Walking and talking in Nova Scotia, a small province with sweeping vistas and welcoming locals

When you tell people you’re going to Nova Scotia to hike, many seemed mystified. The province is not very big, and their mental picture may be of a placid landscape on a peninsula better known for high tides than high hills. Mental pictures may come from a vibrant art exhibit by a Canadian cohort of painters known as the Group of Seven, whose works featured...

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Fiery Gizzard reroute continues, volunteers needed

Despite the wet, cold weather, work is steadily moving forward to reroute the Fiery Gizzard Trail on the Cumberland Plateau, but crews need some helping hands. The Friends of South Cumberland State Park just received a $2,000 Tennessee Trails Association grant that will pay for a heaving-lifting system. Park rangers will use the system to move large rocks, bridge lumber...

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Hiking near the waterfalls of Marin County’s Cataract Trail

The sound of rushing water floods your ears even before Cataract Creek is fully in view, descending the northern flank of Mount Tamalpais, California amid a riot of boulders, lush moss, graceful ferns and arching trees. Prepare to be amazed by this magical place, where each step along the trail reveals some new variation on the blend of rocks and water responsible for a...

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Loving the Wilderness to Death

Now a research biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, stationed at Virginia Tech, Jeff Marion’s specialty is Recreation Ecology, meaning he studies visitor impact to protected natural areas and consults with land managers to make visitation sustainable. By his account, he is one of four such scientists actively conducting research in the U.S., and he has mentored...

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Historical Trails, Cherokees, and the Civil War

At Wild South, a large part of the Cultural Heritage department’s work is focused on researching and mapping historical trails on public lands. These trails tie us to the past, illustrating how ways of life have changed over time. Many trails and roads are directly connected to the history of the United States. For example, travel ways leading from western North Carolina...

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A Hiking Map That’s Got Heart

Some lovers write their names in the sand at the beach, capping the eternal gesture with a giant heart drawn around both monikers. (“Eternal” in spirit, of course; when the tide arrives those names will become one with the sea.) Some lovers make heart patterns on grassy hillsides, symbolic gestures writ large courtesy of autumn leaves or the petals of...

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Hiking the Ghostly Tracks of Forgotten Trains

Los Angeles used to be covered in train tracks. Their phantom switches, markers, rails, and ties tell stories of travel and transport, history and happenings, and the growth of Southern California, outwards and upwards. But in this age of adaptive reuse, we’re increasingly converting land once dedicated to industrial purposes into parks, bike paths, and hiking...

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Project to improve access to highest peak in Shenandoah National Park

The highest peak in Shenandoah National Park is on track for some springtime TLC as part of a nationwide flurry of projects marking a centennial celebration. The summit at Hawksbill Mountain – and its panoramic views of the Shenandoah Valley – is among the park’s most popular attractions. The National Park Service and a local philanthropic partner will invest...

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200-year-old AT landmark falls in Michaux forest

A landmark on the Appalachian Trail has crumbled. The stone wall of a barn built around 1800 came down last week, according to Roy Brubaker, district forester of Michaux State Forest. Known, probably incorrectly, as the “Hessian barn” – the three-story wall was a well-known curiosity for hikers on the Maine-to-Georgia trail. The site is located on Michaux Road in...

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25 New Projects Getting More Kids & Adults Active In National Parks

More than two dozen new projects at national parks across the country will give kids and adults the opportunity to participate in recreation and exercise programs thanks to 25 Active Trails grants from the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks. “From Zumba and yoga, to paddling along the seashore, to guided hikes for...

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Trekking through Grenada’s paradise island

The people of Grenada all seem to have spirited gifts. Maybe it stems from the love they feel for their country and the relaxed laid-back lifestyles they share. The paradisiacal island is located in the Eastern Caribbean, just 100 miles north of Venezuela. It boasts 440 picturesque square kilometres, one sixth of which is preserved as parks and natural wildlife...

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Hiking community fights to save popular North Sound trail from logging

Near Seattle, WA, one of the North Sound’s most popular and scenic hiking trails is in danger of being logged. Unless the state can allocate $7.5 million, the 100-year-old trees that cover Oyster Dome — between Mount Vernon and Bellingham – will be cut down by the Department of Natural Resources. Craig Romano tackles the popular hike off Highway 11 on a...

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Why Is Thomas Gathman Hiking the Appalachian Trail in Winter?

Before sunrise one morning in mid-December, two weeks into his winter attempt to thru-hike the Appalachian Trail, Thomas Gathman marched toward two of Mount Bigelow’s craggy peaks in western Maine as a snowstorm descended. By the time he’d bagged the first one, 4,088-foot Avery Peak, he was trudging through a foot of new fallen snow. As Gathman stumbled across the...

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White hot stuff – Hiking Alkali Flats with Trail Snails

This feels like walking in soft marshmallows,” murmured Carolyn Dullum.There’s nothing like slow motion squish-walking down a gypsum dune. Trail Snails, a local hiking group, trek a most unusual hike into the gypsum dunes of White Sands National Monument, about an hour and a half from Ruidoso, New Mexico. “I’ve hiked Alkali Flats many times,” said Barbara Willard,...

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British national park bosses plead with walkers to stop building cairns

National park wardens in Great Britain are pleading with walkers to stop making cairns on the mountains. Snowdonia staff say footpaths and the fragile upland environment are being damaged by the custom of picking up stones and piling them up to mark routes. The problem has become so severe that a demolition day is planned for cairns on the Cadair Idris in the South of...

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A Three-Day Trek in the Highlands of Myanmar

This is a three-day hike in the southwestern part of Shan State, Myanmar — farming country known mostly for narrow, silvery Inle Lake, a popular destination for travelers. Bountiful and ethnically diverse, southern Shan is a patchwork of villages and farms growing sesame, wheat, potatoes, rice and chiles in a stunning highland landscape. Dirt paths and quiet roads...

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‘Girl In The Woods’: Healing through hiking

Nature and the wilderness is often portrayed as a place of peace and isolation, but any illusion that the wilderness of the Pacific Crest Trail is isolated and peaceful is proven false in Wild Child’s experiences along the trail. The Pacific Crest Trail hiking line is a male-dominated environment, peopled with strange men and women, and offers very little protection from...

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Hiking club continues legacy of conservation, enjoying the outdoors

More than 600 UT students belong to a club that began with a hike between two YMCA leaders over 80 years ago. In October of 1924, Marshall Wilson and George Barber, YMCA leaders of a boys’ camp in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, decided to go on a hike. While hiking, the pair came to an agreement that they should start a club and begin leading trips to the Smokies for whoever was...

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Trekking Through the Aravaipa Canyon, Arizona

Aravaipa Canyon is extremely narrow—at many points, probably no more than a quarter of a mile from rim to rim—which means that to explore the canyon you often hike right through the stream bed. Traverse the entire twelve-mile length of the canyon and you’ll cross the creek at least forty times, sometimes in water that’s knee deep. Aravaipa Creek is a rarity in the...

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What’s The Best Way To Keep Mosquitoes From Biting?

Don’t get bitten by mosquitoes. That’s the advice offered to the public in virtually every article on the rapidly-spreading, mosquito-borne Zika virus. But if you love the outdoors and are a regular hiker, what can you do? There’s no arguing with the advice. Zika, once considered a relatively mild flu-like illness, has now been linked to a surge in...

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Winter hiking in Taos: Pescado Trail

Now is the time for hiking in solitude and snowy silence at Wild Rivers, just north of Taos, New Mexico. One of the less-traveled paths is the Pescado Trail that connects the Red River Fish Hatchery with the Wild Rivers Visitor Center. This trail gains about 800 feet over two miles and is considered a moderate trail in the summer months. Add a foot or two of snow and the...

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DuPont State Recreational Forest Temporary Trail Closures due to wet conditions

North Carolina Forest Service officials have determined that the recent snow event has made DuPont’s trails extremely susceptible to damage from trail users because of soft, wet conditions. There will be temporary closures of all of the DuPont single track trails. Forest roads and two-track trails such as Triple Falls, High Falls, and Hooker Falls trails will remain...

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Timberline Trail is being reconnected, opening 40-mile trek around Mt. Hood

The Timberline Trail has always been one of very best hikes in the Pacific Northwest. A nearly 40-mile trek around the peak of Mt. Hood, the trail offers stunning angles of the mountain as well as views of the other giants of the Cascade Range: Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Jefferson and the Three Sisters. But for the last decade that loop has been...

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East Africa: Hiking Among Elephants in the Aberdares

The Aberdares Mountain Range is 160km from “tip to toe” and encompasses over 2,000sqkm of Afro-montane wilderness. There are several ways to tackle this pristine highland. One such hike is to Mt Satima, or Ol Donyo Lesatima, the highest peak at 3,999m and located on the south-eastern end of the range. Leave Nairobi before dawn; on average, the hike takes...

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Amidst the Giants: Sequoias in Winter

Sequoia groves are found throughout the Sequoia, Sierra, Stanislaus, Eldorado and Tahoe National Forests in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Multiple agencies, businesses and non-profits are collaborating to improve management and share scientific results regarding Giant Sequoia. Led by the National Forest Foundation, the Sequoia Work Group members believe better exchange of...

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Hiking New Zealand’s Great Walks

Several items are essential for exploring the magical Southern Alps mountains that run across New Zealand’s South Island: insect repellent, rain gear and ear plugs. The repellent is to ward off sandflies, those annoying black bugs that are the itchy scourge of hikers in Fiordland National Park. The park, which is bigger than Yosemite and Yellowstone national parks...

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Fifth annual Winter hiking event set at Burr Oak, Ohio

The Buckeye Trail Association announced, in partnership with the Burr Oak State Park, Burr Oak Lodge and Burr Oak Alive!, the fifth annual Burr Oak Winter Hike will be held at the Lodge on Feb. 6, 2016 starting at 10 a.m. This free event is being hosted by the Little Cities of the Forest Chapter of the Buckeye Trail Association. After the hike, lunch including cornbread,...

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Forest Service Closures in North Carolina Due to Severe Winter Weather

Due to snow and ice accumulation across North Carolina from winter storm Jonas, the U.S. Forest Service will be closing some areas on the National Forests in North Carolina. Visitor and Forest Service employee safety is a priority and everyone is encouraged to be prepared for dangerous driving conditions. Visitors are urged to stay off Forest Service roads and reschedule...

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Hike to Silver Falls’ lesser-known waterfalls

It wouldn’t be fair to call them the “forgotten waterfalls of Silver Falls State Park.” After all, the five cascades smack in the middle of Oregon’s largest state park are still part of the Trail of Ten Falls, one of the most famous hikes in the Pacific Northwest. But the truth is, this quintet of waterfalls get far fewer visitors than the most crowded sections of the...

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What you should know before hiking to Havasupai Falls

If you have been on the Internet in the last 10 years, it’s likely you have seen this iconic turquoise-colored waterfall cascading over bright redwall limestone. This stunning swimming hole is in a remote part of the Grand Canyon and accessible only by a 10-mile hike in or by helicopter. The land is administered by the Havasupai Tribe, which has lived in the area...

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