Cobrabraid 550 Paracord Bracelet

Disclosure: Cobrabraid contacted me to try their paracord bracelet at no cost to me. My only responsibility was an agreement to write this review. I was not pressured to make a positive endorsement.

On April 25, 2012 the Cobrabraid marketing team emailed the following:

Our products are definitely geared towards your readers. You never know when you could use a few feet of paracord on the trail if you’re in some sort of trouble. We could send you a few bracelets to review.

So, I took them up on their offer. On April 30, 2012 I received the bracelets seen above.

First I had to learn something about Cobrabraid and paracord bracelets. The Cobrabraid brand is a family-owned business in Brewerton, NY. Seems the paracord bracelets came from the deserts of Iraq and were originally brought to the U.S. by our soldiers. Cobrabraid utilizes paracord produced in the USA by a government contractor. It has seven inner woven strands surrounded by a tightly woven sheath that has a break strength of more than 550 pounds. Seems impressive. It could certainly hold my weight.

So what’s the deal with the bracelet?

I suppose it’s kind of a fashion thing, though not really my style. Wearing it around your wrist while hiking is an easy way to tote one, but they’re only 8″ long and will easily attach to, or fit in your pack. In an emergency, you simply unwind the paracord that is woven into the bracelet and, voila, you have a multi-purpose tool.

The bracelets come in two sizes. Small is 1/2″ wide with 6 feet of paracord made for a 7″ wrist. Large is 3/4″ wide with 8 feet of paracord for an 8″ wrist. The bracelets come stock in more than a dozen colors and can also be ordered with design-your-own custom colors and patterns. They come standard with a velcro clasp, but also can be ordered with a buckle, and even a buckle with a whistle. Helpful if you get lost.

If the bracelet isn’t your cup of tea, the woven paracord also comes attached to keychains and carabiners. You can even get 100 feet of paracord woven into a belt very practical. For those who like to do their own thing, there are DIY kits as well.

If you’re skeptical that 6-8 feet of cord doesn’t seem all that handy, consider these potential uses:

  • tourniquet
  • animal snare
  • boot lace
  • clothes line
  • fishing line
  • tie down
  • fire starter bow
  • sling
  • hoist

The usefulness is limited only by your imagination.

So what do I think?

Ok, I can see it as a small, lightweight handy safety tool. It isn’t going to add appreciable weight to your pack, so why not have one? If all your hiking partners have one too, perhaps you could lash them together to pull someone out of a ravine. I probably wouldn’t wear one on my wrist as I rarely even wear a watch, but sure, I’ll throw one or two in my pack.

Right out of the package, they are stiff. So if you did choose to wear one there would be a break-in period. I think I would also choose the velcro clasp simply for ease of use. Remember too, if you wear one as a bracelet and then have to use it, you would then need to re-braid it. With my plan of keeping it in my pack, it really doesn’t matter if it is unwoven.

Cobrabraid is aggressively marketing their products. I’ve noticed recent reviews by some of my brother and sister hiking bloggers like Appalachia & Beyond, East West Hike, and the Outdoor Blogger Network. Good for Cobrabraid. They’re trying to make this work and there’s no better way of getting themselves out there than word of mouth, or blog in this case.

Disclosure: Cobrabraid contacted me to try their paracord bracelet at no cost to me. My only responsibility was an agreement to write this review. I was not pressured to make a positive endorsement.

 

This post was created by Jeff Clark. Please feel free to use the sharing icons below, or add your thoughts to the comments. Pack it in, pack it out. Preserve the past. Respect other hikers. Let nature prevail. Leave no trace.

 

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