News

7 of the Best Hiking Trails in New Jersey

Posted by on May 22, 2017 @ 11:45 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

7 of the Best Hiking Trails in New Jersey

For Dawn L. McClennen, there’s nothing like the feeling of being outside with just a pair of hiking shoes and a backpack. “You’re away from technology, out in the fresh air,” McClennen said. “There’s this sense of adventure. You’re exploring sights you haven’t seen before.” McClennen, 47, has been hiking for a little more than 20 years. She is the co-founder of NJHiking.com, a website dedicated to New Jersey’s large hiking scene that she created with her husband eight years ago. She...

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How far can an electric vehicle take you?

Posted by on May 22, 2017 @ 7:10 am in Conservation | 0 comments

How far can an electric vehicle take you?

There is no single answer — it depends on your choice of EV. Today, there are now a growing number of diverse EVs on the market. Battery electric vehicles run exclusively on electricity via batteries (often referred to as BEVs or just EVs). Plug-in electric vehicles (PHEVs) combine an electric motor and an internal combustion engine (gasoline engine), and the electric motor can be recharged by plugging the vehicle into an electrical outlet. Battery technology is the key to EV range (how far the vehicle can travel on a charge). Most EVs today...

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The Top Four Hiking Trails Of South Florida

Posted by on May 21, 2017 @ 7:03 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

The Top Four Hiking Trails Of South Florida

For many people, the ideal Florida vacation includes beach, sun, sand and a cold beverage. While the beaches of South Florida are certainly some of the best in the world, there is much more to the region than beaches, theme parks and crocodiles. Hiking in Florida might not be touted as the main tourist option, but if you get tired of sunbathing and Disney World isn’t something that you enjoy, consider one of these top hikes in South Florida. Before you head out, however, there are a few things that you need to take into account to be best...

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Vail Nature Center expands hiking schedule

Posted by on May 20, 2017 @ 11:48 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Vail Nature Center expands hiking schedule

Walking Mountains Science Center and the Vail Recreation District’s hiking schedule kicks off in June 2017 with added trails, more peaks and learning on public lands. The Backcountry Hiking program, centered out of the Vail Nature Center in Vail, Colorado, runs from the beginning of June through the end of October, catching the summer wildflower blooms along with peak fall color season. To view the full schedule and register, visit Walking Mountains Science Center. Hikes are guided by certified interpretive guides, wilderness first...

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Cradle of Forestry Offers Walks to Beaver Wetland

Posted by on May 20, 2017 @ 7:24 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Cradle of Forestry Offers Walks to Beaver Wetland

The Cradle of Forestry invites the public to a program, “Bogs, Bugs and Beavers,” on Saturday, May 27, 2017. The program begins in the Forest Discovery Center at 10:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. with an introduction about beavers’ adaptations to living in a watery world. Then naturalists will lead walks to elevated boardwalks along the Pink Beds Trail, interpreting the beavers’ wetland creating activities, the changing habitats they create, and the woods and water along the way. Each program lasts about 1.5 hours with a...

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Smokies Park Reminds Visitors to be Bear Aware

Posted by on May 19, 2017 @ 12:37 pm in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Smokies Park Reminds Visitors to be Bear Aware

As the busy summer season approaches, Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials want to remind visitors about precautions they can take while enjoying the park to keep themselves and bears safe. Bears are particularly active this time of year in search for spring foods. Visitors should be prepared in how to safely observe bears without disturbing them during this critical season. “Bears are very active right now, and we’re receiving reports across the park of bear sightings along trails and roadways,” said Park Wildlife Biologist Bill...

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American Trees Are Moving West, and No One Knows Why

Posted by on May 19, 2017 @ 6:41 am in Conservation | 0 comments

American Trees Are Moving West, and No One Knows Why

As the consequences of climate change strike across the United States, ecologists have a guiding principle about how they think plants will respond. Cold-adapted plants will survive if they move “up”—that is, as they move further north (away from the tropics) and higher in elevation (away from the warm ground). A new survey of how tree populations have shifted over the past three decades finds that this effect is already in action. But there’s a twist: Even more than moving poleward, trees are moving west. About three-quarters of tree species...

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Celebrate hiking on National Trails Day June 3, 2017

Posted by on May 18, 2017 @ 12:23 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Celebrate hiking on National Trails Day June 3, 2017

The New York-New Jersey Trail Conference and REI invite nature lovers and adventure seekers to an open house at trail conference headquarters on Saturday, June 3, in celebration of National Trails Day. The event includes tours of the headquarters at Darlington Schoolhouse, guided hikes through Ramapo Valley County Reservation, and stewardship opportunities to help make a difference at this popular park. National Trails Day is an event held across the country recognizing the power trails have in connecting people with nature. In partnership...

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Author publishes a beginner’s guide to mindful hiking in Sonoma County

Posted by on May 18, 2017 @ 7:14 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Author publishes a beginner’s guide to mindful hiking in Sonoma County

Paula Phillips Marks was almost 50 when she took her first real hike, and she remembers it vividly. A friend took her on what was supposed to be a short stroll in Annadel State Park. They didn’t have a map and got lost. Seven hours and 11 miles later they limped back to the car. For many, a first hike of this sort might also have been their last, but not for Marks, who glimpsed what was to become a ruling passion in her life. She signed up for a beginning hiking class at Santa Rosa Junior College, known as The Walking Class, and after the...

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Harmon Den Timber Harvesting Project Resumes

Posted by on May 17, 2017 @ 11:56 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Harmon Den Timber Harvesting Project Resumes

The USFS has resumed a project that includes timber harvesting in the Harmon Den area of the Appalachian Ranger District of the Pisgah National Forest, approximately 25 miles northwest of Asheville, North Carolina. Benefits of the timber harvesting include improved wildlife habitat for species including elk, deer, grouse and other species that benefit from areas of young forest in which sunlight reaches the forest floor. Harvesting is taking place pursuant to the Harmon Den Project Decision Notice that was signed by the District Ranger in...

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Smokey Bear gets a major makeover thanks to SC entrepreneur, artist

Posted by on May 17, 2017 @ 7:23 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Smokey Bear gets a major makeover thanks to SC entrepreneur, artist

Clad in his signature park ranger hat, belt buckle, and jeans, Smokey Bear is best known for his timeless message: “Only you can prevent wildfires.” Created by the U.S. Forest Service, National Association of State Foresters, and Ad Council, the character is considered the longest-running public service campaign in American history, and one of the most successful. But Greenville, SC’s Matt Moreau and Cory Godbey are giving the beloved bear a makeover. Moreau is the owner of Dapper Ink Custom Outfitters, which produces screen-printed...

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South Pacific Island Uninhabited For 600 Years Is Drowning In Plastic

Posted by on May 17, 2017 @ 6:37 am in Conservation | 0 comments

South Pacific Island Uninhabited For 600 Years Is Drowning In Plastic

There truly is no Earthly escape from the waste we have unleashed into the environment. Henderson Island in the South Pacific has been found to host hundreds of pieces of plastic per square meter of beach, with even more items buried in the sand. World heritage site Henderson Island is among the most remote places on Earth. Although Polynesians once occupied the island, it has been uninhabited for at least 600 years. Moreover, the nearest inhabited island is Pitcairn, 120 miles away with a population of just 56. When it comes to major...

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Cradle of Forestry Invites Nature Enthusiasts to Pink Beds Bioblitz

Posted by on May 16, 2017 @ 11:31 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Cradle of Forestry Invites Nature Enthusiasts to Pink Beds Bioblitz

The Cradle of Forestry in America invites nature enthusiasts of all ages and knowledge levels to the first spring Pink Beds Bioblitz on Saturday, May 20, 2017. Join naturalists and scientists to discover the diversity of life in this special part of Pisgah National Forest, and add to knowledge gained about the area during last fall’s Bioblitz. Those who would like to participate should register that morning at the Pink Beds Picnic Area from 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. There, they will split into planned zones along the Pink Beds Trail and...

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Freshwater’s Macro Microplastic Problem

Posted by on May 16, 2017 @ 6:38 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Freshwater’s Macro Microplastic Problem

In the winter of 2014, Sherri “Sam” Mason, a chemist at the State University of New York at Fredonia, sent two of her undergraduate students out to the shore of Lake Erie near campus to volunteer to fillet the fish that sport fisherman caught. The deal: the students could keep the guts. They took the fish innards back to campus and painstakingly sorted through the contents. They were hunting for tiny particles of plastic that Mason and other researchers have shown are abundant in the waters of the Great Lakes. They didn’t have to look hard....

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6 ways to get the best workout while hiking

Posted by on May 15, 2017 @ 9:00 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

6 ways to get the best workout while hiking

Modern workout machines, like treadmills, offer flat and predictable workout surfaces. Although you can adjust the incline slightly, it does not offer a consistent challenge. In fact, most people fail to see expected results after months of using their treadmill. Hiking engages the entire body as it requires the use of hamstrings, glutes, quadriceps, abdominals, calves, thighs and lower-back, as you navigate the terrain as well as whatever obstacles you may encounter. Every log you climb over during a hike will challenge you in a way...

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Oregon club using hand tools to clear wilderness trail

Posted by on May 15, 2017 @ 6:59 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Oregon club using hand tools to clear wilderness trail

The sharp teeth of the cross-cut saw carve like a file through the thick fir log to the rhythm of Jason Middleton and Aaron Babcock pushing and pulling this antique tool of the backwoods. “We’d already be through it but we hit a knot,” Babcock says. The knot proves to be no match for the seasoned saw, and the split log sloughs into the Middle Fork Trail, where Gabe Howe joins the men in hauling the log away to make way on the trail. That’s 1 down, 14,999 to go. Babcock, Howe and other members of the Siskiyou Mountain...

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Officials stress preparation for hikers, warn of tricky trail conditions

Posted by on May 14, 2017 @ 11:22 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Officials stress preparation for hikers, warn of tricky trail conditions

Law enforcement and search and rescue personnel encourage adventurers to plan ahead, use the buddy system and tell loved ones where they’re headed as they venture into the Columbia River Gorge or the Northwest’s other wonders as the weather warms. Trails can be tricky this time of year, a Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office spokesman said, citing slick and snowy conditions, as well as erosion caused by a wet season thus far. Outdoor enthusiasts should keep watch for things like slippery rocks, downed trees, rockslides and...

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For Palestinian Hikers In West Bank, A Chance To Enjoy Nature And Escape Tensions

Posted by on May 14, 2017 @ 8:17 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

For Palestinian Hikers In West Bank, A Chance To Enjoy Nature And Escape Tensions

The hikers pile out of minivans on the side of a serpentine highway, climb a dusty hill, pass a Bedouin woman preparing morning bread in a tent, then turn the corner and find themselves embraced by the desert hills — a world apart. Outdoor exploration is a weekly Friday morning ritual for the group, which calls itself Shat’ha, or “Picnic” in Arabic – one of scores of informal Palestinian hiking groups that have sprung up in recent years. Their home, the West Bank, is a hikers’ paradise: mountains shimmering with olive...

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Navigating the Ups and Downs While Hiking the Condor Trail

Posted by on May 13, 2017 @ 12:17 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Navigating the Ups and Downs While Hiking the Condor Trail

The Condor Trail is a wilderness route through the mountains in the Santa Barbara, California backcountry running more than 400 miles from Lake Piru in the south to Bottcher’s Gap in the mountains above Big Sur near Carmel. It goes through seven wilderness areas in the Los Padres National Forest. It is not an easy trail — in parts, there is no trail. Inspired by trails like the Appalachian Trail, the John Muir Trail and the PCT, the Condor Trail route was laid more than 20 years ago. The trail was not successfully hiked until just two years...

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Make Hiking Rugged Again

Posted by on May 13, 2017 @ 8:51 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Make Hiking Rugged Again

Leave your hydration monitor, bluetooth speaker, and autonomous drone at home. On the trail, you’ll only need your brawn, smarts, and a smattering of old-school gear for this sort of hiking trip. Hiking trails these days are overcrowded, sissified dirt highways of giant-backpack-wearing, ill-prepared softies. Did the great explorers of pioneer days need zinc on their nose, gobs of pesticides on their bodies, and hand sanitizer for their soft, unworked palms? No, they surely did not. It’s time to get back to the basics of the outdoors...

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The Case for the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Posted by on May 12, 2017 @ 7:32 am in Conservation | 0 comments

The Case for the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

President Donald Trump’s national monuments executive order is an attack on American national parks, public lands, and oceans. One of its specific targets is the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah. Although some Utah politicians argue that this monument has had a negative impact on the surrounding area, the reality on the ground is quite different: By a margin of better than 2 to 1, Utahns believe that the monument’s designation was good for their state. Even the Utah Office of Tourism cites the monument as one of its “most...

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Zinke says monument designations have been an ‘effective tool,’ Hatch is confused

Posted by on May 11, 2017 @ 1:36 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Zinke says monument designations have been an ‘effective tool,’ Hatch is confused

As he embarked on a tour of Utah to review two national monuments, Ryan Zinke said he sees no evidence Native American proponents of Bears Ears National Monument were exploited by special interest groups, as state leaders have suggested. “I think they’re smart, capable, passionate, and have a deep sense of tie to their culture and want to preserve it,” the secretary of the Interior said after a meeting with the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition, which requested the monument on behalf of five tribes, at Salt Lake City’s...

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Boise’s hiking Grand Slam

Posted by on May 11, 2017 @ 9:07 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Boise’s hiking Grand Slam

Tom Lopez created the Grand Slam peaks of the Boise, Idaho, area as a four-step training regimen for his summer climbs. Others have latched onto the concept as a goal unto itself, or a circuit worth completing against the clock. “When I redid the website a couple of years ago, the Grand Slam peaks page disappeared,” said Lopez, a retired attorney, mountain climber and guidebook author (“Idaho: A Climbing Guide”) who lives in Boise. “I immediately got an email from someone going, ‘Where’s that page?’” The trailheads for the four peaks are less...

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Trail photographers provide an eye into Oregon’s wilderness

Posted by on May 10, 2017 @ 7:56 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Trail photographers provide an eye into Oregon’s wilderness

Ever wonder what nature looks like when you aren’t watching it? If a critter scurries through the forest and there’s no one there to see it, is it still adorable? The answer is yes. We know this through the efforts of trail photographers who operate remote trail cameras that capture nature as it looks when no humans are there to disturb it. There is a part of Oregon that no one will ever see with their own eyes. It is filled with wolves, foxes, bears and other creatures undisturbed by human activity. In fact, it is the very...

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Vermont’s Green Mountain Club looks to the future

Posted by on May 9, 2017 @ 8:07 am in Conservation, Hiking News | 0 comments

Vermont’s Green Mountain Club looks to the future

The Green Mountain Club, based in Waterbury, Vermont, is a membership based nonprofit organization that is responsible for the maintenance of the Long Trail system, including the 272-mile footpath through the wilderness, 185 miles of side trails and 70 backcountry campsites. The GMC also participates in maintenance and protection of Vermont’s 100-mile portion of the Appalachian Trail, a long-distance national scenic trail that extends from Georgia to Maine. The mission of the Green Mountain Club is to make the Vermont mountains play a larger...

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Healing from cancer, inside and out, with hiking

Posted by on May 8, 2017 @ 1:01 pm in Hiking News | 0 comments

Healing from cancer, inside and out, with hiking

After being diagnosed with an invasive, aggressive, triple-positive Stage I breast cancer in the fall of 2012, Patti McCarthy wasn’t sure she’d be able to continue her beloved hiking. And she’d had plans: She and her husband spent the previous months preparing to hike the whole Pacific Crest Trail, all 2,650 miles of it from Mexico to Canada. “After the diagnosis, I had a lot of concerns about being able to continue. I knew, as a nurse, what chemo could do,” she says. “Initially convinced my hiking days were over, we took a ‘last’ hike before...

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Tips for Hiking New Zealand’s 2,000-Mile Te Araroa

Posted by on May 8, 2017 @ 7:17 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Tips for Hiking New Zealand’s 2,000-Mile Te Araroa

Thirty people attempted a thru-hike its inaugural year. The 2016-17 season saw more than 500 people try it. With the number of hikers on one of the world’s newest long-distance trails more than doubling year after year, chances are you will begin hearing more about Te Araroa. Even though it may be impossible not to fall in love with New Zealand, Te Araroa is challenging enough to turn away plenty of hikers. The forests are better named jungles. The plant life is more dangerous than the wildlife. Nothing in New Zealand can kill you—not snakes,...

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Life returns slowly to Shortoff Mountain after fire

Posted by on May 7, 2017 @ 11:56 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Life returns slowly to Shortoff Mountain after fire

Topping out at just over 3,000 feet, its height alone does not make Shortoff Mountain one of the most famous peaks in all of Western North Carolina. It is also a destination for hikers, rock climbers, campers and lovers of wilderness adventure. Instead, Shortoff draws its fame from two outstanding physical features. One is its location at the southern end of Linville Gorge, the federally-protected wilderness area that is home to some of the most rugged landscapes in all of the Eastern United States. The second is the towering, dizzying,...

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Hiking race between Missouri state parks coming in June

Posted by on May 7, 2017 @ 7:30 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Hiking race between Missouri state parks coming in June

The Ozark Trail Association has an upcoming event that hiking enthusiasts may want to join. The association has recently announced its inaugural Taum-A-Hawk Hiking Race set for June 10, 2017. A one-day event open to the public, hikers will traverse the 13 miles of the Ozark Trail from Taum Sauk Mountain State Park to Johnson’s Shut-Ins State Park located in Iron County, Missouri. Journeying across some of the most scenic and rugged areas of the state, mixed-gender teams of two (with up to 50 teams total) will hike a time-trial-formatted race...

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Copenhagen’s Forgotten Giants

Posted by on May 6, 2017 @ 12:23 pm in Conservation | 0 comments

Copenhagen’s Forgotten Giants

Hiding giants is a tall order, but Thomas Dambo has managed to hide six in the area around Copenhagen, Denmark. Dambo is an artist who specializes in reclaimed and recycled materials, and the Forgotten Giants are no exception to this method, created from scrap wood collected from old, demolished buildings and felled trees. The sculptures were deliberately placed off the beaten track, and each is accompanied by a poem engraved on a nearby stone that gives hints about where it is hidden. There is also a “treasure map” of the area on which an...

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There are diseases hidden in ice, and they are waking up

Posted by on May 6, 2017 @ 6:49 am in Conservation | 0 comments

There are diseases hidden in ice, and they are waking up

Throughout history, humans have existed side-by-side with bacteria and viruses. From the bubonic plague to smallpox, we have evolved to resist them, and in response they have developed new ways of infecting us. We have had antibiotics for almost a century, ever since Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin. In response, bacteria have responded by evolving antibiotic resistance. The battle is endless: because we spend so much time with pathogens, we sometimes develop a kind of natural stalemate. However, what would happen if we were suddenly...

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Human noise pollution is everywhere, even in the national parks

Posted by on May 5, 2017 @ 11:55 am in Conservation | 0 comments

Human noise pollution is everywhere, even in the national parks

In wintertime, the sounds of nature are so subtle they’re almost imperceptible: The whistling of the wind though craggy mountaintops, the whispering branches of the trees; the soft, delicate patter of an unseen animal’s paws across snowy ground. “It’s a really quiet experience,” said Rachel Buxton, recalling a recent winter hike in southwest Colorado’s La Garita Wilderness. “You’re almost hearing your own heartbeat.” But every 30 minutes, a jet flew overhead, shattering the fragile calm. “It’s shocking,...

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Idaho’s Black Butte is otherworldly destination

Posted by on May 5, 2017 @ 8:48 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Instead of an actual trail, jumbled volcanic rock dictates that you meander through its obstacle course. Each turn brings you closer to the summit that tops out just up the road from the Shoshone Ice Caves, but progress was slow. The immense stone garden that is traversed continually changes. Early on, the ground surface contains enough soil interspersed between rocks to support a mix of native vegetation such as sagebrush, bunchgrasses and the emergence of forbs. Halfway to the top, any evidence of soil had disappeared and only the...

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Experts warn of increases in tick-borne Powassan virus

Posted by on May 4, 2017 @ 6:21 am in Hiking News | 0 comments

Experts warn of increases in tick-borne Powassan virus

Summer is nearly here, and it’s bringing fears of a rare tick-borne disease called Powassan. This potentially life-threatening virus is carried and transmitted by three types of ticks, including the deer tick that transmits Lyme disease. Over the past decade, 75 cases have been reported in the northeastern states and the Great Lakes region, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Though no one can say how many infections will occur this year, warmer winters have led to an increased tick population, so experts...

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