Teens aim to open hiking trails along Fort River to people with disabilities

Thirteen teens chose to forgo a summer job with air conditioning, instead braving the heat and fighting off mosquitoes to assemble a universally accessible hiking trail along the Fort River in Massachussetts. “It’s really inspiring to see these kids give up a summer to do manual labor outdoors. That’s saying a lot for them,” said Heather Furman, 27, an AmeriCorps member...

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New Zealander Hopes to Hike North and South Korea

Roger Shepherd, a former police officer from New Zealand, holds the unusual record of being the first foreigner to set foot in many of the remotest mountains of North Korea since at least the 1950-53 Korean War. Now, he is chasing a dream that looks even more daunting, something no one in living memory has attempted. He wants to walk the entire Baekdudaegan, the mountain...

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Trails to Turkish history and culture

Turkey is dense with both history and natural beauty, and much of it remains undiscovered or under-appreciated. The task of bringing these treasures back to the world’s consciousness is often left to enthusiasts, writers, or individual tour operators who have found a love of this region and its people. However, tourism in the country is often concentrated around the...

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With help from Boeing, the Palmetto Trail may finally be finished

Back in 1994, the Palmetto Conservation Foundation (PCF) decided the state of South Carolina needed a greenway. Connecting the sea to the mountains, it would be a sort of interstate highway for hikers and mountain bikers. In those days, South Carolina had a much different kind of state government. Then-governor Carroll Campbell allocated the first funding for what has...

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NC National Forest Swimming Discouraged Due to High Water Levels

FOREST SERVICE ALERT The U.S. Forest Service National Forests in North Carolina is urging visitors to the Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests to avoid swimming in the creeks, rivers and streams until water levels recede. Water levels are more than a foot above normal in some waterways. High water levels and strong currents pose a safety risk to visitors. Three...

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World Ranger Day Coming This Week

“World Ranger Day,” one day out of the year to show your appreciation for national park rangers the world over, arrives this week. The International Ranger Federation (IRF) was founded to support the work of rangers as the key protectors of the world’s protected areas. In 2006, at the World Ranger Congress in Scotland, IRF delegates decided that July 31...

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Section of White River National Forest trail to close for repairs

Part of a popular trail in the White Mountain National Forest will be closed next month for repairs to damage done during Tropical Storm Irene. The closure affects part of the Lincoln Woods Trail located off the Kancamagus Highway in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The U.S. Forest Service said it was able to stabilize the trail for short-term use, but a section of it requires...

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Jockey’s Ridge offers dune, hiking trails

Going to the North Carolina Outer Banks? Take time for a climb to the top of Jockey’s Ridge, an 80- to 100-foot sand dune at Nags Head. Nature has provided a gigantic “sandbox” for children and adults to enjoy. Jockey’s Ridge, the tallest sand dune system in the eastern United States, was designated a National Natural Landmark in 1974. The following year, the N.C....

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The Great Wall, Our Way

By JEANNIE RALSTON The Great Wall — 5,500 miles by some counts, longer by others — is not one wall, but many that were built starting in ancient times, and were consolidated and reinforced during the Ming dynasty (1368-1644). The purpose: keeping northern raiders from swooping down into the heart of China. The stretch of wall between Gubeikou and Jinshanling, which we...

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Finger Lakes Land Trust to buy land to create Skaneateles Lake hiking trail

The Spafford, NY Town Board is discussing a Finger Lakes Land Trust plan to buy 205 acres from the Burns family on Route 41 to create hiking trails at the southern end of Skaneateles Lake. The Finger Lakes Land Trust has an agreement to buy the property from Bill and Leonard Burns. “It’s the linchpin property in our goal to create a greenbelt along the south...

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Southwest hiking destination gaining deadly reputation

The luck of a draw had brought Anthony and Elisabeth Ann Bervel coveted hiking permits for The Wave, a region of richly colored sandstone patterns near the Utah-Arizona border. But just hours into their trek, 27-year-old Elisabeth Bervel died of cardiac arrest, becoming the third hiker in a month to succumb to the brutal summer heat and disorienting open country where no...

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Groups Envision a Shoreline Walk Between Bremerton and Gorst

A proposed trail along the shoreline from Bremerton, WA to Gorst could create a new access for pedestrians and bicycle riders while restoring a degraded shoreline, according to experts who attended a weekend planning session in Bremerton. The two-mile-long paved trail could fit between the shoreline and railroad tracks most of the way between Puget Sound Naval Shipyard...

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Blue Ridge Parkway crack is new attraction

It’s not the rippling mountain views. It’s not the chance to spot a black bear or a waterfall. The newest tourist attraction on the Blue Ridge Parkway north of Asheville, NC appears to be a giant crack in the asphalt. The crack, running down the center line of the roadway just north of the Tanbark Ridge Tunnel at milepost 374.5 and first noticed nearly two weeks ago, is...

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Bend woman completes 800-mile trek on Oregon Desert Trail

Sage Clegg of Bend this month became the first person to traverse the entire Oregon Desert Trail – hiking and biking nearly 800 miles from Bend to Adrian near the Idaho border in 37 days. The trip was not without rough moments, the worst of which Clegg said happened two days before finishing the journey. “I started out in the morning and I was not a minute...

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Long Trail footbridge will finally connect Duxbury and Bolton sections

The Winooski River’s 15-mile journey through the heart of the Green Mountains is spectacularly scenic. Dark, stony cliffs and sharp, evergreen-topped peaks rise abruptly from the river, which carves through the mountains from east to west. It’s also one of the prettiest sections on the Long Trail, the “footpath in the wilderness” that runs the length of Vermont, from...

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Plan would eventually link Chambersburg Rail Trail, Appalachian Trail

Talks are under way for the first phase of an 18-mile trail connecting the Chambersburg Rail Trail at Wilson College to the Appalachian Trail in Caledonia State Park, Pennsylvania. The six-mile section of the Conococheague Trailway would cross the campus of the former Scotland School for Veterans’ Children and the Chambersburg Country Club. The first phase of the...

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Senate Committee Taking Testimony July 25 On Funding The National Park Service

A hearing July 25th before the full Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will delve into the fiscal needs of the National Park Service for the next fiscal year. Specifically, the senators want to hear about “supplemental” funding mechanisms that could help the Park Service afford the National Park System. A range of supplemental funding sources was...

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San Ramon Valley Map Book Features 3-D Mt. Diablo Hiking Trails

More than 25,000 map books that cover streets, buildings and trails in the San Ramon Valley region will be available for residents or visitors in late July and August. The magazine-style maps, which cover Danville, Alamo, Blackhawk, San Ramon, Diablo and Rossmoor and downtown Walnut Creek displays 3-D elevations and hiking trails in Mt. Diablo State Park, Las Trampas...

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Quebec’s hiking trails ‘a great secret’ unknown to anglophones, says new guide

Michael Haynes, author of the new book “Hiking Trails of Montreal and Beyond,” says many of Quebec’s excellent walking routes are “a great secret,” largely unknown to anglophones. Most websites on trails in the province, as well as printed material and access information, are in French only, he says in his preface. The book profiles 50...

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TEENS on TRAIL – Hike Safe Contest

Hiking is fun, but inexperienced hikers, especially teens, are most at risk for injury, even death. Teens can enter a digital media contest to help raise awareness about hiking safety and win a backpack filled with the hiking “Ten Essentials.” Youth enter by submitting a link to an entry by Sept. 30 at Washington Trails Association. The entry can be a photo, video, sound...

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Wind farm lets you bike, hike or hunt among towering turbines

From Interstate 90, the wind turbines seem like toothpicks. But up close they are massive, and there may be no better place to learn about them than the Wild Horse Wind Farm, Puget Sound Energy’s power plantation 18 miles northeast of Ellensburg, WA. Its privately owned 11,000 acres of scrubby brush and ravines are accessible to the public for hiking or biking,...

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Lake Superior’s North Shore, Isle Royale hard to beat for hikers

Lake Superior contains more water than all the other Great Lakes combined, and all that water has to come from somewhere. More than 300 rivers and streams empty into the lake, including many in the stretch of Minnesota between Duluth and Grand Portage along the North Shore. The Cascade River drops 900 feet in its last three miles, and even at low water levels prevailing,...

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Woodsy escapes for your summer vacation

Looking at most summer travel editorials, you’d think everyone on Earth wants the same thing from a warm-weather getaway; beach, beach and more beach. But even if you love your time on the sand, some of us also enjoy spending time in the quiet, shady forests — it’s when the area is most “alive” and a more comfortable time to hike. Basecamp in Lake...

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Take care when hiking in the heat

Staying hydrated is a critical way to avoid heat-related problems during summer hikes. The human body is limited in the amount of fluid it can absorb, even when it is losing a high volume of sweat. Typically, a person can process about a quart, or 32 ounces, of fluid an hour. While that might not replace all of the fluid lost through sweat, it’s typically enough....

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Trekking the Ridgeway: Britain’s oldest road

By Ben Lerwill, for CNN The stone in front of me, twice my height, has been standing here in Avebury, England, for more than 4,500 years. The rough, pitted rock forms part of a huge Neolithic stone circle within which a pub, a post office and several cottages now stand. Avebury is one of the world’s great pagan heritage sites – and one of the most mysterious....

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A mountain jewel: Tennessee’s newest state park to be located in the middle of Rocky Fork

On July 1, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation officially acquired 2,036 acres in the middle of the Rocky Fork tract located in the mountains of upper East Tennessee. Surrounding the state park’s future site is 7,600 acres that have been added to the Cherokee National Forest thanks to $30 million in funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund. At...

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How the UK’s national parks can cut traffic and reach their full potential

The UK’s 15 national parks – 10 in England, two in Scotland and three in Wales – will cost the public purse about £65m a year in 2013. They represent some the best value in public spending at the moment – but the parks are not doing enough to justify the special powers that they have. While it is unreasonable to expect a national park authority to solve every...

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Native Peoples Honored with Trail in Oregon National Forest

The Alsea were a tribe of Native Americans who, for thousands of years, lived along the central Oregon Coast. In 1901 anthropologist Livingston Farrand predicted their loss in “Notes on the Alsea Indians of Oregon.” The City of Yachats, a small coastal city in Oregon, has joined with the U.S. Forest Service and Oregon State Parks to dedicate the new Ya’Xaik (pronounced...

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125 years of hut-to-hut hiking in New Hampshire’s White Mountains

Seems quite simple, really: one foot in front of the other. But when you’re faced with adversity such as flooded trails, heavy humidity, biting black flies, the threat of thunderstorms, and ascents and descents on rock-laden trails that at times feel like a Marine Corps obstacle course, nothing is easy. Then you arrive at the next hut, each a day’s hike apart, looking at...

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Butte des Morts conservation club unveils new hiking trail, habitat protection area

The Butte des Morts Conservation Club is showing off the Oshkosh, WI area’s newest hiking trail this summer. The 3.8-mile trail along a breakwall at the club’s Terrell’s Island property, on the south shore of Lake Butte des Morts, is the most recent addition to a conservation project that began more than a decade ago. The club collaborated with the Department of Natural...

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Hiking Wyoming’s Medicine Bow Peak

Wyoming’s high country does not always lend itself to quick weekend getaways. The trailheads are often isolated, requiring hours of driving. The trails themselves frequently spend miles winding their way towards the peaks. In short, reaching the high country is usually a time consuming, laborious endeavor. So what is a mountain loving, time-strapped person to do? The...

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StandHere.net, Rodney Lough Jr.’s New Hiking Website, Is Live

Master Wilderness Photographer Rodney Lough Jr. has spent a lifetime hiking to the ends of the earth in order to find the best views of the most beautiful places on the planet. Now he’s sharing these special places with the world with his new website, StandHere.net. Stand Here guides its users to stunning Viewpoints in locations ranging from Acadia to Zion National...

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