater Glacier, which flows around the lava dome, and rockfalls that tumble off the crater walls and send up angry plumes of dust. Lindsey Karr, a guide with the Mount...

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WNC hiker Matt Kirk breaks AT unsupported record

Posted by on Aug 9, 2013 @ 2:40 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

WNC hiker Matt Kirk breaks AT unsupported record

Perhaps you were out hiking the Appalachian Trail this summer and thought you saw something really tall and skinny whiz by – it most likely wasn’t a misplaced giraffe. Chances are it was Matt Kirk, who on Wednesday night, August 7, broke the unsupported speed record for a thru-hike of the AT. What that means, exactly, is that Kirk, 32, a schoolteacher who most recently was living in Western North Carolina with his wife, Lily, is the fastest human to hike the 2,185-mile-long Appalachian Trail, without assistance. He carried all his own food...

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National Park Service offers free admission on 97th birthday, Aug. 25

Posted by on Aug 9, 2013 @ 7:25 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Admission will be free to America’s national parks on Sunday, Aug. 25, in honor of the 97th anniversary of the National Park Service. Special festivities will take place at parks coast to coast. “National parks belong to all Americans, and we invite everyone to join us and celebrate this special day,” said National Park Service director Jonathan B. Jarvis, in a statement. “From kite-building demonstrations at Wright Brothers National Memorial, to a river paddle at New River Gorge National River or a scenic railroad ride at Steamtown...

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Pacific Crest Trail taking a beating from vegan hikers

Posted by on Aug 8, 2013 @ 8:50 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Barring a broken leg, lightning strike or some other catastrophe, a 30-year-old California man is on track to set a record today by completing a supported through-hike of the 2,655-mile Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to Canada in just 59 days. Josh Garrett has averaged 44 miles a day since leaving the Mexico border on June 10, and about 50 miles a day through Oregon and Washington with at least one daily mileage of more than 70 miles. GPS data indicates he hiked 48 miles on Monday, getting within roughly 150 miles of the U.S-Canada border....

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How to pack food for long backpacking trips

Posted by on Aug 8, 2013 @ 9:54 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

On multi-day trips, the weight and bulk of food becomes significant, especially as your appetite rises, usually after a couple of weeks. This means that calorie-rich, dense dried foods are best. Long distance hikers are the ones in supermarkets searching out the highest calorie foods. Careful selection and a few additions can make dried meals quite tasty. Overall, around one kilo of food a day provides plenty of energy – about 3,500-4,000 calories – for trips of one to three weeks. On longer trips you may need 4-5,000 calories a day and so up...

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Biking and hiking made easy at Whistler

Posted by on Aug 8, 2013 @ 8:59 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Summertime, and the biking and hiking are easy at Whistler. The British Columbia resort, known for its world-class skiing, has also turned itself into a popular summer resort. Visitors can ride lifts that swoop up to more than 7,000 feet, giving spectacular mountain views and easy access to high-country hiking trails. Down in the valley, the 24-mile paved Valley Trail (for bicyclists, walkers, joggers and roller-bladers) makes for easygoing pedaling through parkland and forests, along a string of small lakes, and past envy-inducing vacation...

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Popular White Mountain National Forest trail closing for repairs

Posted by on Aug 7, 2013 @ 5:03 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

One of the most heavily used entrance trails at the Southwest corner of the White Mountain National Forest is closing on weekdays for extensive repairs. Colleen Mainville, spokesman for the forest, said the 2.9-mile Lincoln Woods Trail will close due to the damage caused by Tropical Storm Irene in 2011. The trail is a main route into the headwaters of the East Branch of the Pemigewasset River and leads into one of the largest roadless areas in the eastern United States known as the Pemigewasset Wilderness. Mainville said she is hopeful the...

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